204,105 Public building Home Design Photos

FINNE Architects
23 Reviews
Lake Forest Park Renovation
Ideabooks7,155
Questions9
About how much did it cost to build?
be wood floors, not terrazzo. 2. If you want to see terrazzo floors, many US public buildings built before 1980 have highly decorated terrazzo floors in high traffic lobby areas (marble was the previous public building choice, but marble is easily destroyed by stilletto heels, which came into widespread
expensive and hard to install Found in kitchens, schools and large commercial buildings popular
Terrazzo Flooring Pros - durable Cons - expensive; hard to install Found in kitchens, schools, large buildings. Popular.
huge expanses, it was cheaper to lay down than anything else, and is (relatively) cheap to maintain (ever wonder why the floors in your old office building's lobby get polished once a month or more?). In a house, with walls every ten to thirty feet, I can't even IMAGINE how much more it would cost to
“counters” — meruiz1
Claudio Ortiz Design Group, Inc.
1 Review
Exterior, Entry, Living Room, Kitchen and Bedroom
Ideabooks2,719
Questions7
Drywall - This is a very commonly used material, in both homes and public buildings. It can basically be used everywhere.
Drywall - used in every room in homes and public buildings
“color for general rooms” — Lisa Bohart
Eric Stengel Architecture, llc
19th C. Classical Revival
Ideabooks2,525
Questions3
This is a Neoclassical design because it has large columns and a symmetrical design. It also looks like most public buildings because public buildings are commonly neoclassical.
“Colonial Greek Revival” — jacob1121
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BUILD LLC
Halladay Street Remodel
Ideabooks3,661
Questions7
BUILD was tasked with fully updating this neglected home and site to accommodate the owners’ lifestyle and young boys. Relying and expanding on our experience of redesigning and rebuilding mid-century modern homes, BUILD’s updates encompass all aspects of the home and site, including the interior program
to maintain its mid-century roots and form, while accommodating a family’s needs and desires for a home built for the current era. Photography by BUILD LLC.
“techo” — Leslie Lorraine López Leguizamón
Dwellings
13 Reviews
Prospect
Ideabooks449
Questions4
I have been struggling with what to put in our home build, finished basement. I'm trying to assess cost to do something like this. Can you help me assess that by sharing a per square foot cost "formula".
also very hard. It is extremely expensive to install because you have to hire a professional. This flooring is used in modern homes and also public buildings. I personally would not use this in my house. But it would probably be used in kitchens and bathrooms.
“Floor” — Lindsay Hill
Clayton&Little Architects
1 Review
E. 8th Street House
Ideabooks2,630
Questions3
Masonry - It can go anywhere basically. It can work in any public building or home.
MasonryThough you will sometimes see CMU exposed as the finish material, as shown here, concrete block is often hiding behind many other materials on buildings you see every day. In fact, block makes up most foundation walls that aren't poured concrete. A block wall is often covered by a finish coat of stucco
“Institutional feel” — tomharr
The Last Inch
6 Reviews
Kitchens
Ideabooks22,220
Questions12
I'm a big fan of adaptive reuse, of taking an older commercial or public-use building — in this case a onetime Carnegie library in California — and converting it into a living space. I enjoy seeing something antique or vintage get tweaked with contemporary elements in a way that still respects the original
“Cast iron rack” — rosaslparton
Schoolhouse Electric
1 Review
Schoolhouse Electric Office
Ideabooks108
Questions0
the amazing fixtures and the companies that had produced them. I was particularly smitten with institutional-style lighting that you'd see in public buildings and storefronts, like schools and shops. I liked how practical and beautiful the opal glass shades were, yet they had all — except for a handful
“love it” — Pamela Dalton
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