What to do about the lava rock, and what color should I paint my house?
Mark Henderson
February 19, 2013 in Design Dilemma
I've run though a lot of ideas and I can't decide what color to repaint my house. Complicating thing is the fact that the lava rock probably needs to be removed and replaced. Some of the options I'm considering for the lava rock are: a different kind of stone, wood siding to match the existing wood siding, and tile.

My goal with this project is to update the overall look of my house, and make repairs since the lava rock, siding, soffits and fascia are in a deteriorating condition. Currently the lava rock is host to a squirrel's nest.

Any ideas?
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Mark Henderson
Also I plan to remove the overgrown tree that is to close to the house come spring.
0 Likes   February 19, 2013 at 10:59PM
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Mark Henderson
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This house is in a similar style and I like what they have done. Could it work for me? Will this house stay in style for many more years?
0 Likes   February 19, 2013 at 11:20PM
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PRO
Ironwood Builders
Mark, first things first. The stone you pick is a more permanent color and texture, paint works around it. Go to the local stone yard and look for materials that work with you existing brick (bring a big photo of the brick, close up). Pick a few samples and post the photos here, you'll get lots of feedback...ask about paint to go with the brick and stone...designer feeding frenzy.
2 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 6:31AM
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Mark Henderson
Thanks that is a good idea.
Have you seen many homes with three types of siding on them? I can't seem to find any. So I think I need to make sure that what ever I do I reduce the siding materials to just two kinds.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 3:35PM
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Mark Henderson
1 Like   February 20, 2013 at 3:36PM
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libradesigneye
Here's my take. You have a classic mountain house - a contemporary mountain house. You need contrast with the brick if you replace the stone and river rock is classic for a mountain house. Split face is too close to the horizontal profile of brick You can't make a tudor from the rubble profiles they will sell you to go with brick. River rock is a classic that fits your Mountain House with Modern lines best of all. The 60's mod block wall below - fabulous. Don't give up these classic lines - just bring them forward.

I'd pick a colorblend that was really warm brown and gray and taupe (brown-grey) - like camoflauge in the trees. Then I'd pay someone to stain all the brick a mid-tone taupe so the house would be more contemporary and uniform. I'd paint my board and batten another lighter taupe shade so the river rock would be the feature. The garage goes deep taupe. This will work nicely with the white windows and cheery red door and is drawn from the natural color of the boulder I see in the front yard.

I'd leave money in the budget to rework the bridge railings, and go to something industrial modern rustic in a raw steel finish. I've seen a great railing made of rebar laid at angles like crossing tree branches or reeds which evokes nature to me - couple that with a wide flat stock top and bottom rail and you would have an entry worthy of this cool house. Go to a metalworker not a fence shop. Ask what they can do with standard industrial materials to get a great look - google and take them some pictures and you may even save money from a fencing guy who'll charge a lot for curves.

If you really love the red brick and want to keep it red, choose a camel and rust river rock blend, paint your siding camel and use a core-ten finish on your bridge railing, even stain the concrete bridge buff to get more of a warm tone here. Change your door to russet red. Eventually paint out your white windows to camel or tan - more needs to change to make this work - your natural boulder in the yard is the inspiration for the more neutral color scheme above.

One final element that is worth the splurge - get some new outdoor fixtures from hubbarton-forge - get one size bigger than you imagine you should at the garage front and entry door. Raw steel finish for the first scheme, rust for the second.

If you need to rework your soffits and facsia, ask for post and beam and open eave details. Do them in a dark taupe to match the garage.

In the landscape, add more boulder groupings and don't cut down the tree, just hire a guy to thin and cut them into firewood for you guys.
2 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 5:35PM
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Mark Henderson
Thank you, you have given given me some very good directions to explore!
I agree that it is probably worth while rework the railing for the bridge and that would be well worth the expense.
I might try just replacing the rock with the camel color rock that makes up the wall in the front. I attached the only photo I have that shows some of that. (I'd just take a photo if it where day time)
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 9:01PM
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cyn222
Defintely start by removing the tree and praying the roots aren't already destroying the foundation. Remove rock and add some wood in a warm color.
1 Like   February 20, 2013 at 9:04PM
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Mark Henderson
I should add I don't know that I can keep that one tree, it is as old as the house and is the very biggest one I have (stands about 70'). One of the reasons I bought that house was I liked the trees so much. About a week after I moved it I watched it sway perilously close to the house during a wind storm, also it litters hundreds of pine cones onto the roof.
That being said I'll keep if I can.
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 9:06PM
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PRO
Ironwood Builders
Multiple sidings or facade treatments are common enough. Create a sample board of your desired (and existing) materials to make sure they work for you. As for rock choice, a river rock can look cool...but out of place if it is not in any way local...making a mountain home look indigenous supports the vernacular style. It needs to look like it growed up there.
2 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 9:13PM
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Mark Henderson
cyn222, Thanks for the idea. The same wood as rest of the wood siding?
0 Likes   February 20, 2013 at 9:17PM
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Donna Van_Atta
I'd paint the bricks and wood a satin golden tan,like sand.Then add the new stone in browns, tan, gold ,rust colors.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 12:18AM
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Donna Van_Atta
Paint door dark brown and spray paint railings black or brushed bronze.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 12:19AM
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Donna Van_Atta
Stain concrete too.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 12:21AM
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Donna Van_Atta
Painting the wood a darker color found in stone would pop if u like that instead of blending it with bricks.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 12:24AM
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Mark Henderson
How difficult/possible is it to paint vinyl windows?
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 11:29AM
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PRO
Ironwood Builders
Mark...it can happen. Problem is the adhesion and the way the windows work. If you have casements it won't be so bad. If they are sliders or double hung sash, the paint may have a tough time of it (all the sliding, either up and down or sideways means the potential for white to come through the paint). Thing is, vinyl casements are no that common. If you have a painter in mind for your project..or not, heck call a painter and get them out to give you a quote on the exterior, you need it anyway...get them to tell you if they can do it and stand behind their product. If it were me...I'd be replacing windows anyway. I'm no big fan of vinyl windows. I'll keep checking back, let me know how it goes!
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 12:02PM
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libradesigneye
Painting vinyl windows requires a special formulation for vinyl, and doesn't last well over time for reasons mentioned above. I don't know any painters who warranty them. Vinyl primer can be tinted though,and it is the sticky stuff that wont peel.

Replacing windows is a very expensive proposition so it is better to work with them, thus my suggestion for cooler taupes. However, lots of earth toned houses do have the vinyl - it just never really fits.. If you tried a warmer shade of white , even tinting the primer itself kind of ecru, just one tone difference would make a lot of difference.
0 Likes   February 21, 2013 at 12:34PM
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