438,243 Georgian style Home Design Photos

Hull Historical
1 Review
Georgian home
Ideabooks1,835
Questions2
Colonial Georgian-style home. The crown molding is similar to what is shown in the previous illustration.
molding in a Colonial Georgian-style home
molding in a Colonial Georgian-style home. The crown molding is similar to what is shown in the previous illustration.
This photo demonstrates the effect of built-up crown molding in a Colonial Georgian-style home. The crown molding
photo demonstrates the effect of built-up crown molding in a Colonial Georgian-style home. The crown molding is similar to what is shown in the previous illustration.
demonstrates the effect of built-up crown molding in a Colonial Georgian-style home. The crown molding is similar to what is shown in the previous illustration
“Add Trim to door frames! Nice” — pwesterhof69
Hull Historical
1 Review
Georgian home
Ideabooks732
Questions0
Georgian-Style TrimSay you don't want the stained-wood look and the colonial style is just a bit too simple for you. If so, try the Georgian style. More curvilinear and flowing than colonial, this style is ideal for larger and more formal homes.
trim for georgian style
features of Georgian-style trim.
Georgian home...Georgian style trim...georgian woodwork...Georgian style...Georgian-style trim...Georgian trim!...georgian trim...great Georgian trim
“bookcase” — wesmcdonald
Sundeleaf Painting
9 Reviews
Residential Exteriors
Ideabooks4,699
Questions7
Georgian Style house are usually two stories houses with dormers sometimes
eclectic styles. Colonial revival homes, such as this one, became the most popular and replicated of eclectic fashions. Like others, this style took many forms but found its inspiration in a departure from fanciful Victorian design and a looking back on Georgian and other colonial-era styles that were
Colonial revival. After Georgian style proliferated and evolved into the more sophisticated Adam style, ancient classical architecture took hold in the succeeding period — the middle of the 19th century. That period lasted until the proliferation of Victorian-era houses, of which most had medieval roots
and suburban developments often mimic authentic characteristics. Like the Georgian, this style is very common throughout the United States, and is still being replicated.Your turn: Do you see elements of your house in this style?Next: Many Cultures Make Their Marks on Mediterranean Design
“Front door” — chrissyn
Neumann Lewis Buchanan Architects
Lombardy
Ideabooks1,006
Questions0
Georgian style- Dormer Windows, Chimneys on both sides.
Julia Pockett 18 "early Georgian period — the 18th-century reigns of George I and George II. King George... English Georgian homes were inspired by the strong classical designs of early Romans... snapshot of Georgian style. While a
atmosphere... not in a Georgian style home. Ugg..., the light fixtures in photos two and 5 (industrial... classic styles would. The modern sparse chandelier style emphasizes width while a drop..."
window and grandeur are also in evidence in this house. One difference can be seen in the roof form; both hip roofs and gables are common with Georgian-style houses.
“Too big but love!” — yasinneya
Barnes Vanze Architects, Inc
Stone Georgian Home
Ideabooks7,026
Questions5
17th century studied classical styles and produced disciplines that directly advanced into 18th-century America. In order of occurrence, three significant American styles developed from British Renaissance classical influence: Georgian, Adam and colonial revival. Georgian and Adam came first within the
early-20th-century tastes turned to colonial revival styles, which are considered eclectic designs.Likely dating to the early 20th century, the Georgian-inspired home shown here illustrates several common details that are characteristic of that style, several signatures of which allude to Renaissance classical
townhouse versions. This revered and distinguished style populates just about every town across America in significant numbers and is still emulated in vernacular developments, particularly in the eastern United States.
“Federal” — gcfdesigns
Witt Construction
2 Reviews
2005 showcase
Ideabooks6,113
Questions7
We are building a similar style house but not as big and fabulous.
Christina wants to be a Georgian princess.
Georgian house: The design is the most common colonial style. Has pillars in front of the house.
I like the driveway and the style of the home with it
Georgian Architecture; Circular driveway; two-story design, upward exterior layout.
Palladian window focuses attention above the entrance, and stout chimneys pierce the center of the hip roof.An ironic flexibility exists within the Georgian style: Houses can be very small, or they can be the most extravagant mansions.
“wood balustrade” — cjojo
Tucker & Marks
Georgian Residence
Ideabooks3,637
Questions4
Hello! This is a Louis XVI-style cylindrical lantern with 4 glass panels surrounding an 8-light center stem in an antiqued bronze finish, purchased from Marvin Alexander: http://www.marvinalexanderinc.com/
Hello! This is a Louis XVI-style cylindrical lantern with 4 glass panels surrounding
I love the Grecian style of this room, with a focus on the greek key floor borders.
Georgian-style interiors can exhibit the classical elements that were embraced in the Renaissance and later in England; pilasters, arches, pediments, and dentil crown molding are visible in this ornate entry.
“arch” — laraine77
David Jones Architects
3 Reviews
Georgian Manor
Ideabooks248
Questions2
early georgian period 1714 - 1760
Chippendale is a sub-category of early Georgian. The wood of choice was walnut, eventually morphing to mahogany.
Built ins. The style is a bit too formal for us, but the era
use of gilding. Chippendale is a sub-category of early Georgian. The wood of choice was walnut, eventually morphing to mahogany.
Early Georgian. Early Georgian (1714–1760) is named after kings George I and George II. Early Georgian furniture is a more ornate version of Queen Anne, characterized
Early Georgian. Early Georgian (1714–1760) is named after kings George I and George II. Early Georgian furniture is a more ornate version of Queen Anne, characterized by heavier proportions, elaborately carved cabriole legs terminating in a pad or ball-and-claw foot, ornate carvings, pierced back splats
“Sofas” — haddonfieldinn
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