Help me deal with this fireplace!!!
punkey90
November 29, 2012 in Design Dilemma
We've finished most of our basement family/media room remodel, but lack a couple of major details. This is a blurry pic, but the walls are a light grey. The curtains besides the fireplace are a bronzey-brown and are only decorative, there are no windows. the coffee table is not normally there, and we'll be replacing anyway. The fireplace is the problem. We painted the 2 columns the same grey as the walls just to see how it would look. We are thinking of tearing off the columns and mantlepiece, and tiling over the whole thing with a stone veneer/tile that's a little more modern like the 2 pictured. Opinions please?
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
PH Interiors, LLC
I love that you faked the windows - great designer trick. And yes, I agree, a stone veneer would be the perfect finishing touch. Good job!
2 Likes   November 29, 2012 at 10:53AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Thanks for the input. Found a couple more pics may better convey the rest of the room, as well as a before redecorating pic. I am scared to dive into demo on those columns. I'm tempted to just paint the rest of the brick grey and the mantle black or dark brown, but the resurface with stone veneer will probably look best in the long run if we live through it!
0 Likes   November 29, 2012 at 6:15PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
EB Interiors
the room looks great and would look even better with the stone face fireplace. go for it!
0 Likes   November 29, 2012 at 6:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
EB Interiors
0 Likes   November 29, 2012 at 6:24PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Yes the coffee table is going, love the round leather ottamon idea. I wonder if you can get a round one that opens for storage? Love the rectangular storage ottoman we have upstairs to corral all the blankets and pillows that we use while watching tv. Also thinking of removing the ceiling fan and building a light fixture about 4 x 4 ft square & about 8 or 10 inches high. I was thinking of covering the bottom of it with wood cross sections like the pic below. We did that in the frame above the bed as a copy of a similar but larger Candice Olsen creation. I thought it would be neat to cover the bottom of a square light fixture with those and randomly have round recessed spotlights mixed in with the round wood sections. Then maybe some rope lighting hidden on top for soft uplight. Hang the whole thing about 6 inches or so below the ceiling and frame in the hanging chains with a square wooden cover too.
1 Like   November 29, 2012 at 7:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
EB Interiors
you can def find a round ottamon that opens for storage...i think its a good idea to move on from the ceiling fan, but im not sure i follow what you have in mind to create for the lighting...pic you posted doesnt show lighting
0 Likes   November 29, 2012 at 7:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
in the pic look at the art on the wall above the bed. I built that by cutting cross sections of branches with a mitre saw and gluing them to plywood, then sealing it. Now imagine that on the bottom of a 4x4 foot piece of plywood boxed in about 8 or 10 inches deep to accomodate recessed downlights that would be randomly dispersed among the wood circles (maybe about 6 lights or so). then hung from the ceiling, stained brown on the sides. don't want the room to look to gimmicky, but I also can't find a light fixture I like that's big enough for my taste either. The fireplace room connects the bedroom in the pic above with the wood art.
1 Like   November 29, 2012 at 7:52PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
I would love to build the light fixture in a large kidney shape. But working with wood with curves is just too difficult. the top and bottom would be easy, but the sides would be difficult to cover. A veneer would work, but the square would be much easier.
0 Likes   November 29, 2012 at 7:56PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 2:21PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Thanks for the ideas Buechel Stone, I am leaning towards a style like the Fond du Lac Tailored Blend. What do you think about my plan for application: applying a coat of thin-set to the brick, filling in the mortar lines and let dry. apply another coat of thin-set trying to get uniform surface & let dry, then applying the stone on that. do you think the thin set will adhere to the brick adequately and give a good surface to apply the stone to?
0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 2:36PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Buechel Stone Corp
actually you wouldn't even have to do that. Using a Type S mortar on the back of the stone will fill in the gaps and still apply evenly. Been done tons of times. Depending on what you decide to do with the painted brick if you would decide to keep it you might have to add a wire lath over that to ensure the stone/mortar will stick. Painted surfaces and masonry don't play well together:)!

Here's a little video of installation if you want to see what i mean.

0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 2:42PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Great video, thanks! So not even a scratch coat of Type S is necessary? Just butter up the stone and slap it on? I wasn't able to listen in detail to the video yet, but saw the use of a bonding agent in the mix. Was that just for the scratch coat over wire lath in the video or would I use the bonding agent too? I am removing the columns with the painted brick anyway, so I guess I'm good there. Thank goodness i didn't paint it all! Thanks a million!
0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 3:05PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Buechel Stone Corp
The bonding agent just helps the stone stick a little better so I'd use it either way. Some of the cement companies also have Stone Veneer mortar that has the bonding agent in already. I've used it before - really sticky! Very helpful for installation.
http://www.quikrete.com/ProductLines/MorterVeneerStonePolyPro.asp
0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 3:10PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Buechel Stone Corp
... and yes you wouldn't have to do a scratch coat. The reason a scratch coat is applied in many situations is because the wall is wood/drywall. Mortar won't stick to that. Since brick is masonry you can go right over the top of the masonry and the mortar will still to it:)!
0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 3:14PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
awesome! I think I can handle that. I was dreading the scratch coats of thin-set almost as much as the demo on those columns. Thanks so much and I'll definitely consider using your product!
1 Like   November 30, 2012 at 3:44PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
nevadan
Your fake windows are terrible, and those big baggy drapes are dust-catchers. Also, there is no need of a ceiling fan in a basement, so get rid of that. Your fireplace is fine, it's the best thing in the room! If you want fake windows, there are many nice ways to do it. Who is going to use this room, and for what purpose? Once you have figured that out, you will know what to do with it.
1 Like   November 30, 2012 at 4:02PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
nevadan, thanks for your opinion. I don't necessarily want fake windows, but was looking for something interesting to flank the fireplace. what do you suggest? I think built in bookcases would look good there, but expensive & we don't really need the shelving. the ceiling fan is definitely going, did you see my thoughts on building a light fixture above? the room is mainly used for movie nights using the projector and screen pictured. we just wanted something more modern and serene. so you're saying just leave the fireplace like it is, with the columns painted and leave the rest alone? thanks!
0 Likes   November 30, 2012 at 4:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
All About Interiors LLC
I love the stone look. I think it will make the room more cozy and less dated.
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 5:08AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
I think your light fixture idea is very creative and could look great, as does the rest of the room. Since it is used mostly at night, you can go for a lot of dark rick colors and a variety of textures. Think nice cocktail bar or restaurant.

Perhaps anothr rustic accent would work, such as a real small tree branch (birch work well) set in gravel and plaster of paris in a small bucket (which can ge covered in burlap or fabric or a nicer pot) to replace the fake greevery. I have one in my dining room and it looks pretty cool. A local florist has a lot of these and they look great and you can even decorate them for the holidays if you wish.

Don't know where you live, but you could nab some branches from the local tree-cutting crew before they get chipped up, or get some from a friend with land, or get a permit fo cut your own Chirsitmas tree and greenery from the National Forest, and collect some branches there. Birch bark is good for crafts too, and you can dry out pinecoes and make them open in the oven.--A basket of them by the hearth might look nice.
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 5:58AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
hi victorianbungalowranch, (love the name!) that is EXACTLY the look we are going for. Dark & serene, with natural stone & wood elements. I love the ideas for the tree branches, I hate the fake plants we have and was planning on ditching them too. I love river birch bark. The pinecones are a great idea too! Thanks!
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 8:12AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
interesting browil, that is actually what I was considering especially painting the mantel a dark color like the ones you suggested. The only problem is if I do that, then decide to veneer, it will be much harder, because i will have to put up wire lath on the brick first, because the mortar won't stick to painted masonry. I don't have to worry about the paint on the columns if I'm going to tear them off. I had originally wanted to encase the columns in a nice clear wood casing like natural maple, then stone veneer the center area, but can't figure out how to do that unless I used sheets of veneer over plywood. I can't easily find solid boards that large in a clear, pretty wood. A nice clear birch plywood would work, but the edges are the problem. It would be doable to attach the plywood to the brick with anchors, but I think it will be very hard to get the vertical edge at each corner even, and I wouldn't want to use corner trim over them ( I don't think). the pic shows clear wood columns with dark trim similar to what I was thinking......
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 8:50AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
not sure what happened to browil's comment, but anyway. Does anyone have any suggestions how to do columns like in the above pic and have a nice edge on the corners? I could try to mitre the edge on plywood, but that's a long mitre cut and with the brick being uneven to attach to, I think it would be very hard to anchor the plywood panels to the brick and get the edges perfectly lined up....
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 9:12AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
Yes, that is pretty cool, but the space is much larger and more open. I actually like the painted brick and think if you sponged a brown stain onto the brick and the mortar to reduce the contrast, and maybe paint the mantel if you wish, it could look something closer to what you see in your head. And without the hassle of ripping everything out or trying to perfectly miter plywood and redoing cove molding.

Staining the mortar alone could help, especially on the hearth. And maybe you could paint the fireox black with heat resistant paint and add a nice rustic decorative firescreen.

EHow has directions how to do this. Perhaps the stone guys can chime in and let you know if that will affect changing to stone facing later.

If you do go for stone,consider something a little darker and more rustic and natural looking, with rusty and grey tones. And I would light it to bring out the texture (raking light from the side).
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 9:25AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
That is exactly what I would try to do next but Buechel Stone above said "Depending on what you decide to do with the painted brick if you would decide to keep it you might have to add a wire lath over that to ensure the stone/mortar will stick. Painted surfaces and masonry don't play well together:)!" I could do that if I had to, but the wire lath doesn't sound like much fun, don't know though, never tried it...
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 9:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
I like the brick fireplace before you painted it.

However, the stone veneer and other improvements will be lovely.
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 9:45AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Yeah Aja, I had a sick feeling as I put that first paint on with the brush, that I was making a big mistake.....but couldn't control myself! Hopefully, the finished product, whatever I do, I'll like better!
1 Like   December 1, 2012 at 10:09AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
A stain should penetrate the brick, not just sit on the surface. Maybe save the sealer for when you decide what's next. Stone and masonry guys--what do you think?

Wire lath or rock lathe isnt' so bad if you don't mind working with a trowel--can mud it in a bit at a time if need be and finish off with Venetian plaster if you wish. True, can be messy and time consuming..
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 11:16AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Ahhh! Didn't catch the stain part.... that just might work! I'll check it out, thanks!
0 Likes   December 1, 2012 at 12:08PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
aliceblackmer
Keep the fireplace. Add aged mirror to the opening above the mantle. Cover that whole inset with the mirror. Use 3 modern vases to accessorize. Replace the mantle board with one that extends all the way to the outer edges. Inexpensive, brightens and lightens up the area.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 6:51AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
jcsonnen
Perhaps the issue has to do with the focal point of the room. The furniture placement says "TV" but the decor says "fireplace." That may be why you are so dissatisfied with the fireplace? Putting stone on it may exacerbate the issue. Consider making a fireplace/TV wall with flanking cabinetry.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 8:02AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
kahartman
Either paint the rest of the fireplace brick to match the columns which would modernize it, ot remove columns and totally replace with your picks. I think either would work!
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 8:11AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
dofe
I, too, love the stacked stone look. We had our kitchen fireplace refaced in a stacked stone veneer and love it. The installers used the wire lathe. Honestly, though, since this is a basement family room, I would seriously just paint the brick or sponge it so just a little of the brick color shows through, and then live with that for awhile to see how you like it before spending money on the stone veneer. What do you have to lose except a little paint and one afternoon?
1 Like   December 2, 2012 at 8:19AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
decoenthusiaste
I think this concept would look great, and when budget allows, I'd add the built-in bookcases too!

1 Like   December 2, 2012 at 8:27AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
yytcm
Definitely ditch the purple drapes - way too dark and claustrophobic. Custom built-in bookcases might be out of the budget, but why not look at some open modular bookcases or shelving units that wouldn't have to fit the space exactly to still look good. Just type in "modular bookcase" in your internet search line and have some fun. If you use open units, the wall color behind them would help brighten up the space. I'll leave to other suggestions for the fireplace which sound great, and lighting is definitely key - you want a perfect media room when you are using media, but you don't want to spend the rest of your time in a semi-cave.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 8:35AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Jayme H.
I would paint all the brick the same color and remove that screen to do it cheaply/and maybe repaint the mantle. Or if money isn't a big consideration/re-do the whole face of the fireplace for a modern look.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 8:38AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rachelvrs123
Instead of those curtains, what about a mural of trees, branches or something from nature, this would give the room more interest and be a great focal point
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 9:15AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
rachelvrs123
here is an example
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 9:20AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
punkey90,

like the time I decided I wanted bangs and I couldn't stop cutting my hair.
1 Like   December 2, 2012 at 9:32AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
sassysandy3
I would only remove the columns from the mantle up. I'd replace and extend the mantle to the full width of the fireplace and put the new stonework around the hearth area and above the mantle. Or above the mantle I might mirror the middle part and put stonework on either side of it where the columns were.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 9:48AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Island Stone
Island Stone wedge claddings (vtile & rustic) offer some distinctively modern natural stone designs for surfacing fireplaces (www.islandstone.com)
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 9:55AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Distinctive Mantel Designs, Inc
Drywall (durarock around fireplace opening) the whole wall and put the LUXE mantel on...keeping it short.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 11:37AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Distinctive Mantel Designs, Inc
Drywall (durarock around fireplace opening) the whole wall and put the LUXE mantel on...keeping it short. Make wall flat without columns. I see that someone liked the drapes....I prefer that they be gone. Guess you will get too many opinions.
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 11:37AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
decoenthusiaste, good idea and I love that look too. But I've put considerable effort into the entertainment area on the side of the room so don't think I'll be considering that route. I built the cabinet to house the speakers & av equipment, and the canopy above the tv to house the projection screen with recessed lighting above the tv. I also don't think I'll go with fixed or modular shelving units to flank the fireplace as we don't need the shelving and more stuff to dust, even though I do agree it would look great. still wavering back and forth on painting the rest of the brick on the fireplace or removing the columns and doing rock veneer.......
here are a couple of pics of the tv wall, the second with the electric screen coming down. so you can see I don't want to ditch this setup.
2 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 1:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
impax
You have too many things going on in that room. Your fireplace is more traditional and the rest of the room is more on the contemporary side. No wonder you are confused. Take out the mantel and use the stacked stone all the way up. Ditch the columns, take down the drapes and use each side of the fireplace for art work if you don't want bookshelves. You have everything geometrical in the room. Add some rounds or curves possibly incorporated in the artwork on either side of the fireplace. Your idea of a light sounds like a lot of work and does not add anything to your room. Decide on a focal point (which in your case may be the media center). Keep it simple! Lucy Haines Interiors
0 Likes   December 2, 2012 at 5:16PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
impax, I like your approach. couple questions: 1. about focal points. there are really 2. when you walk into the room the doorway is to the right of the media center, so the first thing you see when you walk in and turn your head is the fireplace wall, then on around to the right to the media center. regardless, whichever we decide is the focal point. how does this change how the rest of the room is decorated? 2. I agree the light fixture may be more work than impact, do you have any suggestions for a center fixture for this large empty space? the tray area is approx 15x15. since there are 2 separately switch wires coming to the ceiling fan, It would be great to use 2 separately controlled levels of light at that fixture (e.g. up & down lights switched separately)

I think some cove lighting with crown molding about 6-8 inches from the ceiling in the tray with rope or led lighting would be nice, but a little hard to wire to the switches. and I would still need a center fixture. my idea is to replace the fan with a fixture now, then maybe add the cove lighting later.
1 Like   December 3, 2012 at 5:31AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
woops wrong lighting pic, but I love that one too!
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 5:33AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
impax
Without seeing your room, it is a little harder to advise you. The reason I wanted you to downplay the fireplace is it becomes the main focal point. As far as lighting, I like the pictures you have sent. If you would like a center light, how about a round drum light? There are many out there that would look good in your room. Usually they are more transitional as is your room. I am not sure about the switches. You may have to ask an electrical person.
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 10:45AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
joaniewurster
Hi Punkey,
As a design professional, I would suggest the following. There are different factors that are contingent on your answers and I will try to cover these issues.
- Resurfacing of the fireplace. Would you be doing this yourself or done by a professional?
- If you are doing it yourself, some of the advice given to you will not work. I think the Bruechel Stone product is a nice selection (boulder style), BUT this must be done by a professional. It would be over-welming for a homeowner. To do it yourself you would first need to remove your crown molding and mantle. Any suggestion not removing the mantle and putting up stone would look substandard. As a designer, I have redesigned fireplaces for many clients. Here are instructions, step by step that would work successfully and compliment your rustic transitional room setting.
1) Since you are familiar with Buechel Stone, use their "Cinnamon Bark Ledgestone." This product is sold in mesh sheets and requires no grouting. It also should be easy to cut. The color is also perfect for a warm, cozy, but sophisticated look.
1) leave the brick structure intact. This is your foundation to build off of. Remove the crown and carefully remove the mantle. The mantle you will be able to cut down and rehang later.
2) Cover all brick surfaces with cement board. This should be glued and screwed into position with cement screws that penetrate the brick. Also, don't forget to cement board the inside edge of your firebox. Otherwise it will look amateur.
3) Now you have a flat surface and a layer of thinset is applied.
4) Apply the ledgestone to the thinset. Of course you will need to do the proper cutting of the stone sheets.
5) After application, and dry time, you can use a rough file to tidy up any outside corner edges you are not happy with.
6) Cut down the sides of your mantle, put a base coat or two of a warmer paint color in an satin finish and reinsert in the recess above the firebox. Before reputting up your mantle, check with your city building dept for BOCA (building code restrictions) for combustible material allowances. Wood product/mantle distances are determined by the area the opening of your firebox. This is also why you are using cement board for your building foundation. Later if you want to sell your home, this will prevent any hitches in your sale.
7) Using a paintable, flexable caulk fill in the gaps between the mantle and stone and paint with your finish coat very carefully.

Now for the other details in your room:

1) - I would need to know your ceiling height but in any case, I would not do your idea for the ceiling. Combining lighting and wood can cause a fire. Remove your fan and just keep it clean and add recessed smaller spots. Also, put 2 small (4") directional eyeballs above the fireplace instead of one and add additional (1 per side) pointing to where your draperies are now hanging.
2) I noticed a bin with toys on the floor. Either build or purchase doored storage cabinets on either side of the fireplace after removing the draperies. I think the draperies are nice for a different room, but they should be a heavily textured material if you want to go with that. It would be more practical to have bin storage tucked away in your fireside cabinets. If you can't build them, buy them to fit as closely as possible to the space width.
3) find framed wall art that is almost as large as the space remaining above the cabinets. Preferably something with color and trees. It will bring the outdoors in and and color and texture. Color and texture is paramount with all the leather furniture you have.
4) Find a nice square distressed coffee table. Don't add any more leather (ottomans, etc.) to the room.
5) Leave your movie and flat screen viewing where it is. It doesn't work in any context above the fireplace. The space left after code restrictions and mantle is too small and especially too high for viewing. It would be ergonomically and anthropetrically incorrect.
6) that's about all other than furnishing and accessory details. One more thing: the rug should be big enough for at least the front legs of your furniture to resting on it to be the proper size. Either skootch the chairs and sofa in a little or get a bigger rug.

Ledger stone sample: http://www.buechelstone.com/shoppingcart/products/Cinnamon-Bark-Ledgestone.html
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 10:52AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
impax
The comments above are excellent! Follow her advise.
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 11:22AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
impax
The comments above are excellent! Follow her advise.
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 11:22AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
wow joaniewurster! that is a lot of great info, I'll try to address some of your points. I really appreciate you taking the time to think about my situation!
1. I would like to try to do the work myself. I am fairly handy, and have done some tile backsplash & flooring work, so I kinda know what I'm getting myself into. The material I have seen at a local store we like is similar to the pics below, comes in sheets around 8x16 or so. I am planning on removing the crown and mantel, and also removing the columns to make a flat brick surface. What do you think will happen if I try to apply the stone sheets directly to the brick with type-s mortar as Buechel stone suggests above? do you think it will not be flat enough to get a uniform surface, or that the stone won't adhear well?
2. the ceiling height is 8 ft around the perimeter of the tray, and approx 9.5 feet inside the tray. I cannot put any kind of recessed fixtures inside the tray. there are steel beams and framing galore above that ceiling and would be a nightmare to wire anyway. so I'm stuck with a hanging fixture in the center. I had thought of a round drum light as impax suggested, but so far haven't seen anything I thought would be large enough. I think maybe 30+ inches across would be minimum to look right?
3. usually no toy or other bins are sitting around. only pic I had handy after my son-n-law trashed the place with his game stuff.
4. I'll give the other suggestions some thought e.g. coffee table & art in place of curtains. Finding the right low cabinets & art will be crucial. might have to live with the curtains until we find them, but that would work.
again, thanks a million!
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 1:28PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
joaniewurster
Using mortar should be left to the experts. Also, why bother with all the extra work it would entail. Cement board is the best way to go. Your fireplace configuration with the columns isn't a problem. If you remove them, you're opening a new can of worms regarding your flooring needing to be patched and reapaired - big, big mess for a do-it-yourselfer. The color stone above isn't right for your room - to cold and white. Stick with the color choice I have sent you. The drum style lamp would be a nice choice. Look into commercial lighting products for the scale you need. 30" plus is good.
0 Likes   December 3, 2012 at 3:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Realstone Systems
What a great idea! Stone is the perfect way to liven up a room. And it's fairly simple to install, as well! The stone you chose looks just like our Chiseled Sand Shadowstone, or our Arctic White Chiseled Shadowstone. We have a couple more in that category as well. Here are some pics for inspiration. Good luck with the re-do!
http://www.realstonesystems.com/
0 Likes   December 4, 2012 at 6:51AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
midcenturycas
I had a fireplace we hated, I painted the all the brick the same color until I could think of a better option. I'm still living with it and it doesn't bother me as much. Until I see something I'm sure of and total love its working for now
0 Likes   December 4, 2012 at 11:21AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Ramona
I like the shape of this fireplace as is. I wouldn't demo the columns and make a mess at the base and have to deal with the floor. I don't think the fireplace is as much of an issue as you think. I don't know about the installation issues, but I would paint the brick first and put money into other aspects of the room. The fan is really throwing off the room in a big way. Your idea for a big round shade makes sense to me. Or stain the brick as suggestions above mention and see if you like it. You could still paint over the stain. I would not demolish the columns. The rug just seems wrong. I think if you do the light, stain or paint the brick and replace the rug, you will get much more bang for your buck.
0 Likes   December 4, 2012 at 12:26PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
I can demo the columns without messing with the floor. they just sit on top of the hearth brick and I'm covering up the brick there anyway and allowed for that when I installed the engineered hardwood floor. Been searching high and low for a light fixture to replace the ceiling fan that is big enough to look right without having to build something. Found this one in pic cheap, it's about 30" across. too bizaare?
1 Like   December 5, 2012 at 11:57AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
punkey90 ,

Love the light fixture!

When do you launch?

0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:05PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
well Aja, kinda hard to say.....;) planning on spending the day tomorrow making the fabric store/lighting store/tile & stone store/home depot/pier one circuit. That sometimes gets sidetracked with lunch, especially if the meal is 2 or 3 glasses of wine worthy! usually then our shopping trips either dissolve into either A. I just want to go home and take a nap or B. We giggle our way through a couple of stores buying everything in sight. Usually with option B, we get the stuff home and say "how in the HELL did we think this would look good?"
but I digress...... If I get that light fixture, I'll change out the ceiling fan friday. Thinking about waiting until after the holidays to dive into that fireplace, don't want to have a mess then, plus it give me more time to wring my hands about it, and look at a few thousand more houzz pics trying to decide what to do! ;) p.s. you REALLY like the fixture? I may have to have a little more wine to work up the courage for that one......
3 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:22PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
I really like it too!

I think waiting until after Christmas to wrestle with the fireplace is an excellent idea.

BTW, I like the dark curtains! Mayb a little uplighting in that area will make it look a bit less dark, or putting something there the downlights will catch could help, or just tilting them toward the curtains, will help to give a bit of dimension.
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:36PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
AN ADVANCED DEGREE IN SHOPPING!!!
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:36PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
Remove the paint from the bricks.

I have a few methods.

A heatgun is like an industrial strength hair blowdryer. The temp is much, much hotter, some are digitally controlled, and the airflow is normally lower. You can find them at hardware stores and big box stores (lowes,HD, Menards, etc), normally in the paint dept.
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:41PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
I am guessing sandblasting is not an option, so Peel Away ! http://www.dumondchemicals.com/
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:51PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
Or
Fireplace makeover done with Brick-Anew Fireplace Paint Kit in 3 designer finishes.
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 1:58PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Sandblasting? Heat guns? Chemicals? Girl, you've got more patience than I have. I'm more about immediate satisfaction. Think I'd paint it all pink before I tackled that! Seriously, do you not think it would look a lot better if I demo'd those columns (I think that will be easy) , tear off the mantle and crown and get some stone like this on it? If the brick was a little more rustic, I might like it better, but it's kind of plain solid red to me. Or I could just do the dab method, turned out pretty good for the guys on the right i thought....
1 Like   December 5, 2012 at 2:04PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
now the brick-anew is more like it! I'd rather dab than peel!
1 Like   December 5, 2012 at 2:11PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
victorianbungalowranch
Me too!
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 3:00PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
Aja Mazin
Or set your house on fire with a heat gun!

Stone would be great if you are up to big projects!!
1 Like   December 5, 2012 at 3:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
North Star Stone
I would suggest removing the existing brick columns so you have a flat surface to work with. If you like the stone, the veneer stone is a perfect application that can be applied directly over the existing brick with incredible results. There are many great suppliers of stone so your biggest challenge is finding the stone style and color that fits your taste.

I would also add lighting. There are two options. One is to put sconces on the fireplace itself so the light lightly cascades down the stone to create some beautiful shadows, or place can lights off center of the fireplace for nice even lighting.

A new fireplace grate adds a beautiful touch to the new finished fireplace. I will attach a before and after picture of fireplace that we completed that had a brick H shape featured that was then covered in another material to cover the brick. We removed the H, prepped the wall, installed a new beam mantel and stone without a mortar joint.

Also bookcases really add a lot to a room and creates a nice balance.

www.northstarstone.biz
or aandrews@northstarstone.biz for any questions about stone veneer for your fireplace
0 Likes   December 5, 2012 at 4:19PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Well, after shopping today and online last night, I now have 3 light fixtures possible to replace the fan. The 1 I mentioned above with the rods about 33 inches wide I ordered online. Then today I found this beauty. It's 24 inches diameter. Couldn't resist bringing it home to see how it looks in the room. Also have a welder friend that is looking for material to custom build one.
1 Like   December 6, 2012 at 7:47PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Doreen Schweitzer Interiors, Ltd.
I suggest getting rid of the side sections and facing over the brick with a 12x12 or a 12x16 slate look porcelain tile in gray tones with a touch of rust/copper color. A simple square mantle shelf could replace the mantle. This would give a more streamlined contemporary look. Those who say keep the fireplace as it is are missing the fact that the rest of the room is contemporary. I see a more bronze tone fixture but simple geometric lines and close to the ceiling. Try Hubbardton Forge.
0 Likes   December 6, 2012 at 10:18PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
PRO
Marie Hebson's interiorsBYDESIGN Inc.
Hi punkey90, Marie here.
I love the new stone you are contemplating. Quick question, is your fireplace a gas insert, or natural wood burning?

You may need to adjust your sub-strate if you tear this down and re-build properly if its a natural wood burning fireplace.

Below I have two photos. The brick was simply painted out white.
Added a more rustic mantle, because a painted brick lends itself to a more industrial look - so the raw wood always looks great.

Then you can play with your accessorizing. As you can see, same fireplace - two completely different looks using only furniture and accessories.

Ask yourself,
Is it the fireplace we are unhappy with?
What does the final result actually look like to us?
Find a picture of a room with a fireplace that you love
then work towards getting that end result.

Do what makes you happy - be in love with your choice, not just an OK for now.
You will always be happier with the love, Love LOVE than temporary fix.
Do it the way you always want it to be done.
I hope my images have inspired you to do what's right for you, good luck with your project.
1 Like   December 6, 2012 at 10:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
punkey90
Thanks for the insights Marie, very helpful ideas! The fireplace is set up for wood burning, but we have ventless gas logs and will probably never burn wood. Thinking of putting in an insert or glass doors for a more modern, streamlined look, but will at least paint the firebrick black.
We decided to keep the light fixture we bought and got it up over the weekend. Actually wanted a bit larger one, but we got a good deal on this one, and like the modern look and feel of it.
Also picked up a 12x24 porcelain tile sample, that's sitting on the mantle. Attached a pic of a similar tile. Thinking of using that for the fireplace resurface. It's around $4 sq ft compared to $20+ for stone veneer and we like the look as well or better. I'll get a close up of it, but is has a really natural stone look to it. Thinking of doing it in a running bond pattern and removing the columns for a flat surface.
Also having dilemna over coffee table replacement. Can't find a coffee table we like so we're thinking of going with an ottoman but can't decide on round,square or rectangular. Looking for input on that too! Due to the recliner mechanism in the sofa & loveseat and the furniture placement we can't center the ottoman/coffee table under the ceiling light fixture.
0 Likes   December 11, 2012 at 11:00AM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
joaniewurster
Stick with the stone. You need layers of texture and although the tiles are very nice, it is too smooth and will not create the proper balance in the room (because you have so much leather). If you had some fabric upholstery in the room with cleaner, tract arms for instance and a highly textured fabric, you could get away with it. Also, do not get a leather ottoman in any shape. That is way too much leather. Stick with the cocktail table idea. The price per square foot difference for the stone is inconsequential in the long run.
1 Like   December 11, 2012 at 1:53PM
Thank you for reporting this comment. Undo
impax
I agree!
0 Likes   December 12, 2012 at 6:21PM
Sign Up to comment
Related Discussions
Need help on dealing with this off-size farmhouse sink
The farmhouse Apron-front sink is wider on the top...
Need help dealing with stereo components and wiring after remodeling.
Note Hearth Rm.--remodeling this space, replacing carpet...
Need Help- Found this great deal on modern yet warm dinnerware ....
Curious if it will mathc well in my light gray kitchen. http://www.closeoutdestination.com/Zig-Zag-Dinnerware-Set-p/5582-16rd.htm...
HELP!! I need ideas for dealing with this trailer park wood paneling!
I'm new to this site, and so far I'm loving everything...
More Discussions
Living room with corner fireplace and tv.
Long living room and dinning room
Entrance hall / staircase wall help needef
This is the view of the hallway from my front door...
Help! What color should we paint the front door?
We have a painter coming next week and haven't decided...
english cottage
bottom line-I want to live in an english cottage. And...
© 2014 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™