153,252 Cool-Season Crops Home Design Photos

The Brickman Group, Ltd.
1 Review
Potager Garden
Ideabooks445
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salad greens and turnips. Surprising cool-season crops: including asparagus, potatoes and rhubarb. Yes, they are often thought of and grown in the summer, but they prefer the cooler temperatures of spring and fall.
Check for frost dates. While cool-season crops can even handle some frost, you’ll
parsnips, salad greens and turnips. Surprising cool-season crops: including asparagus, potatoes and rhubarb. Yes, they are often thought of and grown in the summer, but they prefer the cooler temperatures of spring and fall.
Fall and cool season plants to grow
Check for frost dates. While cool-season crops can even handle some frost, you’ll need to pay attention to air and soil temperatures to get the most out of your garden. This means planting early enough in fall to allow plants to reach maturity before hard frosts hit or daytime temperature drops too low
“diversity of plants” — ijanms
Jocelyn H. Chilvers
2 Reviews
blue cabbage
Ideabooks627
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their storage life. More: How to Grow Cool-Season Vegetables More in Cool-Season Crops » Get a Jump on a Cool-Season Vegetable Garden » Extend Your Growing Season With a Cold Frame in the Garden » Cool-Season Vegetables: How to Grow Lettuce » Cool-Season Vegetables: How to Grow Beets »
hits. These are usually grown as ornamentals, but they are edible. More: How to Grow Cool-Season Vegetables Add to ideabook by Jocelyn H. Chilvers by Jocelyn H. Chilvers When to plant: Like most cool-season crops, cabbage is happiest growing in fall or spring. For spring planting, sow the seeds of an
Cabbage: When to plant: Like most cool-season crops, cabbage is happiest growing in fall or spring. For spring planting, sow the seeds of an early variety in very early spring
“Green and purple cabbage” — sineid
Amy Renea
Garden Tour
Ideabooks12
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Cool-Season Crops Get Their ChanceWith the kids back to school and the temperatures dipping just a bit, it is time to start the fall harvest and count on cool-season crops. Broccoli, kale and a second set of peas are the new kids on the block this month in the garden.
sure to prepare your beds by amending the soil if necessary and by choosing a bright, sunny location for the best harvest.More on growing vegetables in cool weather
“Gardening thoughts” — Kathy Hudson
Paintbox Garden
6 Reviews
Lettuce
Ideabooks71
Questions0
compost-rich beds in August, my plants are ready to harvest by late October but are almost too pretty to pick! Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is another cool-season crop that looks good planted along walkways or tucked into beds or containers. Look for pretty heirloom types like 'Speckled Trout' or 'Merlot', which
compost-rich beds in August, my plants are ready to harvest by late October but are almost too pretty to pick! Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is another cool-season crop that looks good planted along walkways or tucked into beds or containers.
Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is a cool-season crop that looks good planted in containers
compost-rich beds in August, my plants are ready to harvest by late October but are almost too pretty to pick! Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is another cool-season crop that looks good planted along walkways or tucked into beds or containers.Look for pretty heirloom types like 'Speckled Trout' or 'Merlot', which
“Lettuce” — Jillian Lamoureux
Amy Renea
Garden Tour
Ideabooks1,176
Questions0
Cool-Season Vegetables: How to Grow Lettuce Photo 1 of 3 When to plant: For spring crops, sow seeds or set out seedlings in early spring. (See thinning recommendations for spacing.) Continue to sow or transplant every couple of weeks so you’ll have a continuous crop, keeping in mind
filling or cooked. (Look for darker leaves to get the most nutrition out of the leaves.) And despite its prevalence in summer salads, it is a true cool-season crop. Lettuces are generally divided into four different types: •Leaf lettuces are easy to grow and quick to mature; you may have greens as early
When to plant: For spring crops, sow seeds or set out seedlings in early spring. (See thinning recommendations for spacing.) Continue to sow or transplant every couple of weeks so you’ll have a continuous crop, keeping in mind that unless the garden is shaded, temperatures above about 75 degrees will
“lettuce” — silkstalkings1
Sheila Schmitz
Spring seedlings
Ideabooks108
Questions0
Fahrenheit (24 degrees Celsius) for heat-loving warm-season plants by setting them on a heating mat or on top of a water heater or refrigerator. Don’t let the surface get too hot, though; above 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius) is too high. Cool-season plants will be fine with average home temperatures
“Planting Plant 2 seeds per small starting pot, or scatter seeds across the top of the mix in a seed” — lyvigil
Sheila Schmitz
Lettuce bed
Ideabooks7
Questions0
cool-season crops
Sheila Schmitz
Baby lettuce mix grows in a spring pot
Ideabooks6
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cool-season crops
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