Wood Paneling Update ideas?!
cottageacres
April 16, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Recently bought a house with the location, size and yard we love, but are very inexperienced with design work. Hoping to gain insight and ideas for updating this wood paneling enough to make it feel modern, without a complete overhaul due to budget constraints. Love to hear some educated/contempory/imaginative ideas!
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cottageacres
This is a living area and dining area to the rear of the fireplace (walkway to kitchen behind).

Our first ideas are to paint the fire bricks a pale grey (chimney stack visible to rear also); polish the floorboards (yes, those dark marks are scratches) and perhaps cover only one or two walls to make the paneling a feature rather than the dominant design (and also cheaper).

I'd rather leave them than have a painted effect that looks tacky, so we are avoiding that 'cheap' option...

Carpeting may be too stuffy? So we thought a polish and some rugs.
April 16, 2013 at 9:12AM     
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mmilos
Cool space! Paint is going to be your cheapest option to give it a more contemporary feel, but it'll be a huge job.
What type of vibe are you going for? You said modern...but mid-century modern? sleek modern? rustic modern?

You could go retro-modern though by adding a large neutral area rug and classic modern furniture. Keep the paneling until you can replace with wallboard. Keep the beamed ceiling...I like the wood paneling color better than the current wood floors.

Antiquing the wood with a gray stain to minimize orange color is also another option.
April 16, 2013 at 9:20AM     
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cottageacres
Antiquing is an option I haven't seen before (googling wood paneling brought up many drywalling/painting options) so I'll do some investigating- I like the idea of taking out some of the orange.

I guess 'modernizing' means to me making it look like something not so recognizably dated. Not being design savvy I couldn't actually say what look specifically Im going for, or that will matter!, just less overbearing?

There ARE skylights, and these photos make it appear not too dark, but in reality the wood does make the room quite heavy feeling. All of the posted modern takes of timber walls are with either wider paneling or horizontal walls- more how to contemporize a new wall rather than offset a current one.

Im not even sure I could hang pictures on it without appearing tacky? We have a lot of timber picture frames...;).

So I guess even little ideas about what to hang/how to accessorize these walls might improve or make a feature of them. To be honest: while they are a little heavy, before I read reviews and related pictures of timber walls, I wasn't overly bothered, but by failing to see anything that can lighten the impact Im getting bogged down by them myself now!
April 16, 2013 at 10:12AM   
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cottageacres
The ceiling would remain, and one option considered was to drywall only a side wall somewhere, simply to create a large pale section to offset the remaining dark timber.

And thanks! I agree, a cool space, if I can do it justice! Our current furniture though that matches this room are big heavy leather chairs, which Im thinking may be a little much....
April 16, 2013 at 10:15AM     
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brody1313
I have been helping my brother w/a similiar home on a lake.....lots of wood walls and ceilings.......I encouraged (while holding my breath) him to take up the carpet and put down wood floors in a shade similiar to the walls....it made a huge difference....and then gave us a cohesive background to work with......so maybe think of restaining your wood floors and maybe putting more down in other areas.......I like your idea of painting the brick. fireplace....the shorter stone fireplace would look good stoned to the ceiling..........don't paint the walls ....the correct furniture , light fixtures and accessories will be very important.....choose well and you will have a fantastic place....can't wait to see what you do.............check out pottery barn and restoration hardware for ideas, also world market
April 16, 2013 at 10:28AM     
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libradesigneye
Leave the ceiling, paint the fireplace, take a warm neutral taupe paint / water it down and wash just one of your walls in a private space to see what comes of this - you get all of the grain and pattern, but the color becomes gray and taupe and modern. I would paint my kitchen cabinets in a taupe or gray also - lighter than you tackle the fireplace with but some color so they aren't so stark white against the wood tones.
April 16, 2013 at 10:34AM     
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cottageacres
I LOVE the idea about extending the shorter fireplace to the ceiling, and its not one I would've thought of (I was just looking at the mirror thinking I would need to get a more dramatic one or something to fill that space- this idea is MUCH better). This post has already been successful on that alone :).

Interesting that you mention taking up the carpet- we pondered putting carpet down, but thought that might be TOO 80's. My next step is finding software that will show me different colors in a room so I can visualize, and when I do I'll look at the flooring restained. It has be redone anyway so...

That's a great idea about the kitchen cabinets too (it doesn't show, but they are the same vintage as the walls and are very banged around so requiring repainting also). I naturally go for cool grays so Im very much liking the direction. My danger will be ending up with half the warm wood with the cool gray and making a mess of both, but I'd love to get an accurate idea of the end result through software of the warm neutral taupe paint idea, as its one I'd love the concept of.
April 16, 2013 at 11:26AM   
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cottageacres
This is another view of the kitchen from the shorter fireplace, with the walkway into the dining area behind the tall fireplace seen in the other picture.
April 16, 2013 at 11:30AM   
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cottageacres
libradesigneye, you haven't seen any photographs of such a renovation have you? Im super keen to see some before and after shots!
April 16, 2013 at 11:40AM   
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cottageacres
After looking through numerous design ideas Im starting to think starting with both fireplaces, repainting the kitchen and replacing the unfinished original window trims all around (we are considering replacing the dining area window with a folding glass door onto the deck...maybe. All ideas are pre-quotes ;-) ) the timber paneling may look updated enough? Is that naïve? Or will it still scream "dated family den" when we go to sell it? (It may or may not be a quick turn over property, due circumstances, not intent.).
April 16, 2013 at 11:46AM   
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zennifer
I'd paint the kitchen a nice green, sagey. :)
April 16, 2013 at 12:06PM     
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kellystevens
My entire house is wood also. At first it was intimidating but I figured it out and learned to love it. If you can manage to not paint or cover the wood, your house will retain it's uniqueness. Your wood looks like the real deal, not cheap paneling. Real wood shouldn't be painted in my opinion!

If you look at photos here on houzz and other sites, search for "Organic Modern" style. Over and over you will see wood walls and ceilings styled with simple furniture that is white, black, raw linen or caramel leather. Fabrics have lots of texture but very little pattern or bright colors, except in very small accents. Big, solid colored rugs are used to balance the wood walls. The shapes of the sofas and chairs are simple - no rolled arms or other decorative details. West Elm has a lot of stuff that is Organic Modern.

Grays look great with warm reddish wood like yours. The grays should always be warm taupe-gray. So painting the kitchen cabinets a gray, and the brick too, is a good start.
April 16, 2013 at 12:43PM     
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kellystevens
Also, this house is crying out for modern light fixtures. Check out lights from CB2 for ideas.
April 16, 2013 at 12:45PM     
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mrs1916
I like libradesigneye's ideas. cottageacres, if you are looking for an example of the wall washing, you can see an example on the show Sarah's Cottage. She white washed the knotty pine panels in the living room, and it looked lovely.
April 16, 2013 at 1:09PM     
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PRO
CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
I'd definitely would paint all the wood a bright cream or white that will work with the fireplace. That right there would make it look 50% better. I'd tear out the kitchen and would redo. That island configuration is odd.
April 16, 2013 at 5:18PM     
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PRO
Rockin' Fine Finish
if you have it in your budget refinish the wood to desirable stain color. a white wash won't work over the finished wood even to antique it you would need to remove the clear finish first
April 16, 2013 at 7:21PM     
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mmbroso
We had a room with oak tongue and grove on the walls. My husband didnt like the idea of painting over wood and wanted to install drywall....I search "painted wood paneling" on houzz and saw great pics!! We first used a de glosser then painted it with bm paint and primer in one, Rockport gray. It looks amazing! So glad we did it. You won't be disappointed!! Do the walls and then if you feel like it the ceiling in a couple years... Stick to white for the ceiling.
April 16, 2013 at 8:17PM     
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cottageacres
Sounds like the restain is going to take a similar amount of effort to a repaint. At this stage on reading everyone's comments we may lean towards the simple stuff first- many fixtures need replacing and the kitchen DOES need an overhaul- and try to complement the paneling, which sounds doable, cheap (importantly), acceptable for now. Depending on how successful we are with updating the surrounds, the timber may indeed become updated by default! I do love the idea of painting the ceiling as well with white, and leave the timber beams.

mmbroso, you don't have any pictures do you?! Also, how long did the whole process take, at approx. what cost per sq ft? (We have 7 large tall walls worth, plus fiddly bits in kitchen...).

Anyone have any thoughts on the 'feature wall' option to soften the area? Ie, drywall/paint just one wall? At least to start?
April 16, 2013 at 8:32PM     
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Ducktuck
WOW!!! CONGRATULATIONS!!!! I love your new home. I wouldn't touch that wood paneling. You could update the kitchen with some sleek minimalist modern cabinetry and I think it would be stunning, especially with a pop of color. I also think some natural stone flooring would be really pretty and would break up the use of all the wood. [houzz=
]
April 16, 2013 at 8:34PM     
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Ducktuck
One more thing to add. You have great height and wall space for large art pieces, and I think if you took advantage of this by hanging some beautiful large canvas works that it would make a big difference as well. If the work on the walls is updated then the walls will look updated as well (in my opinion).
April 16, 2013 at 8:37PM     
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libradesigneye
Since you have other priorities - don't drywall over anthying - that breaks up something you might adore later. For now, wait - you may decide to keep ceiling and paint walls, paint on ceiling means paint everywhere, wash on walls could work with either but you aren't ready to decide and that is ok. You can test with some of your cabinet paint on paneling bits behind the refrigerator (low, so if you don't go forward it won't be seen).

ps paneling of this vintage requires only rolling on one coat of paint with a little feathering at the edges as a wash, whereas painting usually takes two coats of primer then 2 coats of paint to cover - with this quanitity it is really a spray job - another reason it isn't quite as daunting to consider whitewashing / antiquing

pps it is ok to live with it, and consider how to incorporate your options over time
April 16, 2013 at 8:56PM     
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mmbroso
Cottage acres I paid my handy man to do it by the hour. It took him a few days because he was rolling it. he said it would have gone much faster with a sprayer because of all the grooves. Unfortunately I don't have pictures i cant them to load with my ipad...but there are so many on houzz.
April 16, 2013 at 9:02PM     
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cottageacres
Thanks All- Im starting to feel super positive that there are lots of options within reach, and completely feasible to update via kitchen and other neat ideas (stone flooring- love it) and not do anything drastic just yet. Very glad to hear some success stories and confident recommendations!! That's a great idea about the testing behind the refrigerator- I WAS wondering how to test inconspicuously. I love art and the artwork idea too- great excuse to shop for a work of art and much more fun than hardware shopping ;).

Feeling much more motivated than when I first posted- thanks!!! Im compiling ideabooks on the ideas here already :).
April 16, 2013 at 11:03PM     
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pivoines
Take your time, as far as I see , if you go slick and modern with your electric fixtures, it will already update and upgrade the look, the short fireplace idea to box in the top part is excellent and I would paint it all a cream grey white(stonework also).
Modern art work, would look great, I would do large prints installed museum style , which means that you measure 5'1/2" from the floor and that is where the middle of each of the art pieces are hung ,I would do it everywhere , the art need not be the same size , smaller pieces on smaller wall etc... but hung exactly at the 5'1/2 " everywhere , it would look spectacular.
the kitchen need to be painted to update it and I would take the cornice molding off the top of the cupboard as it is colonial style and dates them, I usually love glass knobs but again too colonial looking, if you want to go modern, change them to sleek stainless steel. I would be tempted to paint the cupboards a charcoal black, I love your house and I think it will look spectacular. enjoy
April 17, 2013 at 5:21AM     
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Brenda
The only thing making the space look dated is the panelling. The wood ceiling/beams/floor and the natural brick fireplace all add character and warmth and don't scream 1970's to me (at least not in a bad way). Even though your panelling does indeed look like it's a good quality, it unfortunately screams 1970's -- in that 'bad way'. I'm afraid my personal recomendation would be to rip it down and drywall. I think the result would be a stunning, modern, current looking space.
April 17, 2013 at 5:41AM     
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Susan Hall
our home was very similar to yours. We painted the wood (pine tongue and groove) between the beams on the ceiling a warm taupe semi gloss (primed with an oil based primer first so knots wouldn't bleed thru) and stained the beams (using an oil based stain) dark cherry. It has made a HUGE difference and I can actually see "where we're going" now! I The huge difference was painting the trim around the skylights-which look more contemporary and much larger too. also re-stained our "orange" stained (Lol) doors in the same cherry. They were very good and solid heavy doors and now look classy and the grain really pops. I painted all the trim in the house (aah-not finished yet!) the same beige color as the ceiling planks, but in a flat mat. Some of the trim work is fairly rough timber and the mat beige looked much better than white enamel, which looked awful. The walls throughout the house are a mostly slightly lighter beige in ultra flat mat but do have accent walls in 2 bedrooms. In the living room one wall was all wood -the LR had originally been a sun room so the wood was more akin to siding- ie very rough and overlapping! We sheet rocked over that and as the room was long and narrow (25' x 11') it had the effect of widening the room. Fortunately the other wall comprises 10 floor to ceiling windows.
April 17, 2013 at 5:47AM     
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Susan Hall
Please note that this isn't the room finished. We need to sort the ceiling light /fan etc etc etc!
April 17, 2013 at 5:49AM   
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PRO
Cozy Casita
Totally agree with anisa re the "WOW! " and with the idea of artwork giving new life to the panelling .... and LOVE the 'Scout Island' kitchen pic and that fantastic cabinet colour. Also agree with whoever suggested that you go for a retro feel .. perfect choice, particularly with the quirky layout of the kitchen ... which, I'm betting, will work well in that configuration. It's great that there's been no 'generic' updating .. no black granite or stainless steel appliances ! Love that ! It's a fabulous space altogether, very unique. Look forward to seeing your progress !
April 17, 2013 at 6:10AM     
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kristenodonnell
I'd probably start by stripping it all down, like you would a floor, to get rid of that oxidized polyurethane orange.
April 17, 2013 at 6:59AM   
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Tia
I love this style of house and would not paint the wood. I find it to be rich and full of depth that painted surfaces don't have. The kitchen received an unfortunate bit of updating--fixing that that would be my priority. Others may disagree. This style of architecture deserves to have clean, midcentury details, not raised panel cabinetry with detailed moldings and traditional light fixtures. The flooring is also something I would look at. There are four different surfaces shown in the pics-except for the stone on the sun porch (?)-all too cool or neutral to stand up to the rich wood of the walls and ceiling. Play with large rugs (FLOR carpet tiles are inexpensive and fun to work with) and the large canvases mentioned upthread. Live in the house for a while and be slow to make permanent changes to large areas. Once you have color and textiles in there you might find that the wood isn't so dominant. The stone fireplace is one thing I could see working with for a fresh look.
April 17, 2013 at 8:45AM     
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marjoriebianchi
The floor and ceilings are beautiful but together to much. Paint just the walls a light beige color or even a bolder color. Blue or greens would be beautiful. The long wall with the kitchen cabinits would be a great accent wall with a bold color. Leave the cealing dark. The floor has some dark tones to pick up the ceiling color. The wood is to beautiful to cover all of it. It will be a lot of work sanding the walls to except paint. Buying a good quality paint is going to help. I love Shermin Williams myself. Good luck. I can't wait to see what you decide.
April 17, 2013 at 8:54AM     
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yuril
You have a very special house, and painting or washing that wood paneling would dilute the special quality. Although I generally do not like feeling bossed around by wood, you have a goldmine in real wood there. I can't tell what those floors look like in person, but I would probably use a highly textured rug or carpet. From the photos, it looks like the kitchen is the part that does not fit, especially the cheap looking ceramic floors, and the cheap feeling cabinet design. Real stone or cork would make a huge difference. Aside from the bad fireplace, the rest of the house looks really chic and classy. I would consult a professional who understands how to use natural products, how to use the retro architecture and materials to your advantage (to make it contemporary rather than a time warp), and rely on fabrics and furnishings to soften the feel.
April 17, 2013 at 8:59AM     
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PRO
Oellien Design, Inc.
Wow, the architecture is GREAT. Really Great. I would leave every part of the wood walls and ceilings alone. The real issue at least in the photos is the wood floors that were installed and the fireplace. The floors need to be a different color and the fireplace is just weak and could be really wow. Please respect the wood and leave it. I'm all about painting wood out but in this case it never stops. This could be a real wow house. Love it. You need to work on the kitchen cabinets because they seem to come out of no where but that is an easy fix also.
April 17, 2013 at 9:01AM     
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PRO
Cityspace Design
Have you considered building out book shelves and framing out the FP? This could be easily done in a medium to light shade of paint. Then remove the island and put in a more functional shape. The splash back could be in a MCM glazed tile and the ceiling and other walls could be covered in great art for the time being. Flooring thru out should be same material, maybe a large porcelain rectangular tile~ One great chandelier and your good for the first party!
Cheers~
Lisa Heinz Cityspace Design
April 17, 2013 at 9:50AM     
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Susan Hall
to everyone who says leave all the wood, ceilings and walls, alone, I wonder if you've ever lived in a home with as much brown wood as that? Cottage acres- what style is your home on the outside? Is it mid-century or a 70s/80s ranch? I like both, but most updated MCM homes have moderated the amount of wood in some way.. Painted wood paneling on ceilings (if done properly) looks great .
Habitations Interior Design
Avante Interiors
Las Canoas Remodel Grand Room
Kitchen remodels
North End Formal Living Room
Farmhouse Dining Room
April 17, 2013 at 11:38AM     
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0825sam
check out the whole project...


April 17, 2013 at 11:42AM     
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PRO
Oellien Design, Inc.
@ Susan Hall,,,,,,,,great photo and I agree,,,,,,,,however I saw the upholstery and those softer items in the lighter colors that you presented in the above project photos. I just imagined it in reverse. Great photos.
April 17, 2013 at 11:44AM     
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Susan Hall
If I hadn't ivied in a home with lots of wood ie ceilings, walls, trim etc etc I would have thought like you, but believe me , you feel like everything is closing in on you after a while, especially on a gloomy day. We did live with it for 2 years though! I'm sure if it was a house in the tropics or somewhere with a year round warm climate it might be different. Having all that wood means you lose the option of doing a quick makeover by changing wall paint colors which is why we sheet rocked the wall. Our home is a lake home, so the painted wood ceilings I feel fit in with a beachy/contemporary cottage style. It's only 1800 sq ft. I also had to try and work with other elements like stained glass windows, loft areas with oak library ladders and reclaimed oak built in closets whilst on a very limited budget. Never think the house was built in 1983! Some of those pis of projects I posted are fabuous. I think my favorites are the las Canoas Grand room and the historic house, but I don't like the kitchen cabinetry I the las Canoas home. Looks too blah. I would have gone for painted or high gloss cabinetry
April 17, 2013 at 12:01PM     
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lkcsilk
Interesting and baffling to get so many conflicting ideas. I grew up in New England and was surrounded by very traditional architecture and design, but now am in Auckland, that by necessity (an island where resources are limited, or very expensive to import) is much more modern, but also where materials are recycled and reworked. My vote, for what it is worth, is to keep the natural wood back drop. Add in wood or cork floors for a seamless background. see the recent Houzz piece on paint colors with wood, but wood and white are a lovely contrast. This house would be awesome with a modern feel. Take the chimney up to the ceiling to elongate the room. Remove the dated chandelier and replace it with an orb - I'm thinking David Bainbridge, but probably a white would contrast more nicely and send nice shadows around the room. Streamline the cabinetry. If you need to be budget minded, then take off the crown molding (which is neither modern nor sleek), and replace the pulls and handles with something silver and simple. I would look into replacing just the doors on the cabinets to make them more modern, but the layout of the kitchen is a great flow and I could see it as a great place for entertaining. In the living room, I see a sectional, an Eames chair, an arco lamp and a scatter rug - like a cool hide, but then also wood bits like a wood table...all those brands are meant as inspiration, and you might be able to find a look alike. It really is a beautiful space.
April 17, 2013 at 12:33PM     
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cottageacres
It really is interesting to hear all the ideas and reactions different people have. Im a bit like a reed at the moment- each time I read a comment I feel myself going with it, and then I read the next comment and find myself flowing with that one too :).

I like clean and bright areas, so while I was initially very impressed by all the timber, I felt I needed some contrast to get back the clean bright feeling, even if I could do something that would make it clean and bright but still showcase the timber, which I have a huge respect for! The fact that there is so much of it is what is daunting. The fireplace brick is actually a lovely combination of beiges and blacks but disappears against the weight of the wood (in a photo by itself you can't imagine painting over it at all). So either the brick or the wood has to change.

The comments regarding leaving the wood I hear loud and clear- such a waste, right?! Which again brings me back to the just ONE wall solution- drywall perhaps the long wall to the left of the fireplace running from front room to the dining room perhaps, so to look into the rooms there's a clean bright background that makes the timber stand out? And as the wall would be the first area you see (given the photograph is from the rear corner) it would lighten the room straight away. Is that a potential compromise?

The problem is that whatever I do is irreversible- if I don't like the effect I can't go back and I've wasted all that wood! I haven't found any software that allows me to upload a photo and change the colors in mock renovation...

I didn't realize about crown molding- if that's what's giving me the dated feeling I will definitely look at alternatives. Anything too sleek is going to look out of place in the house though.

With regard to the house itself- very non-special. 60's built in an old wooded neighborhood, on just over an acre, with little to no curb appeal ;). So its not until you get into the house or walk around the heavily gardened yard that you fall in love with the place. Pale cabinets in the kitchen I felt were a real plus, so was going to simply redo the cabinets in a similar color... I see different opinions about that too! We would love to redo with granite tops, but I can't see the black speckled granite I love and am used to fitting in... The existing benches are very tacky and cheap looking up close! And the tiles.... HAVE to go. Perhaps extend the timber flooring all the way through? I planned on replacing the existing carpet, AND the dodgy sliding door and slate next to the kitchen is going to disappear...

Im writing a list of all the things I'd like to change/need repair (there's a lot- most of the windows need replacing, doors/laundry/2nd bathroom, carpets etc) and then going to prioritize them. I haven't decided on the timber, which will probably mean Im going to put it lower priority now until I move in and then get more of a feel for it. There are some less drastic changes I can make to see if they come off rather than commit to a large scale overhaul.

Again, love reading the different comments and ideas!
April 17, 2013 at 10:55PM     
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PRO
Cozy Casita
To see your place painted, just use the room painting tool on the Sherwin Williams website .. It lets you upload your pics and change any walls you want ... from wood to any color under the sun !
April 18, 2013 at 2:37AM     
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Susan Hall
Lol- sounds like our home ie little or no curb appeal but fantastic lot in an older treed lake neighborhood. Have you seen this site? http://nakedkitchencabinetd.reachlocal.com/?scid=367099&kw=3419733
I have seriously considered these doors as a cheap, temporary fix. Our kitchen is small and quite enclosed and has a level beamed ceiling with a loft area above. Don't have the budget to take out the loft. The kitchen was re-done just before we bought the house and they went for light cherry traditional style cabinets which look completely out of place and make the kitchen feel darker. We do have silestone counter tops though and I've tiled the splashbacks with white subway tiles and a plale glass mosaic border .I cringe at the thought of painting the cabinet doors because they're solid cherry, plus I don't like the style but could probably sell them.
April 18, 2013 at 9:52AM   
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cottageacres
Cozy Casita- thanks for the Sherwin Williams visualizer tip- am about to get started on that now!
April 18, 2013 at 2:26PM   
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cottageacres
Susan, I hadn't seen that site, so another great tip as I followed the links to the 'finished' kitchen cabinets :). Im realistic now: my years of dabbling at DIY have paused as parenting responsibilities take over... nothing that requires sanding or painting of multiple areas! Im definitely looking at the finished cabinets to see if the cost of getting someone to refinish the existing ones isn't probably the same.

I had a good look through the kitchen again yesterday and its actually quite serviceable- for me. So perhaps any cost of remodeling (except for the finish) may be contrary to how someone else would want it and a potential waste. Am very excited about looking through ready to hang quick fix options!!
April 18, 2013 at 2:33PM   
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cottageacres
Ok- Im now considering how long it takes to prep and paint each kitchen door ....
April 18, 2013 at 2:42PM   
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PRO
Rockin' Fine Finish
Clean them with tsp lightly scuff sand them clean them from dust prime them with oil base primer let them dry lightly sand them again clean from dust and paint will oil base paint satin impervo from Benjamin or advanced also from Benjamin it's a emulsion paint both great for cabs
April 18, 2013 at 9:25PM     
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mveasey
Love your house and the wood paneling, but agree there is tons of it and a little overwhelming... How about accentuating the crossbeams, either with paint (dark or light) or cover them with pre-made drywall beams, that you could technically take off again. The vastness of the wood needs some restraining, otherwise it will be overbearing and dominate everything.
April 18, 2013 at 10:25PM     
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mveasey
Here two photos
April 18, 2013 at 10:33PM     
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Susan Hall
I don't mind the style of your kitchen cabinets (minus crown moulding!) -at least they have straight lines- our upper cabinets are eyebrow style. People eem to have good results with Rustoleum cabinet transformations http://www.houzz.com/rustoleum-cabinet-transformations
You could also see how much it would cost for a professional to spray paint them? Good Luck!
April 19, 2013 at 9:47AM   
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Susan Hall
Had to post this picture. I was looking for options to cover our beams in the kitchen area as they are very rough timber and impossible to stain with the oil based cherry stain I used in the LR. A severe sanding would probabably help, but I don't want to do this because of all the orange dust it'll create. Was thinking about covering them with smoother wood instead. http://www.fauxwoodbeams.com/img_catalog/beams_general/design/woodland/29.jpg
April 19, 2013 at 11:26AM   
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Susan Hall
Here's some more pics showing how good mixes of wood and paint can look.
[houzz=tilden living room]
[houzz=Bruce D. Nagel Architect]
April 19, 2013 at 11:34AM     
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trixiebelle08
Consider yourself lucky - our wood panelling is set on an angle so I can't paint it a fresh shade of white to give it that beach house look (I think it would look ridiculous). Whilst not a huge fan of wood panel I actually quite like yours, I think it gives off a warm ambience. All the best! - Tania
April 21, 2013 at 2:12AM     
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nina47
All that wood is really overwhelming and personally I couldn't live with it. The ceiling on my top floor was covered with pine so I had the painter do a light white wash over it, meaning the wood grain is still visible through the slightly transparent white. The walls are white plaster and the flooring sisal. Looks really nice.
April 21, 2013 at 4:57AM     
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mbjtx
Paint, paint, paint that paneling! We had a living room with not so great paneling and a coat of Kilz and a cottage white and voila, the room looked like a sunroom rather than a dungeon! Soft gray would also be a good color choice- very IN right now. Good luck!
April 21, 2013 at 7:53AM     
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cmu204
Argh! Lost my comment. A quick recap:
You have an amazing space.
As I see it:
1) floors are lighter than walls/ceiling; makes it feel upside down. Floors should be darker.
2) the fireplaces' textures would pop more next to drywall. Panelling doesn't offer enough contrast. Drywall the two fireplace walls, leave rest alone.
3) Kitchen doesn't go: look for modern slab doors to replace. IKEA doors would work, though you might want different handles.
4) "Rustic modern" or "organic modern" would add contrast and appeal. Bring in elements like an antler chandelier (sounds outrageous but can be quite beautiful) or one of those big round bronze ones that looks like it came out of a castle. Decorate with pieces of driftwood or metal that looks hand-forged (these would be great cabinet pulls for the kitchen area, for example).

Good luck: I envy you the possibilities!
April 21, 2013 at 8:49AM     
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Jean Tuck
I have wood panelling , is tacky.So painting it white or cream with give you a definete lift.I painted my dining rm a dusty sage green and loved it in there, not finished trim boards and such but one thing at a time.Have beadboard halfway up in white justneed final trims. want new wood looking linolium in there for easy clean since its directly off most used front door. Rugs to much cleaning involved , costly.As I thing a little longer I would probably go to a beige color for your walls .
April 21, 2013 at 8:53AM     
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ccargogh
The wood on the ceilings and walls is great. The flooring appears to be run-of-the-mill oak. Consider painting the floor or having it coated with epoxy. White would be very modern, or a light turquoise would yield that look that is poplular now. Cork flooring would be great. But the ceilings are nicer than the floor.
Like Anisa Shattuck said above, big areas can be brightened and covered easily with oversized art. If you don't like making it yourself, and shopping for nice pieces are budget breakers, 2x2 frames stretched with canvas and gessoed can be painted by friend/neighbor/relative with some creative thoughts. Hang the blanks, then have a painting party.
The wall with the upper opening behind the kitchen island looks like regular plywood paneling. It would be a good candidate for drywall and paint. If the cabinets were painted a silver or grey finish, the black countertops would fit well with the remaining wood tones. If those folding doors stay, painting them the same or a shade off the cabinetry would eliminate some more wood. Nice place.
April 21, 2013 at 9:49AM     
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cindykeller
Looks like my original cottage look, we painted the panelling a soft taupe and then the trim white, it looked fabulous, it not a tacky option. We then did that in our current home as a temporary measure and it also looks great. It almost enhances the panelling. I don't think you would be sorry at all !!!
April 21, 2013 at 10:03AM     
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deepistol
My vote is paint all the wood walls and ceiling first. It will be the best bang for your buck and have the most impact on the style/feel of the house. Once painting is done, you can decide whether the big fireplace needs to be painted or not. It may look quite nice as is. You could also get someone to install a large, chunky wood mantle to the fireplaces to "beef them up"
Next, I would find some great light fixtures that complement your style (which can also be done affordably if you shop around) That track lighting needs to be updated and you need to find a chandelier that is large enough for the space in the kitchen and is a "showstopper".
I would eventually take the hardwood throughout the kitchen and family room for continuity. Then worry about the kitchen later. Maybe change out the knobs right away for a quick fix to suit your style.
These pics, to me, show how the light walls/ceiling can be still very homey and inviting and fresh.
You must have some DREAM photos saved in an idea book that you can look to now to reiterate in your mind what your favourite style tends to be. All the photos I have shown here come from my own idea books. Trust your instincts for your style. Find a few favourite looks and then go from there. Natural wood? Painted wood? Bright colours? Soft colours? White kitchens? Dark kitchens? One of the pics shows my kitchen renovated. It kind of goes with all the other pics to show that I obviously have a "type" .
Enjoy your new home. I think it sounds wonderful. Such an exciting time to realize some of your dreams.


Traditional Bedroom by Other Metro Media And Blogs The Lettered CottageContemporary Kitchen by Portland Interior Designer Jessica Helgerson Interior Design
April 21, 2013 at 12:45PM     
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deepistol
[houzz=
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April 21, 2013 at 1:11PM   
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April 21, 2013 at 1:14PM     
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amgolla
Potentially great space, but too much wood, and too much of a split "all wood on walls/top + all white cabinets/floors." I think there are many roads you could go but to me you have to cover some of the wood AND get rid of some of the white - I would leave ceiling but paint beams and side wall at least on right if not all around; paint cabinets to non-white neutral or color depending on taste, and replace white tile. And you need something on the walls (art - or others have suggested extending fireplace) plus furniture. Or you could leave wood walls and paint ceilings. Most contemporary solution would probably be painting everything, or leaving only one wall.
April 21, 2013 at 7:29PM     
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pearldiver
Could you switch lanes here .. learn to love the wood but remove/alter the elements that fight it -- fireplace (scale, material and color), white country kitchen cabinets.. why here? Seems to me that the white in the kitchen is the problem, not the wood. I think you will regret it if you paint the wood. Huge art will make wood walls look very intentional.
Not sure gray fireplace will work with warmth of wood. Cool vs Hot will struggle.
April 21, 2013 at 8:34PM     
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Marie-Josée
I have a feeling that the problem here is not the wood paneling, but the wood floors... Would it be a possibility to paint the floor a color that would be similar to the fireplace bricks ? I wouldn't touch the paneling or the fireplace, since I think they are the best assets of your house ! Good luck !
April 21, 2013 at 9:24PM     
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johnnigirl
Beautiful home, I would take the wall with the small fireplace and have built ins put in to the ceiling, plan and measure for TV, stereo, books, &plctures. Paint to match kitchen cupboards, use great colors, yellow,red,orange, teal in art on the walls and throw pillows. If you go wirh the gray go warm gray, and maybe think darker on lower cupboards, light on top &around fireplace.
April 21, 2013 at 9:46PM     
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Tiffany Chin
Wood panelling is such a heated discussion! I almost started crying when we had to dry wall over a part of it due to a leak from an upstairs bathroom. It took a while to figure out how to hang art on the wall. We went with ashanging system which replaced the crown molding and uses wires to hang the art which is really easy to adjust. Our Eichler has the original redwood ceiling with a grey pickling and we have black beams which I really like, but all of this is subjective. Do what makes you happy, just think about it and don't do anything you can't take back hastily! Iva attached a couple of photos of our living room. Lighting also makes a huge difference.
April 21, 2013 at 9:49PM     
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Helga Simmons Interior Design LLC
How about painting the floor a dark color, espresso or black. Then get a shiny contemporary gray kitchen. On the walls I see some very large oil/acrylic canvases, no frames. Run black track lighting along the ceiling in key areas. Get a lighting designer in there, after you have decided on the furniture layout. Lighting is very important here. Also, I would not paint the fireplace brick.
April 21, 2013 at 10:13PM     
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gaislgrl
I lightly sanded, primed & painted my oak tongue & groove paneling & it looks fantastic. For staging purposes I recently repainted my living room & hall Benjamin Moore Pewter & I absolutely love that shade of grey. It's a very classy contemporary look that updated my 60yr old house. I plan to use it again in my new house. Good luck!
April 22, 2013 at 6:21AM     
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Joni Koenig Interiors
I agree with drywall over some of the wood...perhaps the fp surround. Love to see you change those floors to a larger tile/stone module...ie 18 x 18!
April 22, 2013 at 6:25AM     
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marshall_street
Menton, a restaurant in Boston, has a very interesting design element separating the lobby from the dining room. They seem to have wrapped a pillar with stacked crown molding. It's a very cool modern look, very unique, and wouldn't be expensive. This is the best pic I could find, from http://mentonboston.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/home_01.jpg
April 22, 2013 at 7:52AM     
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aniluap2
I am a lover of painted wood but in your case this wood paneling is the real thing! It is beautiful and defines your home. I think you should leave it as is and paint the kitchen cabinets as suggested so they are not such a stark contrast. Do not paint the stone fireplace as it goes nicely with the wood but carrying it go the ceiling would make it more dramatic . Too bad they did not use the same stone on the other side. Is it possible to face that one with the same stone veneer?
April 22, 2013 at 9:25AM   
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Helga Simmons Interior Design LLC
I think you should definitely cover the whole wall of the small fireplace with stone. Similar to this picture.


April 22, 2013 at 9:53AM     
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Helga Simmons Interior Design LLC
Do a simple fireplace. No mantle.
April 22, 2013 at 9:54AM     
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Helga Simmons Interior Design LLC
Ii have just remembered something else: I had a wood paneling, very much the color of yours, years ago in another house. I didn't want to keep it, but my husband did. So we made a compromise: I will wallpaper over it and if you don't like it, we will remove it. We put grasscloth over it, and it was lovely and he liked it.
That's what you could try: Wallpaper can be removed. So try one wall with that.
April 22, 2013 at 2:39PM     
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Helga Simmons Interior Design LLC
That paneling I just mentioned was actually very nice wood. But then, in the basement in that same house, we had some very ugly paneling. I painted over that one, since I never wanted to see it again. It was very nice after that too. Of course you saw that there was wood paneling underneath, but it didn't matter. It looked good.
April 22, 2013 at 2:41PM   
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arscarbrough
I haven't read all of the comments, but I agree with you that the walls and ceilings are too orange. It looks like your fireplace, wood floor, kitchen tiles, and kitchen cabinets all are shades of taupe. I think that I would try to bring the orange wood into harmony with those elements, possibly by white-washing (or in this case, taupe-washing). Then you will have a nice, neutral background to decorate however you like.
April 22, 2013 at 11:41PM   
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beesknees2260
You have a lot of responses. I will give my opinion. Feature the paneling. Do not paint. Remove track lighting and kitchen light. Paint the cabinets and change the big island and all the flooring. Run the stone to the ceiling on the fireplace. I would go with a lake cabin decorating feel if you like that.
April 23, 2013 at 2:43AM     
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jenna3773
What a great space! I was excited to see this because we had a similar panelling dilemma with our house....which took us over 3 years of living within to decide what to do with it. We even have the ceiling beams like you do.

It looks like your panelling is in really good shape. I know it sounds crazy/tacky to paint panelling (I was really against it at first), but what we decided to do was only paint a few walls and leave a wall of paneling to keep that warm feeling. We had it professionally painted so that it was sanded/primed/done properly with the best paint (I've only painted regular drywall). The result was amazing and we are so happy that our space is lighter but kept that warm log-cabin feel that we love (yours is a bit more contemporary a space than ours, but I think you can do the same).

In your space, I would paint the two far walls a light color (we used a light gold tone....it really brings out the wood tones, still kind of neutral, but adds some color), leave the side walls alone (the walls that the kitchen cabinets are on), and paint the ceiling a shade lighter than what you use on the walls, but leave the beams alone! Does that make sense?

I will send you a few pics of our space if you are interested :)

Good luck!
April 23, 2013 at 3:21AM     
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jenna3773
To clarify, by 'far walls' I mean all the walls that are parallel to the wall with the two-sided fireplace wall, including that wall. You may want to see how that looks before getting into painting the bricks, because you may not have to once you see the result!

Also, I agree with some others that you should do the floor in the same wood tones as the panelling.
April 23, 2013 at 3:28AM     
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Susan Hall
agree with cmu204 re the option of IKEA cabinet doors. I really like some of their accent colored doors-the light blue and frosted glass. I got all excited at the thought of putting new , modern flat doors on our kitchen cabs, but when I got home and measured they don't do doors the same size as some of ours.
I found painting wood paneling , although time consuming, easier than painting sheet rock. I sanded and primed with an oil based primer and then used a semi-gloss acrylic paint. It really does look beautiful and not tacky at all. Before, the ceiling was yellowy/orange stained and the floor has terracotta tiles so there was little definition and as someone said, floors should be darker than the ceiling. Now we have a lovely contrast and the dark cherry beams stand out stained cherry against the taupe tongue and groove.
April 23, 2013 at 6:27AM     
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cottageacres
Very much appreciate the inputs. I first felt overwhelmed by the pull in different directions, but came to realize that its the same question as 'how long is a piece of string'. Its going to vary according to who you ask!

What has been invaluable however is finding my reaction to different ideas. I've discovered there are some that Im more drawn to than others, and that's not right or wrong (which is what you tend to think there must be when you don't have any experience).

Excellent photos and painting tips, and the various experiences and successes are a fantastic inspiration- thanks! I'll post our plans soon ;).
April 24, 2013 at 8:01PM     
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cottageacres
mveasy- love, love, love that wood wall and softer paint pic. I can't add it to my ideasbook... do you have the link?
April 24, 2013 at 8:11PM   
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cottageacres
Susan Hall- great range of photos there to visualize some options- definitely adding them!
April 24, 2013 at 8:13PM     
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cottageacres
deepistol- thanks for yours also- added several of those too. Im not sure if the kitchen will work in or clash but that's exactly the style I like.
April 24, 2013 at 8:15PM   
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cottageacres
(And sells me on the idea to redo the kitchen with timber floor... I think?! Can I complain about too much wood and then go to add some more?!).
April 24, 2013 at 8:16PM     
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cottageacres
If I may ask one more question: is it feasible to strip back a painted wall and restain if I felt it was wrong?
April 24, 2013 at 8:38PM   
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zennifer
Not really...i'd not paint something I thought I would ever want natural wood again. I've stripped a LOT of paint off wood in my old house renovations, and it is a huge ordeal...especially if there are nooks, crannies, or grooves/beads in the wood. Dental picks are the best for the really hard bits.

Your BEST bet for being able to change back would be to clean it and shellac it with a few coats before painting. You'll still spend hundreds of hours with a heat gun or toxic chemical strippers stripping the paint off, but it will come off a bit easier.

Sorry I can't give you better hope for easy changes back and forth! What about hanging sheets/huge swaths of fabric in your chosen colors on the walls to affect a color change to see if it's right before painting? Not inexpensive, but undoable...
April 24, 2013 at 8:44PM     
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Marie-Josée
If you ever want to have wood again, I'd suggest not painting it... I've stripped only some small furniture to know it's a pain in the a**...
April 24, 2013 at 8:47PM     
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livewellliz
When we purchased our house, it was paneling everywhere! A technique we used in another home with paneling was joint compound. Joint compound is not expensive, and it fills the grooves. Standard paneling takes 2-3 layers over the grooves only, removing as much of the excess as possible; drying between each layer application. Sand smooth. Apply primer and paint. I would definitely apply this treatment to the walls and leave the ceiling as is giving the rooms a warm richness. Below are a couple of rooms we have done. The kitchen had very deep wide grooves that needed many coats but I also texturized the whole room using a Venetian technique- flattened down. I highly recommended it for paneling woes.
April 24, 2013 at 9:18PM   
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livewellliz
When we purchased our house, it was paneling everywhere! A technique we used in another home with paneling was joint compound. Joint compound is not expensive, and it fills the grooves. Standard paneling takes 2-3 layers over the grooves only, removing as much of the excess as possible; drying between each layer application. Sand smooth. Apply primer and paint. I would definitely apply this treatment to the walls and leave the ceiling as is giving the rooms a warm richness. Below are a couple of rooms we have done. The kitchen had very deep wide grooves that needed many coats but I also texturized the whole room using a Venetian technique- flattened down. I highly recommended it for paneling woes.
April 24, 2013 at 9:42PM   
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rocoad
You don't want to paint it and then strip it! You would never get it to look like the original because the paint would go into the knots and grooves, etc. of the paneling. It would also be a horrible job! If you're going to paint I think you need to commit to it. I just read through all the comments. As always, there are very differing opinions, and like you said, there isn't just one right answer. With that said, here are my thoughts! I would almost always say to paint the wood paneling, but in this case, it looks like you have the real thing here. I notice that the board widths on the walls are different than on the ceiling. Are the walls paneling and the ceiling separate boards? I feel that the wood suits the architecture of the house and if you are going to be selling soon, it will set your house apart from others. It sounds like it is part of the reason you liked the house! However, if you are going to be there awhile and it feels too dark, and the walls are not as nice as the ceiling, them maybe just paint the walls and leave the ceiling.

The wood floor was a mistake and would be much better if it was another material, like slate, stone, dark large tile, etc., but it sounds like replacing that is not in the budget, so staining it a dark color is probably your best bet. The thing that bothers me the most is that there are 4 different flooring materials. And please, no carpet! You said you were going to remove the stone floor by the kitchen. What about replacing that and the carpet and the tile in the kitchen all with one of the options above? If you did slate (for example), you could then stain the wood floor a color that is in the slate for a more cohesive look. Then you can have fun with colorful area rugs! IKEA has a good selection at reasonable prices.

Fireplaces: For the tall one, I wonder if it will "pop" more once you stain the floor dark. You may want to wait until you do the floor to see. You could then add a mantel in the same color as the floor. Make it a substantial mantel so it is in scale. For the short fireplace, I like the idea of extending it up to the ceiling. I just don't know how to do this inexpensively. You probably won't be able to match the existing stone. Hmmm.... you could have it "boxed in" with drywall and continue this box to the ceiling and then paint it a fun color that coordinates with whatever color you use in the kitchen. I was going to suggest flanking it with bookcases that you can make look built in with moulding, etc., but because the ceiling is sloped, I can't figure out a way to make that look good.

Kitchen: I agree with others about updating and painting. You could also do a cool backsplash. That would hide a bit of wood! Hope this helps!
April 24, 2013 at 10:32PM     
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Joshua Cameron
I would say leave ceiling and beams those are awesome! Drywall everything else and paint a soft grey tone. Definitely go with a dark espresso for the floor and leave the cabinets and do a darker grey tile back splash. Remove the stone on the fireplace its very dated and do a wood mantel painted to match cabinets which will look great against a light grey wall. Thats what I would do with this space :) Jealous of those ceilings!!!
April 24, 2013 at 10:56PM     
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LB Interiors
I think it all depends on what style you want and how you may want to decorate.
Rustic Modern Woman Lake
April 24, 2013 at 11:16PM     
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zennifer
Dry walling would be much easier to reverse than painting. Even throwing cheap panelling over the good stuff might be a good idea if you want to try paint and want the grooves.
April 25, 2013 at 11:05AM     
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hazeldazel
what a fabulous mid-century space you have! Then someone put in tacky 80's flooring and kitchen in. Pooh. (the color of the floor doesn't match making everything look "off".) Cork flooring and a sleek modern kitchen from IKEA would be tremendous. Put in some Danish modern furniture maybe and some George Nelson lamps and a Elgin clock and BAM! and you have an out of this world mid-century atomic ranch. Here's some inspiration pics:

Brentwood - Sullivan Canyon 1
La Jennifer
12th Street apartment
Brentwood - Sullivan Canyon 2
Klopf Architecture - Kitchen viewed from family area
April 25, 2013 at 12:37PM     
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msnedd
I would keep the ceiling the way it is and
April 25, 2013 at 9:39PM   
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msnedd
I would keep the ceiling the way it is and sand, prime and paint the side walls. Replace the tile floors in the kitchen and decorate around everything else.
April 25, 2013 at 9:43PM   
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Stamps Design Services
I recommend keeping the ceilings and either removing the paneling and replace with drywall or prime and paint over the paneling...
April 25, 2013 at 9:45PM   
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cottageacres
So far, the ideas that have got us most interested are:
Restaining the floor to match the timber, and following this through to the kitchen;
Drywalling/painting the walls with the fireplaces and alternate walls (so that no timber wall touches another)
Continue the shorter fireplace to the top of the ceiling.
See how it looks in stages-the fireplace walls may do enough to lighten the rest.
I accept that stripping the paint off timber isn't going to work easily so it will be permanent!

We are going to wrap wall with art paper as a cheap way of testing the effect.

Im not normally drawn to cherry timber- I prefer paler timber for floors normally. (I do appreciate the warmth and quality of these particular walls though). I like the color of the floor more than the walls so to restain to the wall color is a little against my instinct but I do agree that one has to change, and the floor seems easier...

My instinct says to include soft gray in there against the wood, but pale whites against the fireplace brick. So to drywall the fireplace wall I see a white shade being most complimentary...Can I paint non-brick-touching drywalled walls a gray in the same room?
April 26, 2013 at 5:59PM   
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mveasey
@ cottageaces: sorry to get back to you two days late...have a look under photos and put in Build LLC in the upper right search bar, it should be the third picture presented. Hope that helps, sorry, I'm on tablet and I simply take the pictures, not the link...
Nice to see so many people are eager to help. Glad you liked my photo suggestion, I think that would be the best of both worlds. I really like the idea of extending the stone on the fireplace, that will make it really stand out and give all the "left over wood" something to work with, if you know what I mean... Best of luck!
April 26, 2013 at 10:29PM     
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mugsy1703
Too many of the picture suggestions are trying to turn your home into a country house, which it is not. Painting all the wood would be an absolute shame and would not be true to the style of your house. That being said, there is a lot of it. I would just paint the ceiling white and stain the ceiling beams dark. Paint out the kitchen cupboards in a gray tone ... something that picks up the color in your fireplace. Too bad the floor to ceiling fireplace isn't fieldstone like your smaller fireplace ... suits the style more. I would also do something with the hardwood floor as it is completely the wrong color ... I would go with a darker wood floor which would pick up the darker wood beams. Slate floor in the kitchen would be great. Remove the white carpet as well and perhaps match it to the wood flooring.
April 28, 2013 at 4:36AM     
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kmcroes
In you kitchen take both of the angled walls and cover or replace with drywall. Although your walls and ceilings are beautiful there is too much. This will make the beautiful continued side walls look like feature walls instead of just more wood walls. You can even just paint the drywall white and have a very contemporary look. The break up of wood will keep the eye focused on the height and not the extensive wood.

In your living room same thing on the massive wall with angles. You can then use that wall to display artwork and it won't look too busy with a white or light background. The floors and walls look very fresh and new where your fireplace does not. If you are looking for the contemporary look then I believe you should consider paint or even refacing the fireplace. Slate would look nice but if you don't have the money then painting it either blue/grey,grey, or white tones would all compliment very nicely. Do not go with beige. You have enough brown :)

The image is the best one I could find to give you the idea of the concept. Your home we be a lot more warm but with a touch now of airy with the smooth texture adding in.
April 28, 2013 at 5:02AM     
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Joshua Cameron
Cottageacres: This home is quite contemporary so I would follow that theme throughout the whole house and I have a feeling to exterior is quite contemporary too. And yes for the tall fireplace I would paint it a a shade or two darker grey and maybe a semigloss or a little more sheen than your walls but the other smaller fireplace I would change the stone out for a white mantle maybe with an inset of horizontal bricks painted cream a few shades darker than the mantle or the same dark grey as larger fireplace. I wouldn't touch those ceilings though they are the showcase of this home...absolutely beautiful!! I also wouldn't try to match the floors to the ceiling or to the cabinets either stay natural or go with a darker deep color. All these change are relatively cheap considering the alternatives and even if you are planning on drywalling yourself, get some quotes because a lot of the time with drywall they can do it for only a little bit more than what it would cost you for materials...I hope this has been helpful and have fun with your project and I'm sure the transformation will be amazing!! :)
April 28, 2013 at 8:51AM     
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LB Interiors
I would leave the wood and use it as the focal point to the rooms. The rooms are bare. There are so many options available to make it come together by adding color, furnishings, fabrics, and accessories. Something made you buy this house. Changing the beautiful wood is costly and not necessary if it can fit your design tastes.
April 28, 2013 at 10:20AM     
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Groovywares.com
I love that particular paneling. You can offset the warm soft dark look with a dimensional cold hard metal sculpture. One from the 60's would add a groovy feel and not look machine made. Lots of vintage handmade metal sculptures can be found at groovywares.com
July 11, 2013 at 2:36PM   
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proudnavymom67
We had my sister in law mud and texture over ours. It covered every wall in the den. No one could even tell that there was wood underneath. When the cable technician was trying to poke a hole through the "drywall" he couldn't figure out why his tool wouldn't go through. When I realized what he was doing, I then told him that it was wood paneling. He was very surprised and said he wouldn't have been able to tell the difference.
February 11, 2014 at 7:51PM   
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Marie-Josée
@proudnavymom67 : aren't you afraid that it will crack eventually ? I have a 50's house with plaster & it doesn't look very good when it starts to crack... It's a lot of repairs. We installed drywall in certain rooms because it was too awful...
February 12, 2014 at 7:42AM   
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kimberlyheart
I do think that your paneling is beautiful but a bit overwhelming. I was thinking that you could install horizontal moulding just above the door frames extending all the way around the rooms. Then, paint the lower half a nice taupey grey or blue gray. This would lighten up the room, showcase the ceiling and architecture, and create a cozier feeling. When you go to paint the cabinets, paint the island a similar color to the ceiling to tie it together. The wood floors could be stained darker then and you could replace the carpet with a nice dark Berber.
February 12, 2014 at 8:33AM   
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updating paneling around fireplace. Need ideas
We are installing new darker carpet soon and would...
Updating wood paneling
How to in expensively update wood paneling.
Need to know how to paint/update my wood-paneled sub-zero frig
I have an out-dated wood paneled sub-zero frig. that...
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need ideas of how to distress yellow pine floors with a heavy roller
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Need help deciding on color of new refridgerator
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