1903 Florida Cracker House
Meri Jo Grunsted
May 2, 2013 in Design Dilemma
I'm having a hard time finding information on this style and period specific color schemes. All the window trim is rotted and needs replaced, the shingles are asbestos and can't be removed, and I need a new door. We really want to remodel this home back to its original nostalgic roots, or as close as possible. But I have no idea what the trends were in 1903! Does anyone have any websites, books, or architectural digests that can help me? Painting will be the major fix to the exterior, but we are batting zero to find information.
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PRO
ASVInteriors
I love this project!
Here is a starting website for you http://www.oldhouseweb.com/architecture-and-design/cracker-farmhouses-1840-1920.shtml
You might also meet up with other owners and get their input...
May 2, 2013 at 9:20am     
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LA+A studio, llc
From ASVInteriors's link, it looks like there was an open porch originally that was enclosed at some point.
May 2, 2013 at 9:27am     
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Meri Jo Grunsted
Yes the front porch was originally a screen porch that is now enclosed, but due to money restraints we are not planning to change the enclosed porch. We're having to gut the interior of the home in order to renovate so I simply don't have the funds now to do any major overhaul on the front porch.
May 2, 2013 at 10:17am     
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Meri Jo Grunsted
Thanks to all, this gives me some direction to start looking!
May 2, 2013 at 10:24am     
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PRO
Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
@ASV, Great link!! This is a fun one! Great simple cottage bones. Trick will be deciding when to stop? Or better yet how far to go!
May 2, 2013 at 10:30am     
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pattiegoode
Those asbestos shingles can be removed, but great care has to be taken. There are special companies that can do it. I don't hate them and consider them just part of the history of this house! Are those jalousie windows? I bet when the "remodel" was done that gable was added along with the windows. How envious I am that you have found such a gem! Cannot wait to follow your progress...;)
May 2, 2013 at 11:39am     
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Ironwood Builders
The asbestos in transite shingles is fairly stable and does not become airborne easily. There are guidelines published (look here for a basic description:http://asbestoslitigationservices.com/asbestos-shingles/). As contractors we are not allowed to touch them without a special license and therefore need to subcontract the abatement. Rules for homeowners are different and it is possible to DIY at a much lower price. Best of luck with your project!
May 2, 2013 at 12:35pm     
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pattiegoode
My x-FIL removed his own while wearing a dust mask. I was furious with him at the time. That was about 20 years ago & he's still going strong. Just sayin'.
May 2, 2013 at 3:38pm     
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wyndyacre
If you attempt to remove the shingles yourself please wear a better filtered mask than an ordinary dust mask. Cancer from asbestos is very real and mesothelioma manifests itself about 20-25 years after exposure. The city I live near has a high rate of deaths from asbestos related cancers because of the industry practices here 25-30 years ago. My stepfather, my uncle and my brothers good friend have all died of methothelioma within the last 10 years in addition to many others in the city of Sarnia, Ontario.
May 2, 2013 at 4:22pm     
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wyndyacre
Are you near Appalachicola? Driving around that town and looking at all the beautiful historic cracker houses would give you lots of inspiration! Really enjoyed visiting there a few years ago.
May 2, 2013 at 4:34pm     
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TileWorks
All you need is a hammock and a margarita and you're done.
May 2, 2013 at 7:22pm     
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zennifer
W removed asbestos shingles from our brick house...we fully researched, and did it in throw away coveralls with the good gas masks, completely soaked every shingle with soapy water continually, snipped the nail heads and pulled the shingles through to prevent breakage, and then triple bagged the refuse and disposed of in accordance with our state's laws. (Landfill). I'd do it again, but not with less protection!
May 2, 2013 at 9:21pm     
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Meri Jo Grunsted
I did find one small treasure inside this house already...while tearing out a built in shelf, in what was probably the original kitchen I found a 1903 dime, a 1916 Buffalo nickel, and a 1920 wheat penny...I was so excited, you'd of thought I hit the lottery!!! I plan on displaying them in a shadow box somewhere in the house.
May 3, 2013 at 2:12pm     
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pattiegoode
So cool, MJG!!! And TileWorks, Make mine a beer, please. ;)
May 3, 2013 at 3:05pm     
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joannpb
What fun! Makes me wish I had a house to gut.
May 3, 2013 at 4:44pm     
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Meri Jo Grunsted
Wyndyacre,
I'm in southwest Florida.
May 4, 2013 at 12:24am   
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Meri Jo Grunsted
Problem #2, The front door seen in this picture leads into the enclosed front porch. Then there is another solid door that leads into the interior of the house, directly into the living room. I need help coming up with an idea for a better transition from the front door through the enclosed porch, through the next-door into the living room. It seems very odd to have two entrance doors. I would appreciate any suggestions and ideas that anyone has to offer. Thanks!
May 4, 2013 at 4:50pm   
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zennifer
Will the enclosed porch be a living area, or more of an enclosed porch? If it will be a porch, I'd trade the solid exterior door for more of a screen/storm door look. If it will be actual living space, like a living room, etc, I'd trade the original front door for an interior door that matches, maybe even a French door style.
May 5, 2013 at 6:25pm     
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ginale
These kind of projects fascinate me. I hope you post pictures throughout the Reno!
May 5, 2013 at 6:32pm     
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PRO
LA+A studio, llc
I would think of the enclosed front porch as a three-season room and then decide on what your budget will allow. At the very least I would change the solid door to something with more glass, but something else to consider is to open up the area inclusive of the flanking windows, to have a more continuous look of tall glass between posts, gradually returning the room to a porch feel. This image is similar to what I have described.
May 6, 2013 at 6:19am     
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Meri Jo Grunsted
Thanks to all for your feedback, it's been very helpful!
May 6, 2013 at 11:06am   
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studio10001
Hope your project is coming along well; any updates you might share w us?
October 27, 2013 at 5:58pm   
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