What pattern should I use to lay 12x24 tile in my contemporary fist floor home?
moniqueagosta
October 25, 2012 in Design Dilemma
Includes kitchen hall foyer all same tile
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Studio S Squared Architecture, Inc.
running bond would be my first choice.
October 25, 2012 at 8:23pm   
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Carolyn Albert-Kincl, ASID
I'd stack them in columns for a more contemporary look.
October 25, 2012 at 8:31pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Running bond would look wonderful but beware of the "cupping" of the larger format tiles. It can cause a huge problem with staggered tiles. You may have to do at 1/3 differential instead of 1/2.
October 26, 2012 at 4:59am   
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Dytecture
Yes, either one would be a good choice.


October 26, 2012 at 5:54am   
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Studio S Squared Architecture, Inc.
Deborah, I am intrigued by your comment and would like to learn more. What was the tile material with which you experienced cupping with larger format? How thick was it?

Why would the 1/3 offset (which I agree looks very nice as well) ameliorate the cupping?
October 26, 2012 at 9:28am   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Many large format tiles are slightly concave in shape and create some difficulty in installation. We have found this from different brands, different suppliers and different price points (from expensive to budget tiles) and both in square tiles and the larger rectangular tiles. These are porcelain tiles, not natural stone. The shape of the tile causes lippage that can be unacceptable (this issue has nothing to do with the proper preparation of the substate to prevent lippage) and is further exacerbated if laid in a running bond pattern as the highs and lows become visually more pronounced. One of the solutions that has been offered by experienced tile setters is not to lay the running bond at a 1/2 offset but rather the 1/3 offset. Another is to widen grout joints, which can be difficult to convince a cutomer to do particulary these days when everyone wants no grout joint if possible.
http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/archive/index.php/t-91745.html. Hopefully this link works.
October 26, 2012 at 10:22am   
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Studio S Squared Architecture, Inc.
Deborah:

This is great information, thank you so much for taking the time to post. I have large format tile in my own house from a company called Porcelanosa (ceramic tiles, mfr. in Spain). See photo below. I think these guys are 27x16. They are laid over a plywood subfloor which is supported by p.t. sleepers on a new slab foundation The sleepers have radiant heat tubing running in between. Very minimal grout joints and no cupping issues that I can see, but perhaps that is due to the fact that my structural floor is very stable.

I will keep your info in mind...large format is becoming all the rage and it's good to know the potential pitfalls. Thank you again!
October 26, 2012 at 1:53pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Steve, Beutiful floor and room.

Unevenness in the substrate causes the majority of lippage issues. What I am referring to is the tile itself is coming out of the box slightly concave (I think the standards refer to this as allowable warpage) and it is causing issues in installation. We just had a recent case in a contemporary tile that was a 6" x 24" which was to be installed on the walls in a running bond pattern. The tile setter started the shower but we couldn't stand the lippage so met with the customers and ended up cutting the tile down in size to minimize the impact. The tiles were cupped enough that the result was visible. These were nice tiles that met the industry standards, we just couldn't live with how visible it was, particularly in certain light.

If there are some master tile setters out there that can address how you deal with this, when the substate is properly prepared, we would love to know. Given the design trends, this is becoming more of an issue. Maybe I will post this in Pro to Pro as well.
October 26, 2012 at 2:26pm   
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Carolyn Albert-Kincl, ASID
That's fascinating information which all of us designers should find interesting. Thanks, Deborah!
October 26, 2012 at 3:30pm   
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Studio S Squared Architecture, Inc.
Deborah:

You are a great source of information, thanks for taking the time to explain the issue from your persective and for sharing your experience. Didn't know about the pro to pro page, will have to check that out!

Eugene
October 26, 2012 at 3:54pm   
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Deborah Butler, Brickwood Builders
Studio S, sorry I refered to you as Steve. Steve is another builder/remodeler that posts frequently on Houzz. I apologize for getting it incorrect.

Thanks for any help that folks can give.
October 26, 2012 at 4:30pm   
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Cuba Daugh
This is a bit delayed, but I just read this thread. My thanks to Deborah Butler (Brickwood Builders) for the great posts and information!
July 25, 2013 at 12:41pm   
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