Mexican tile removal from my hall and dining room
dianajg
April 10, 2013 in Other
Please help me with what I am afraid of is a big messy project- the front hall and the dining room of my 1929 English tudor has old Mexican tile cemented over the original hardwood floor. We would like to take it up and put in a new hardwood floor - I am afraid it was not a professional installation and the homeowner years ago just cemented the tile over the wood. Has anyone had a similar experience and any helpful ideas for this project would be really appreciated!
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BMF CONSTRUCTION
You have several options. First, you can just install a floating wood floor over the tile. The downside is that you will probably have a small (3/4"?) transition in floor levels to the other rooms since it will add the thickness of the floating floor to the tile. It will also make the bottom stair tread closer to the floor and require 1/4 rounds or some
base alterations and door undercuts. If the tile is set in a thin set on paper, it might actually come out fairly easily once you start chipping them out. If the tiles are set in a reinforced mortar bed (which may be if it was done many years ago), you probably have your work cut out for you with a fair amount of demo.
   April 10, 2013 at 8:07PM
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dianajg
Hi BMF- Thank you for your suggestions...I have been 'just living with' this tile and trying to accept it as just a part of the 'Tudor charm'. I should have had it removed I guess when I had my kitchen redone and they took up a different tile there. A floating floor appeals to me because it would be so much less messy and the tile IS cemented right over the old original wood floor and I wonder what would have to be done to that floor - I imagine even with alot of sanding etc. the floor would still not be able to be refinished (another project) ...would another type subfloor have to be installed before putting engineered wood over the old floor? If I had a floating floor installed aren't there problems with noise-sounding hollow, warping etc? Any more suggestions would be greatly appreciated-- what would you do if it were your floor? Thanks again!
   April 11, 2013 at 7:41AM
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BMF CONSTRUCTION
Hi. If you don't mind the added thickness of the floating floor, you can typically lay it on top of the tile floor without removing the old tile. I have not seen problems with warping or sounds with this application. If you chip up the tile and there is mortar that is well adhered to the floor underneath, it may be too much mess and cost to attempt to restore the existing floor, in which case you may want to cut out that flooring and replace it (also a bit of work). It may also be possible to set a floating floor on the damaged sub floor if it is fairly clean of the old mortar. I would want to make sure that is is significantly cleaned so there are no high points, etc.P.S. The floating floors that we typically install are a 3/4" tongue and groove.
   April 11, 2013 at 9:00AM
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dianajg
Hi BMF, Just wondered, have you ever had a project such as this where you laid the engineered floor on top of tile such as this. The tile is quite thick and not loose, and is naturally very uneven and not a smooth but rather bumpy surface. It is also coated with some sort of sealant -not sure if that makes any difference in the placing of the new floor over it. would you need to first sand the actual tile to lay some sort of subfloor over it, or possibly coat it with some sort of leveling compound first to insure a smooth surface before laying the wood floor? I am afraid this project is going to be very time consuming and the results may or may not be pleasing...Your comment about what may have to be done after the tile is removed- removing the entire old floor is daunting! Any other info or tips you can give me to encourage me to move ahead with this would be helpful...I am beginning to fall back into the 'do nothing and live with it mode'- Thank you!
   April 11, 2013 at 12:00PM
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BMF CONSTRUCTION
We have installed floating floors over existing wood, tile and concrete floors, and not had a problem. I would suggest having a local floor installer look at it and recommend, since I'm not able see it personally. The finish on the tile should not matter, and minor natural imperfections of clay tile should not be noticed under the wood flooring (which also has a foam underlayment between the wood and the tile surface).
   April 11, 2013 at 6:53PM
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dianajg
Hi BMF, I appreciate all the suggestions you have made on this project- I might add that we have been to see a few floor company represenatives and have gotten various answers on how this would work. I am not crazy about the difference in floor levels that a floating floor would present but the idea of tearing up the old tile seems to me to be a big, noisy, dirty job without any definite positive results and may even lead to the point of having to rip out the old original floor (not something I would care to get into!) . My husband is more of a risk taker and would just go ahead and do it- not me. He has been in some apartments with this type of floating floor and claims that there is clicking sounds when walking- with each step and the owners were unhappy about it to the point of redoing the floor. You say there is a foam layer under the new floor to prevent that sort of thing. Is it usually just laid over the tile before installation, or glued down? If the floor is not completely level, due to the age of the house there is possibly a slight sag in the room center- is that a problem? Once again, thanks for your answers...I suppose we will do as you say and contact yet another floor company and try to get a good idea of what we should do with this project ( which has annoyed me for quite awhile!)
   April 12, 2013 at 7:40AM
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BMF CONSTRUCTION
Hi. Typically, the apartment grade floors are the cheaper 3/8" laminated type, so that may be the issue. We use the 3/4" solid wood. The foam layer is laid on top of whatever is under the wood, and not glued.Usually, a small sag will not be an issue.
   April 12, 2013 at 8:34AM
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dianajg
Thank you so much for all the info BMF-I'll relay all this info to my husband and hopefully move forward!
   April 12, 2013 at 8:59AM
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