Sunroom floor- not too hot!
Steven Gore
June 10, 2014 in Design Dilemma
We have just purchased a townhouse with a lovely sunroom/river room seen in the attached photo. We are going to remove the carpeting and would like to tile the sunroom. Porcelain tile has been suggested for durability, but also because the room gets A LOT of sun and porcelain is not likely to heat up. I'm not a huge porcelain tile fan and was wondering to what extent limestone or travertine tiles would be likely to heat up? We don't want to burn our bare feet in the summer! Any experience or thoughts? Thanks! Steve
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Karin Madgwick
I would put film on the windows to reduce the heat and sun penetrating the room, then I would go with light travertine if that is your favourite. The benefit of the film on the glass is not only heat reduction but it will also stop fading of fabrics and sun damage on other furniture. It will also cut the glare so you can enjoy the view more.
5 Likes   June 10, 2014 at 5:35AM
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fredm51
Make sure the window maker allows films. Makers like Anderson does not
0 Likes   June 10, 2014 at 5:45AM
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Steven Gore
TX
0 Likes   June 10, 2014 at 8:12AM
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PRO
Pleotint LLC
If you are looking to help control excess heat in your sun room you should consider Suntuitive self-tinting windows. Our windows are some of the most energy efficient on the market. They tint from the heat of the sun so they are tinted when you need them to be and are clear when you don't! Suntuitive helps preserve your views, blocks harmful UV rays and reduces excess heat gain. You can check us out at www.suntuitive.com
0 Likes   Thanked by Steven Gore    June 11, 2014 at 8:11AM
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PRO
SOLARIS
Window film will take care of your issue. A lighter color tile of any material will not heat up as much. We work in plenty of tile floor sunrooms and I cannot imagine you having a problem with white or light colored tile, even if you do not install film. Good luck!
0 Likes   August 6, 2014 at 6:36AM
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auntkathy
Yes please use the window film, it does wonders and will help with the heat as well as furniture fading from the sun. I like wood floors, always in style, so why don't you consider tile which looks like wood.
0 Likes   August 6, 2014 at 6:46AM
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PRO
Action Specialty Contracting
Just to give you an idea, solar control films run about $9 a square foot installed. They come in a wide selections of tint shades and you won't even notice them. I also agree with the first commenters suggestion - go with travertine.
0 Likes   August 6, 2014 at 7:02AM
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fredm51
Applying reflective or decorative film to your Andersen® window or patio door glass is not recommended. When film is applied to the glass surface, it may cause heat build-up on the glass which could cause the glass to crack or break.

Andersen® glass has several glass (glazing) options available to meet your energy efficiency needs. For information on available glass options, see Glass Types Available for Andersen® Windows and Patio Doors.

I know this is America and we don't read instructions, but major window makers have website to check if window films should be applied on your windows or not. When it sez we do not recommend, it means they will not give you another window or have it installed.
0 Likes   August 6, 2014 at 8:57AM
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PRO
SOLARIS
If the wrong film is applied to the glass thermal stress breakage can occur. How do you know which films are safe? A professional window film company will have a chart to follow from the manufacturer of the film to know which films are safe for your type of glass. Thermal stress is typically due to too much absorption of the solar heat by the window glass. The breakage will usually occur on cold, sunny days where the glass sees a large shift in temperature very rapidly. The condition of the glass and frame, any shadowing on the glass and altitude are all additional factors.

Please keep in mind that millions of windows have film applied every year with no issues. If there is a stress point on the glass or a bad edge inside the frame the extra stress with film applied will bring out any weaknesses. If it were all the fault of the film every window would break...

Good manufacturer's will warranty the replacement of glass due to thermal stress breakage so you will not have to pay for the glass to be replaced or re-filmed. The Gold Warranty from Vista (www.vista-films.com) will match the existing window manufacturer's warranty for glass breakage and seal failure so you are completely covered even if the window manufacturer voids your warranty.

I personally have Anderson windows in our home and all of them have had window film for 10 years now. I have seen fewer window issues in the field for my clients with Anderson windows vs. just about every other brand. That said, the proper window film will make any window perform better.
2 Likes   August 6, 2014 at 9:16AM
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PRO
Action Specialty Contracting
Correct solaris - today's modern films do not cause thermal buildup, even with a heavier thickness security film. I've been doing this since the late-90's and haven't had one warranty call for failure of any kind, including breakage.

With Anderson windows, unless the original owner of the windows did a warranty registration in a timely fashion, there is no warranty. IMO, because Anderson voids a warranty, they would rather have consumers install new windows than make current windows perform better.
1 Like   August 6, 2014 at 12:38PM
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fredm51
Thank you. I learned a lot about window films in the last 2 comments. Installing window film on Anderson windows is super easy but when I read Anderson recommendation I when with the dark solar screens.
0 Likes   August 6, 2014 at 4:14PM
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