38,024 Formal pruning Home Design Photos

The Real Garden Company
Town Garden - Country style with a twist
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We used Italian style pruning of the 60 - 80 year old hollies, (Ilex aquifolium) in this picture to help give a structure to this garden, and a compositional framework for the woodland planting below. After drastically reducing the crowns of the trees we now clip bi annually using a cherry picker, the
Frank H. Minier
Juniper
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Questions0
Formal pruning
CAROLE MEYER
1 Review
Carole Meyer www.carolemeyerart.com
Ideabooks6,701
Questions5
I like the terra-cotta planter with a formally pruned shrub? Would look good as a pair flanking steps or on the patio to the right or left of door, etc.
“Wall” — c_lismil
Loudon County Pool and Spa Designer
New Construction of in ground gunite pools, renovation of existing pools, full retail store, and service on all types of swimming pools.
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1 Review
Santa Monica - Mediterranean
Ideabooks2,475
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combination pruning - boxy & rounded
formal, pruned plants, green
NICE FORMAL DESIGN, PRUNED TREES
Formal garden entry...formal entry
“seating” — janelle9
Smalls Landscaping
12 Reviews
Creating enclosure and shade with Landscaping in your front yard
Ideabooks4,563
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clipping or pruning. Other dome-forming conifers include Picea abies ‘Little Gem’ and Cryptomeria japonica ‘Globosa’.
Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Gold Mop’ forms a perfect golden mound without clipping or pruning.
Sawara Cypress "Golden Mop" (Chamaecyparis pisifera 'Golden Mop') Slow-growing - forms a perfect golden mound without clipping or pruning.
Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Gold Mop’ forms a perfect golden mound without clipping or pruning. Other dome-forming conifers include Picea abies ‘Little Gem’ and Cryptomeria japonica ‘Globosa’.
mounded shape that we create through clipping. The slow-growing Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Gold Mop’ forms a perfect golden mound without clipping or pruning. Other dome-forming conifers include Picea abies ‘Little Gem’ and Cryptomeria japonica ‘Globosa’.
“Look” — fotogal54
The New York Botanical Garden
hybrid tea rose
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beautiful roses! Prune in Feb., after all frost is gone
Why prune? Pruning is regenerative. It stimulates
it. While you may not prune perfectly every time, it’s always better to prune than not to prune. When to prune. Prune roses during their dormancy, before they send out new growth. In mild climates, this means mid-December through February. In more extreme climates, wait until the final threat of frost
Why prune? Pruning is regenerative. It stimulates new growth and can enhance and open up the form and shape of the plants, Chuang says. It also removes dying or diseased portions that can damage the overall health of a garden. Roses are sturdy and forgiving, and will be healthier plants because of it
“Its Beautiful” — donnaspinner2
Troy Rhone Garden Design
15 Reviews
Garden Gate
Ideabooks7,368
Questions6
Need little pruning and provide a year-round screen.
Narrow evergreens with thick foliage, such as the arborvitae (Thuja spp) in this photograph, upright junipers (Juniperus spp) and columnar blue spruce (Picea pungens 'Iseli Fastigiate') need little pruning and provide
arborvitae (Thuja spp) in this photograph, upright junipers (Juniperus spp) and columnar blue spruce (Picea pungens 'Iseli Fastigiate') need little pruning and provide a year-round screen that is much taller than most building codes will permit for structures.
arborvitae (Thuja spp) in this photograph, upright junipers (Juniperus spp) and columnar blue spruce (Picea pungens 'Iseli Fastigiate') need little pruning and provide a year-round screen that is much taller than most building codes will permit for structures.
“Garden - simple gate” — kremerschu
Land Design, Inc.
Fenced Garden
Ideabooks15,160
Questions3
more. Swiss chard is really easy. Prune roses. Finish pruning this month except in cold-climates such as the high mountains. As a rule, cut back hybrid tea roses by about a third, and leave three to five canes sprouting from the base. Shrub roses need less precise pruning — basically, shear them to control
control the size and shape. Fertilize all roses after pruning. Prune fruit trees. Prune and spray deciduous fruit trees, such as apple, peach, apricot and pear. Check on the how-to with expert books or advisers at your local nursery.Plant summer-blooming bulbs. In a month filled with daffodils, think about
can do this month — including winter pruning and planting of spring flowers and vegetables, which can be sped up by the warming effect of a raised bed, as shown. Deal with frost damage. If winter frosts hit some of your plants, wait until later this month to prune off the damage. Get traditional winter
“Raised gardening would be great in our backyard” — kbeeson100
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