Is this chandelier too high and what fixture over table?
8dognight
June 10, 2013 in Design Dilemma
I took down the ceiling fan and moved the chandelier that was over the table to the living area in the room. In both photos, you can see that the chandelier looks high; however, when we tried it lower, it interfered with being able to see the pictures on the far wall from the kitchen. Also a 6' 3" friend of mine felt that while he wasn't hitting his head with the bottom of the chandelier at 78" from the floor, it was oppressively low at that height. It's now at around 90" from the floor. Should it come down four inches?

The other photo shows the table where the chandelier was. What kind of fixture will look good there? I'd like to find something like an electrified Aladdin but am open to suggestions.

Thanks.
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Genevieve
That is because you are using the wrong lighting for your space ,it looks like a slopped ceiling from what I can see ,therefore I would choose something closer to the ceiling but adjustable and hang the chandelier above your dining table instead.


June 10, 2013 at 11:31AM     
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msmliss
What a mess!!!! I sincerely mean no disrespect! I could not spend 30 minutes in this space! I would empty the entire space and start over with the bones, but only after first deciding what style you want! For example, you have two small rooms combined with very high ceilings, a very large fireplace, and many large pieces of fine art (the largest is on the wrong wall!), do you want to keep those chair rails? I'd get rid of them. Next, decide on what tables stay for style--not function--and finally decide on those large sofas. Do you love the color? Again style not function. Build your color palette after everything gets placed on the "Stay" or "Go" list with what style you wish to achieve on the heading of your check list. I hope this helps. Again, I mean no disrespect. Go to some showrooms, check out books from the library, find old issues of Architectural Digest, saturate yourself in interior visions of style until you begin to feel what balance means.
June 10, 2013 at 11:59AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Msmliss, that's okay. Drives me nuts, too. Which wall would you suggest? The largest painting used to be on the wall to the right of the fireplace.

And thanks, Genevieve, I'll look for a similar fixture and see what I find.
June 10, 2013 at 12:05PM   
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Warren Mullins
I must say that there's something to do with the chandelier that you chose. I see with this kind of ceilings, they use this
June 10, 2013 at 12:10PM     
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judianna20
Consider:

a larger chandelier

painting your walls and the ceilings all one color in both rooms (to diminish the effect of the angles)

Face the sofa toward the fireplace and try the other where the t v is now.

installing the t v over the fireplace

painting on the right wall (very blue sky) over that sofa


hanging the large oil (is that Hudson River School?), in the dining room, eye height on that solid wall.

For now, don't rehang the other pictures until you figure out the light, if you would like the t v over the fireplace and the oil in the dining room. No sense putting more holes in the wall.

Living Design 2

The wall paint in pix #2 is Devine/Ginseng
2011 Street of Dreams ("con Amore")
June 10, 2013 at 12:12PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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msmliss
that dining room wall was my thought, too, Judy, but 8dognight didn't provide that view. 8dognight, any wall where the frame's corner isn't inches from the ceiling unless you have so much fine art that you stack them as seen in the galleried halls of European castles! General Rule of thumb: the focal point of the picture should be at eye level of an average height person (not your friend!) when standing. Balance, it's all about balance.
June 10, 2013 at 12:18PM     
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msmliss
P.S. The focal point is not the subject, but the aesthetic horizon line (not a literal horizon), which is approximately the line 2/3's of the way up from the bottom of the canvas (or the line 1/3 down from the top).
June 10, 2013 at 12:23PM     
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8dognight
I will be hiding the TV in a piece of furniture so that it is not a focal point and I will be gallery hanging several paintings, some of which I took down temporarily.

What view is it that I did not provide? I included one of the large area behind the table, and I am considering that spot. Moving the large painting is no easy task so I haven't tried it yet.
June 10, 2013 at 12:36PM     
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8dognight
Regarding lighting: Does anyone know if it possible to have a fixture made like the one Genevieve posted with a couple of changes: 1) using older, more substantial metal tubing than is generally found in modern fixtures;and 2) that goes up and down so a tall ladder is not required to change the bulbs? Do any lighting companies make such things? Is it even possible?
June 10, 2013 at 1:21PM     
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June 10, 2013 at 1:49PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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PRO
Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
I think your room is charming. The large paining over the mantel is just fine and really acts as a focal point taking your eye away from all the angles in the room. The chandelier which is what your question is about I also think is fine and can be hung as low as passage under it is comfortable. You certainly do not want it too close to the ceiiling. Its style is just fine as well and looks like old money. If you read books by the more established designers like Charlotte Moss you will see that your chandelier is perfect for a living room space. It is OK to update a room but there is nothing wrong with traditional which is why it is traditional. You have great taste and need to go with your gut. Your room does not need to look like every other transitional room we see here so often.
June 10, 2013 at 1:53PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Thanks, Ipmenache. The chandelier is staying in the room; the question is where and how high. What I like about the idea of Genevieve's suggested fixture is the ability to direct the light. Antique shades for a fixture like that are fairly easy to find; however, modern fixtures that look as substantial as the chandelier in terms of materials and construction are not. I've been struggling with how to light the room.

Also struggling with what color or color/technique for the walls. In the photos I posted are numerous examples. The painted panels in greys are three different techniques: one is a very subtle faux with glaze; one is painted to suggest weathered wood, and a third, grasscloth. Any of those can be done with different colors. The solid panels taped to the walls are ochres (I think ochres, anyway toned down yellows) from FPEs Guggenheim colors and chosen as possibilities from the palettes in various paintings. I still haven't made up mind about color. I have yet to find the right rug or rugs for the room.

Every decision seems to hinge on deciding something else first which makes me feel bogged down.

The primary consideration in terms of design is that I live in the country, raise livestock, and also have a lot of dogs who are extremely well behaved but are allowed on the furniture.
June 10, 2013 at 2:25PM   
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LB Interiors
6'6" from the floor will most likely clear most of your friends' and family's heads In your room. I feel it doesn't have to be a normal low, so it looks okay to me. I would have to be in the room to feel it.

It can go higher about 6-8", just for spacial reasons when walking through the room. People will not feel like they have to duck by intruding on their space.
June 10, 2013 at 2:35PM   
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8dognight
LB Interiors, thank-you, I did try the chandelier at 6' 8" and it looked too low for the two reasons I mentioned. My query was on a good compromise height.

Msmliss, you're right the room is a disaster. Reading AD never does me a lick of good. When was the last time it featured a tiny 1990s house with a great room and vaulted ceiling? If there is such a feature, direct me to it, please. Also I can't imagine researching for style alone. I'm willing to try. Where to start? Houzz on traditional style with small house has not helped me.
June 10, 2013 at 5:20PM     
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LB Interiors
I missed that trial I guess, I'm sorry, I think I'd raise it 8"-10" - 12" because of the very high ceilings. I feel the proportion would still balance and not be too high. If people start ducking then, it's still too low.
June 10, 2013 at 5:36PM   
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lionnessone
I wish you had other photos from other angles of your home that you can post. Where is your kitchen, staircase, entrance (foyer) located? Please post photos.

You have a great room, but the wrong layout. Pull out everything in the room and look at it naked. Now visualize how you see this space. Start by replacing your rug on an angle facing the fireplace about 12 inches from the earth. I think you can place the couches on either side of the rug, looks like you have plenty of room. Place a coffee table centered with the couches. Now start placing your other pieces in the room. Alternatively, arrange the two couches as if they were sectionals. Place one couch on the left wall and leave the other one where it is but move it closer to the other couch and place an end table on the corner of the couches. Looks like you have a small TV set sitting on an end table remove the TV from the table and place it on the bookshelf in that corner of the room, this way you will be able to enjoy TV viewing from either couch. Do you have a chair for this room? If so, place it facing the fireplace on the other wall. Keep in mind your artwork is off the wall, now think where you can place the largest art piece. I would arrange the artwork on the dining room wall, but first arrange them on the floor and think on how you would love to have them placed on the wall. Think art museum! You have a very large wall space there for those pieces. My other suggestion would be to switch the two rooms. [houzz=Houndstooth Residence][houzz=Showhome 2010 - 2][houzz=thriftydecorchick][houzz=Modern Family Living Space in Grey][houzz=The Fiesta II in Hillcrest in Airdrie, AB][houzz=Living Room Remodel]
June 10, 2013 at 6:38PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
The color I like of your samples is the yellowish color that is to the right of the painting on the far left of your first photo. I have found that the yellow backgrounds make for a very pretty backdrop for art work. Because the dining room is open to the LR, I would paint them both the same color. Also paint the trim the same color throughout. In order to give the rooms some individuality I would use a different color for the accents in the DR. I do think that the 6'8" height of the chandelier is perfect as you want it to be part of the room not something in outerspace. Other lighting in the room can be added by picture lights over the paintings. These can be hardwired, with a cord or battery run. This will give you a a second level of light. The third level will come with table and floor lamps which will placed according to your furniture layout and use of the room. Is it in the budget or is it possible to put rescessed lights in the ceiling? It looks like you have a couple of eyeballs up there already so maybe you just add more.
Your TV cabinet/armoire can pose a problem. May I suggest just hanging the TV on the wall along with the art? If this is just not a option for you then hang it on the wall, build a frame around it and the then hinge a picture to it that can be openned when you want to watch TV.
In regards to a light in the DR, I would chose anything that you like. Your furniture there seems rather casual and so a very fancy light fixture may not be the ticket. While open to the other room it does not need to match but does need to harmonize with the space over all.
Again you have so many nice things to work with and a nice space. Make one choice at a time stick with it and then make the next. Dont second guess yourself.
I suspect you are in the British Commonwealth but I am not sure where.
June 11, 2013 at 4:24AM     
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
Just saw a previous post where 6 8 did not work. Ok then raise it till you feel comfortable but remember that the art is intended to be seen from the room where it hangs( in most cases) and just suggestions of it from other rooms. It will give a more layered look.
June 11, 2013 at 4:27AM      Thanked by 8dognight
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Mark
One of the best ways to light a room as lpmenache has suggested is recessed lighting. It is worth the investment. While other sources of lighting are important like lamps and wall sconces and natural light,
recessed lighting around the room can help push walls out and that can make your room feel larger, you can also aim recessed lights at photographs and art or anything that you want to draw attention to. Furniture fabrics and wood grain in furniture come alive with the proper lighting and for me it is worth the investment to install recessed lights.
June 11, 2013 at 5:05AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Here are shots of the whole room from various angles. Most of the photos were taken before I started moving things around. There is no staircase. The kitchen, dining and living areas form one inharmonious whole.
June 11, 2013 at 6:51AM   
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8dognight
TV: I was excited about the idea of putting the TV behind a painting until I got to thinking about putting wiring for it inside the wall and about swinging an oil painting (I had in mind the moose to the left of the fireplace) out of the way on a daily basis. A piece of furniture replacing the glass-fronted bookcase and the current TV table seems like the best idea.

Lighting: There are currently four recessed lights in the ceiling all on the living area side of the room. I could add more. If the chandelier stays where it is, I will definitely need more lighting.
June 11, 2013 at 7:08AM   
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msmliss
Great! The smaller painting above the fireplace is much better. Is it hanging on the same nail as the previous one, and explains why it is hanging still too high on the wall? Thanks for the new batch of photos! it's always so surprising to see how different rooms look when one gets there! The kitchen interrupts that living/dining room space! Who knew! Does that white door in the dining room go to a garage? If so, I'd suggest, once you choose your wall color, painting the door and frame the same color, to have it recede. Have you considered removing that chair rail in the living room? Additional lighting: once you decide what tables/cabinets stay & go (think functionality), I'd bring in some good-sized table lamps. When you look at your own photo of the wall where you have placed the largest painting, do you begin to sense how out of balance is the "weight" of the painting compared to the "light and airy" jumble of things beneath it, and how peculiar the effect of that low chair rail appears on your high vaulted wall?
June 11, 2013 at 11:30AM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
The large painting on the wall next to the Fireplace dwarfs all of the rest of the room. I would put it back over the mantle in my opinion.
June 11, 2013 at 11:40AM   
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LB Interiors
Could you catch us up, by posting pics of your current arrangement? I'm getting confused at what stage you're at now? Thanks
June 11, 2013 at 1:10PM   
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8dognight
I did not mean to be confusing. All four of the second set of photos were taken before I started shifting furniture and paintings. I posted those now just to show what the entire room looks like in general because Lionnesse wanted to see the room as a whole. I'll post some of the entire room as looks now this evening. I didn't realize the effect of using pics from a month ago would be disorienting; I should have.

All four of the photos at the top of the thread were taken after I began making changes. They are the most recent. Among those changes, I took the ornate exterior frame off of the large painting, then moved it over the fireplace. The frame came off like a champ in one piece. Ipmenache, the large painting is no longer as overwhelming as it was because only the interior frame remains.

Msmliss, you aren't the only one who likes the painting of the Yellowstone River over the mantle. My friends do as well and have suggested that the large pastoral scene hang on the wall behind the cypress table. When I try the Yellowstone River painting over the mantle again, I'll hang it lower.

Jumble: I wish to get rid of the jumble effect.

Chair rail is going when the room gets repainted.
June 11, 2013 at 2:39PM   
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msmliss
"Where is the cypress table"...? If it's the dining room wall, I think I thumbs up'd it before I saw the door on that wall. Any thoughts to my suggestion for that doorway? I think it could stay on the wall where it currently hangs IF the furniture beneath it is large & wide enough to "anchor" it to the room. It might also be nice on the "back" wall facing the fireplace, again, with the proper scale piece of furniture is beneath it. When you lower Yellowstone River into place, I'd suggest removing all of that collection of tiny items in favor of one thin, tall decorative piece, a candlestick, perhaps, maybe two or three, but all together on one side! Good progress!
June 11, 2013 at 2:59PM      Thanked by 8dognight
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bjowen
I'd like you to try the big painting on the dining room wall, make a gallery wall of the rest next to the fireplace and leave the mantle bare for now, or maybe a round decorative mirror would work. oh, and lend me a few border collies, I love them!
June 12, 2013 at 3:49AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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mefor
Definitely add more recessed lighting that can be positioned to highlight paintings.
June 12, 2013 at 4:09AM   
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8dognight
Door behind cypress table: I dislike that door as much as a rational person can dislike a door; however, I need a door into the garage. Would a solid door look better and make it reasonable to hang the large pastoral painting on that wall?
June 12, 2013 at 5:19AM   
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mefor
Yes, solid door painted same color as wall helps to make it almost disappear
June 12, 2013 at 5:26AM   
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ubettpar
Your ceiling fixture looks fine to me. Your art collection is magnificent. The fact that your tv is NOT over your fireplace suggests to me that it is not the center of your life. You have other interests: art, animals, comfort. Someone suggested moving the tv over the bookcase. Good idea. I will bet you coud find another place in your home for that wonderful little French table. Another person mentioned lamps. A table lamp on the table to the left of the fireplace and a floor lamp by the sofa that is against the wall would be good. Maybe a black shade on the table lamp. Something black in a room always calms the space. Repositioning that wonderful collection of walking sticks to the other side of the door would help accentuate your beautiful living room table. Your alladin dining fixture idea sounds perfect. Just a thought, but your wall color does not harmonize with any of your furnishings. Something to complement your fireplace tile and your red leather could add the comfortable elegance to your room that your furnishings deserve. Allowing for color discrepancies in photographs, perhaps something near Sherwin Williams (SW 6234) Uncertain Gray. Love your home and your things and your dogs. It is a home that says, "I am an individual and an interesting one at that."
June 12, 2013 at 5:34AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Fireplace is changing completely. I will either find an old mantle that isn't too fancy or have a simple one made from cypress. I want to do something interesting with a tile surround.

The design and color of the surround are dependent on choosing a rug and settling on paint color and technique. Sisal rugs are a genuine nuisance with so many dogs and so many muddy boots. You can see the paint color contenders on the walls. The front runners are grays and ochres, the latter picking up colors in the various paintings.

Oops. I didn't crop the ochre samples very well.
June 12, 2013 at 5:59AM   
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mefor
If you're looking for a vote, I prefer the warmer ochre color with your paintings and for the space in general
June 12, 2013 at 6:01AM     
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Glenn Baker
The gable wall with the corner fireplace makes me cross-eyed. Consider adding trim across wall at wall height (8 ft?) and painting the wall ceiling white above the trim. Maybe same for dining wall. Also please add light fabric shades to the chandieler, reducing glare.
June 12, 2013 at 6:04AM   
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8dognight
Here are 4 images of the room as of an hour ago.
June 12, 2013 at 6:04AM   
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mefor
I think that painting it all one color would help to take away that "broken up" look
June 12, 2013 at 6:09AM     
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msmliss
I would caution against an 8ft trim across the wall. You have an unusual asymmetrical slope on the fireplace side of your living room vault and a symmetrical vault in your dining room!
June 12, 2013 at 6:16AM     
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quatorze
In my opinion, your chandelier is a wee bit too small for the space. I once worked at an antique lighting dealer. Here is our cheat sheet on how to choose the right size and hang height for a chandelier, both over a table and to walk under. The sheet is a guideline; different chandeliers can hang higher or lower depending on mass, volume, etc. Hope this helps.
June 12, 2013 at 6:17AM     
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msmliss
I'm going to hazard an answer, quatorze, just from hanging out here with 8dognight; she loves her chandelier, and she may be hanging her largest painting on her dining room wall, once she paints (hopefully) that garage door and trim the same color as she chooses for her walls.
June 12, 2013 at 6:29AM     
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minoomajlessi
HI, ITHINK IT WOULD BE BETTER TO TAKE CHANDELIER AND INSTEAD BEAUTIFUL FRENCH GOLDEN TYPE WALL LIGHTS BESIDE THE BIG PHOTO.AND ABOVE THE LATERAL PHOTOAND NICE COLOUR FULCLOTH OVEROVER FIRE PLACE. AND AHIGHT ABAJOUR IN CORNER. MINOO
June 12, 2013 at 7:25AM   
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emillmill
I feel like the height of the room is taking your eye away from the chandelier so it might help to lower it.
June 12, 2013 at 7:29AM     
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msmliss
I agree that the chandelier is far too high for dining height "rules," and I've even considered additional task lighting for her art in that dining room space, but 8dognight is early on her learning curve on interior design, besides which she loves her chandelier. Once she gets that wall finished, and has decided to show--or not--her large painting on it, she'll get to get the opportunity to "live" with her chandelier at it's current height...and I have a feeling she'll still be getting a lot of input here. ; )
June 12, 2013 at 8:00AM      Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
On moving the chandelier from over the table to the living room, my first thought was that the chandelier is not wide enough for the space and needs to go back over the table. Yes, Quatorze you nailed it. You are right. I keep hoping this is one of those rules of thumb I can break if I manage to get everything else right.

But before moving the chandelier back to the other side of the room, I'm going to try lowering the chain about six inches. Glenn Baker, shades are a good thought for other chandeliers but not for this one, might as well put a bonnet on a Border collie :)

Whether the chandelier stays on the living room side of the room is also function of what other fixtures I find. If I find a very reasonably priced larger fixture that doesn't clash then the chandelier goes back over the table and the nonclashing different fixture goes where the chandelier currently is. The ceiling height is 9' to where the sloped part of the vault starts. The vault is 14'.

In reality, the likeliest scenario is that I find an affordable antique electrified hanging lantern that will go over the table and the chandelier stays where it is, just lower. I also add more recessed lighting, floor lamp, and table lamp.

Could I put those strips of LEDs anywhere? I'm behind the times and just found out about them. I am intrigued by the possibilities, in fact, dazzled. I have a gleam in my eyes like a kid holding strings of lights and facing a blank Christmas tree. Not a good sign for restraint.

I like the ochre colors, too, and they definitely get the family and friend vote by a huge margin. They are a bit stronger and less pink than my little digital camera makes them appear. I have a hard time imagining doors in those colors. I do intend to change the garage door to a solid door.

I moved the barrel with the shepherds' crooks to the other side of the French doors and have attached a photo. I have a floor lamp I can try in the corner later today and will try the big painting on the far wall this afternoon, too.

This is great. Thanks. The room seems to going somewhere.
June 12, 2013 at 8:09AM     
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quatorze
I will add this, if you love your chandelier and want to keep it where it is, try lowering it - it's your home and you only have to please yourself. If the chandelier is too small and "airy" for your taste/the situation, it might just be the look of the long insubstantial chain. Try adding a sleeve of fabric over the chain, this might provide enough visual oomph. Many European homes use a ruched sleeve and even a hollow tassel on the chain right above the chandelier itself, bringing in color and adding visual weight. I have attached pix of one of my chandeliers as an example. I live in a height-challenged NYC apartment so the length is not there to view, but the concept is the same. In your case, I would keep the sleeve simple, and perhaps tie it at the bottom, near the chandelier and then gently pull the fabric at the top of the chain and tie or sew it in place, so it does not ruche, but looks streamlined with vertical pleats. You might consider using a color in the painting as the color of the fabric sleeve, so it "blends more with the painting when viewing the painting, while still making the chain more substantial. It might work, it might not, these things are only known when you try it out. Best of luck.
June 12, 2013 at 8:28AM     
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8dognight
Quatorze, the fabric sleeve is something I have never seen before or never noticed if I have seen one. I'll look into it. I like the idea of picking up a painting color and doing that might give me a shot at using some fabulous but simple looking fabric that would otherwise be impossible to incorporate given the amount of dirt the family and the dogs track in from the farm.

I love what you did with the shades and ruche just below the collar to tie them together.

What is a "hollow tassel" on a chain above a chandelier? A brass tube with a tassel? Do you have a picture?

I like tassels but associate them with the kind of sumptuous curtains that would make this room more ridiculous. I've avoided window treatments for several reasons. I don't need them for privacy and they would add to the visual clutter.

Someone suggested an "abajour." I have no idea what that is and googling did not provide an answer.
June 12, 2013 at 8:44AM   
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mefor
When I googled abajour, images of lamps came up, but nothing gave me a definition of what it is. Thought maybe Spanish or Portuguese, but nothing came up there either. Maybe the poster will come back and define the term?
June 12, 2013 at 8:55AM   
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quatorze
The word is French, abat-jour, which literally translates to "lampshade" See here for slightly alternate use: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/abat-jour and here: http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/abat-jour

Here is a link to a vid of a solid silver chandelier at Hampton Court in England, which shows a chandelier of huge proportions with a fringe collar: http://tripwow.tripadvisor.com/slideshow-photo/the-royal-antique-chandelier-of-royal-palaces-of-hampton-court-made-of-fine-silver-london-united-kingdom.html?sid=79934604&fid=fb-5473149152543168002

You could approximate the tassel, which in real life is a hollow wooden spool around which fringe has been upholstered, with a length of fringe wrapped around the bottom of the chain, the fringe hanging just above the chandelier. A tassel might look a bit out of place, down on the farm, but not if it makes you happy. I would stick to the same color as the fabric sleeve or a change for contrast Perhaps a sleeve to match the walls and a tassel of green or blue. You could also forgo the tassel and make the sleeve roomier, then tie it twice close together at the base and at the top, then fan the fabric between the two tied sections, both at bottom and at top, into circular disks of fabric to act as a "solid fringe" with the fabric on the chain in between stretched taut to make vertical pleats, Check out the book, which is admittedly way over the top, " Sheer Opulence" by Nicky Haslam. http://product.half.ebay.com/Sheer-Opulence-by-Nicky-Haslam-2010-Paperback/78665925&cpid=1399258277 Even if a book is about outre elegance, one can always pick up a useful idea or two for home use. The chandelier, which seems Dutch brass in influence and they often had fringe bits to hide the join between chain and fixture.
June 12, 2013 at 10:26AM     
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mefor
Merci!!
June 12, 2013 at 10:28AM   
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Bettie Waddle
My mother's rule on hanging paintings - usually lower (maximum of 6" above the furniture) and closer together than you think. Also, align either the tops or bottoms (pick one) of the paintings, or groups of paintings and accessories, with each other all the way around the room. I see 4 different horizontal lines in the living room.
June 12, 2013 at 10:56AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
I think I found it although I couldn't get the slide show to play. Here is a tassel on a chandelier sleeve if anyone else is curious.
June 12, 2013 at 11:36AM     
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8dognight
Gave the far wall an audition for the large picture. Also tried it somewhat lower than shown but I apparently neglected to get a photo of that. The third shot is of the mantel and surround with nothing except painting and branding iron.

Chandelier diameter: which room length and width sum do I choose? The sum to the closet wall behind one of the couches or the sum across the entry to the front door? Remember this all one room. The dimensions work out to either a tad over 40" or around 48". 48" can't be right. That's huge. I better go measure again.

I think I better forget about tassels on chandeliers. In this room, a tassel on a chandelier would be what an old friend's mother used to call the crocheted handlebars.
June 12, 2013 at 12:45PM     
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mefor
I like it, great helpers you have there. I think with the odd proportions of the room you have to do the old fashioned "eyeball" it method for the chandelier. Could you imagine a four foot fixture hanging there in front of fireplace! Lol :)
June 12, 2013 at 12:51PM     
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mefor
Maybe for Versailles
June 12, 2013 at 12:52PM     
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shadon
HA HA love all the paint swatches on wall I did that once and my daughter came home from school and thought some crazy women moved in LOL You have a great house I suggest looking at lots of houses and rooms on houzz to find your style and likes and go with what you love to look at pics coming back at ! Please post the finished project!!!
June 12, 2013 at 1:22PM     
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LB Interiors
Thanks for the updated photos. I see paintings that are very similar in content. The painting at the right of the fireplace might be a better scale for the fireplace wall. The far right painting above the red sofa can be lowered to about 8" above the sofa back. I'm sorry, but I feel that the large painting above the fireplace would have been nicer if it weren't so close to the left corner of the ceiling. I like it on the dining wall. Nothing on the Tv wall at the moment. I feel that three paintings in the same area are a bit much, something else there, not sure what yet
June 12, 2013 at 3:44PM   
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LB Interiors
I would paint a lghter color for the walls and a deeper color for the ceilings. I feel the ceilings need to visually connect and come into the space farther. What colors do you like?
June 12, 2013 at 3:49PM     
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quatorze
That dimension for the width of the chandelier is the max width. The "rules" are just guidelines, written so designers and customers could rule out fixtures that were obviously too big or too small, especially in a showroom with chandeliers hanging six deep from the ceiling in a showroom the size of a football field... You would be surprised though how some chandeliers at 48" would work, while others of a smaller diameter would be too big, there are so many variables, which is why high-end antiques dealers let designers take them to try them out before the sale is final - always assuming the piece is in the same condition if it is returned... If you have two rooms blending into one, you should draw imaginary lines to square each "section" and then use the resulting "room" to take dimensions for the chandelier.

See this website for images of very expensive chandeliers and reproductions that are equally expensive: http://marvinalexanderinc.com/

I love your large painting, btw, but agree with others, it is too big to go over the mantel, it overwhelms the fireplace and seems cramped on that wall. The wall where the helpers are holding it, near the dining table, seems a better fit.

Now I am going to make a suggestion that will really make you crazy; ever consider painting the ceiling the same color as the walls or just a shade lighter? It would reduce the harsh contrast between the two areas of ceiling and wall and help disguise all the angles, especially if it were all one color, so the art would not look so closed in. Just a thought; don't shoot the messenger... If your helpers want to strangle me, tell them as a teen, I had to paint a very ornately carved plaster room in my mother's choice of color, "Firefly Green" The room was so ornate, with tons of ceiling and wall carvings, we had to do it all by brush - no rollers. The color literally glowed in the dark and when she came home, she said, :Oh no, paint over it all in off-white" I was ready to kill her when my father grabbed me by the neck and said "Yes dear" As she left the room, Dad turned to me and said, "Son, that's what it means to be married..."
June 12, 2013 at 4:36PM     
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LB Interiors
This gives you an idea of similar colors and maybe a visual to help. Darker ceilings than the walls. Paint a darker contrast color for the wainscotting. I think the chandelier should be larger. I think I'd like a bookcase unit for the TV. and move the rectangle painting above the fireplace. A colorful area rug would be nice. Use colors for accents and accessories.
Not to scale. Colors may be whatever you prefer.

Before and After
Before - Living Room After - Living Room paint, chandelier, TV and art
June 12, 2013 at 5:34PM     
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Vivian Rase
More than anything, what I see is that the scale is off on several items. The picture above the mantel is too large and honestly looks too large for anywhere in the room. The chandelier looks dwarfed in the space no matter how high or low you hung it. The tv is so small that I'm not sure how you view it (an armoire with a larger tv would be my choice....I always hide electronics). The other pictures are hung too high. The table the tv is on doesnt work in the room anywhere. The rendition above by LB interiors is a good start but looks "heavy" on the right and I'm not a fan of looking at the back of a sofa (play with the arrangement or add a sofa table)
I hope I didn't repeat what others wrote...I didn't read through comments since there were so many
June 13, 2013 at 4:53AM     
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8dognight
Yes, Vivian, the painting *is* too big for the room and the room *is* too small for the painting. Too bad. Those two will just have to settle their differences, stop bickering, and work out their disagreements concerning scale in a civilized manner. To painting:"You don't get to hang in a big house any more. Get over it. I did; you can as well, Mr. Too Big Pastoral Scene, or I'll take off your other frame." To house: "You don't get to be as frumpy as you used to. Take some trouble with your appearance. Spruce yourself up. Go to the gym."

Think scolding them will help? Always disappoints me when it doesn't.

I think the right rug will go a long way to mitigating problems of scale. Finding the right antique rug is a long process. I've tried three so far.

LB Interiors, I have two candidates for housing the TV. The first would fill the wall and is a good piece of furniture. I have the other two doors for it. I did not put the holes for wiring in it but I would have I am ashamed to say. The second candidate for the TV is an antique case for upright painting storage that is not a good piece of furniture. The top of the case is actually a lid; my contractor can install a TV inside that will lift out.
June 13, 2013 at 5:55AM     
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mefor
Go for the lift in the cabinet, hide that tv, your art is the star there :)
I've tried scolding too, doesn't always work, bad, wicked inanimate objects!!
June 13, 2013 at 6:18AM     
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apple_pie_order
@8dognight: how's the leather sofa reupholstery coming along? I remember you found a good company for dog-resistant leather.

I like hanging the big painting in the dining room.
June 13, 2013 at 6:24AM     
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8dognight
Leather: I was trying to wait until I found the right rug before committing to a leather color so I am caught up in the one decision depends on another mire. I ruefully concluded yesterday that the latest rug is wrong so I'm thinking that I might as well go ahead and order leather even if that limits rug choices later. I noticed that Quatorze pointed out in comments on reupholstery that it is not wise to wait until the end of summer or early fall so I'm going to go ahead and force myself to make a decision that may be less than perfect.

In the 1980s, I renovated an 1880 Second Empire cottage. The domino effect ruled. Start to fix plaster and find wiring issues. That kind of thing.

Waiting to settle on a wall color and a leather color for reupholstering couches until finding the perfect antique rug is the equal and opposite of the domino effect. It's a domino blockade. Sometimes I don't understand how anyone redecorates or redesigns at all. With an old house, the decisions are often cut and dried: fix the wiring first or risk family, pets, yourself, and the house. With changing furnishings and minor changes to an existing contemporary structure, the choices aren't so dire and hence, for me, harder to prioritize.
June 13, 2013 at 7:22AM     
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apple_pie_order
I agree with you. Have you thought about museum-style de-acquisitioning anything?
June 13, 2013 at 7:59AM     
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mefor
Does it have to be antique rug, or antique looking rug? With the dogs, you might be better off with a rug made with scotchguard factory applied. Home decorators has tons of rugs at pretty good prices. Something with your ochre colors would blend nicely with most leathers.
June 13, 2013 at 8:06AM   
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8dognight
Everything in the living room at this moment can go elsewhere except the large painting, the chandelier, and one of the couches. Those 3 stay in the living room and maybe the other couch, too. It's pointless to buy a different couch or couches.

In one sense I've made a lot of progress. I've decluttered substantially and had a box room added to the bunkhouse. Tomorrow the kitchen cabinet guy is coming out to measure, and I have three painting bids in hand if I can ever decide on a color and/or technique. I got rid of the ceiling fan light fixture in the living room.

I want to redesign the tile surround for the mantle using some of the tile designs below from Earthsong Tiles but in different colors and glazes from the ones in the sample.

Now that apple-pie has gotten me to think about this, color decisions are my main stumbling block. It's not just paint if I get someone in to do painted grasscloth, for example.

Is the way to start with a solid color? That way, if I like it, I can then move on to a technique if I want or try another color if I don't. Those room painting programs from SW and Benjamin Moore have not been helpful even using my own photos because the actual colors differ from what my computer displays. I like the ideas of painting the ceiling either darker than the rest of the room or using the same color for the ceiling as the rest of the room.

mforr, I do intend to use an antique oriental rug. They are the best at hiding dirt; I like them; and they wear like iron if properly cared for (meaning no brush on vacuum end and never the special thing made for wall to wall, whatever that's called). I have several pleasant but not spectacular old rugs but they are too small it turns out. I used to have them in a row in a much larger room. That doesn't work in this room, so I'm looking for a bigger rug.
June 13, 2013 at 8:44AM     
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apple_pie_order
The griffons are wonderful. Any other classical touches?

Even though it is a hassle to pick out Oriental rugs when you are far from their store(s), hauling a half dozen or so out at one time might break the decision logjam. It looks like you are already leaning toward a gold tan paint color. Finalizing that decision depends on the cabinet finish you choose. I'd choose the cabinet finish and the rug at more or less the same time, then the paint. If it's an all day expedition to the rug store, take a couple of sample cabinet doors or drawers with you and use those to narrow down the rug selection.
June 13, 2013 at 9:23AM     
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ubettpar
The last time I was at Home Depot buying paint I noticed they had a box of clear sheets, 8x10" that had a peel off adhesive strip on the backside of the sheet. They are designed to be able to paint the sheet with your paint color and stick it on the wall without the visual intrusion of blue or white tape.
June 13, 2013 at 9:35AM     
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ubettpar
I agree with apple pie. When choosing a paint color, having the rug down is key in making the decision. And you are so right about old rugs. They can take a beating and still look superb. Mine have been underfoot for 25 years and still look new.
June 13, 2013 at 9:40AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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LB Interiors
You can mix wood colors in a room successfully, they don't have to match each other.
June 13, 2013 at 10:27AM     
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LB Interiors
I like the antquity of the lift-top cabinet and sounds like a great idea to be able to conceal the tv when needed. You may want to try 'old english' oil and give it a rub down. It may work real well to revive it a bit.
June 13, 2013 at 10:28AM     
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LB Interiors
I would choose the paint colors first and on what surfaces they are going. The walls and ceiling are very large weighty surfaces. They entail the entire areas, very high ceilings and include adjacent rooms. In this case, due to the difficulty for a quick paint change and maybe added expense and time, I would move in the direction to find colors that you will be most comfortable with for the walls and ceilings.

I suggest soft and darker neutrals that will work for you over a long period of time. It would afford you the possibility of not having to repaint in the near future, due to new purchases of furniture or accessories. Choosing paint colors first, points you in a direction for everything else in the room. It becomes the foundation to build upon.

For me it would be a big expense to repaint if I didn't like the colors, knowing that there may be a possibility of new furniture. Whatever color new items will be, will always work with neutrals.
June 13, 2013 at 12:42PM     
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quatorze
I have been thinking; ever consider a very pale soft blue for the walls and ceiling? It would compliment the browns in wood furnishings, leather, if you go brown, and cabinetry, the tiles you are looking at for the fireplace as well as the white of the mantel. It would pull out the blue of the sky in your paintings, almost putting the room "in" the painting. It would read almost as "light". A sleeve of blue fabric on the chandelier chain would be pretty and compliment the gold color of the chandelier. I think it's a Ralph Lauren paint I have in mind, called "Palladian Blue" which is almost the color of the large rooms at the spa in Bath England. Blue is homey, elegant, ages well and goes with many things, given the right hue and saturation. Again, a very pale, almost icy blue or very pale aqua. Ceilings in this color are big in the South and your walls and ceiling in it might read as very airy and spacious. Don't be put off by the grandeur of the room in the attached picture, the color is the thing. The Ralph Lauren version is a touch paler with the fainest hint of aqua. I used it on a friend's ceiling in the bedroom and it almost reads as white until one looks closer.

Again, don't shoot the messenger... :)
June 13, 2013 at 1:57PM     
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quatorze
And an antique rug in mixes of creams, taupes, browns, greys, blues, shades of ivory, and even touches of black would go great with blue walls and ceilings....
June 13, 2013 at 1:59PM     
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LB Interiors
I love that room 'quatorze' I agree a blue or aqua or teal would be absolutely wonderful!!! '8dognight' ..I'm not feeling real comfortable about using those colors with the red sofas:)) If new sofas were on the horizon, absolutely yes! Love those colors!!
June 13, 2013 at 2:16PM     
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8dognight
Quatorze, delusions of grandeur are my favorite. LB Interiors, I'm considering something different for the sofas. New sofas are not on the horizon; new upholstery is.

I have decided to buy the latest rug, so the paint is likely to be something like Farrow & Ball Dutch Pink. I will, however, look at teals.
June 13, 2013 at 3:34PM     
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apple_pie_order
Gorgeous rug. @Quatorze: you have an excellent memory for colors.
June 13, 2013 at 4:03PM   
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8dognight
A local designer has suggested mohair velvet cushions for the sofas, with one long cushion for each. How fast does mohair velvet get all crinkly and old looking? I don't want to have to age it place. I want it crinkly and old looking now.
June 13, 2013 at 4:55PM     
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apple_pie_order
Apply dogs firmly to new mohair sofa. It'll look ratty in no time. Have you ever scraped dog hair off velvet? Buy a $5 sample of mohair velvet (it's $250-$350 a yard) and throw it on a dog bed somewhere. CHeck back the next day.

The leather is a great choice.
June 13, 2013 at 5:09PM     
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8dognight
Bless your heart for the info. I will purchase sample immediately. I should have known. I did know. I just love old, crinkly velvet so I deceived myself. Back to durable leather. Yea, verily, enough mohair velvet slipcovers to make that work on a clean every day basis would fill a room Quatorze might like. Good quality leather is sturdy, attractive, and (once a pup stops chewing) durable. Nick of time thanks.
June 13, 2013 at 5:19PM   
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LB Interiors
Soft teal and darker teal for paints. Beautiful!
June 13, 2013 at 6:53PM   
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LB Interiors
It may cost you more to reupholster vs buying a new sofa set.
June 13, 2013 at 6:55PM   
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LB Interiors
Pink is a very girly color. You may find a shade that might work.
June 13, 2013 at 6:58PM   
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LB Interiors
Why not go with a crinkle velvet?
June 13, 2013 at 6:59PM   
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LB Interiors
The rug is great and will also work with beige and tan or soft yellow.
June 13, 2013 at 7:01PM     
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8dognight
LB Interiors, I consider extra expense to reupholster good furniture to be well spent. If couches made today were of equal quality I would be torn. I am not. In addition, good upholsterers are as worthy of business as furniture stores are.
June 13, 2013 at 7:13PM     
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LB Interiors
I totally agree with quality construction and it is worth it.
June 13, 2013 at 7:16PM     
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quatorze
Love the rug. Take the teal color from the rug, and have the paint store match it, and then cut it by half or so with white, to get a paler tone of the same color for walls and ceiling. You can also use a pink, but a pink with a touch of brown in it. Only problem with pink is that it can go really girly and sugary or it can go fleshy, both can be a touch ill-making long-term. Whatever you choose, remember the art in the room and work with it.

Mohair velvet: It cannot be made into slipcovers, it's only used as re-upholstery or for pillows. It will not get crinkly per se, it's incredibly tough. Mohair velvet is frighteningly expensive, often going for $700.00/yard for the higher-end versions. Here's a link for a great fabric resource, which carries many mohair velvets, just so you get an idea of pricing at the discount level. If you use them, get a sample before you decide, computer monitors never show color or texture accurately. The link: http://www.iluvfabrix.com/products.php?cid=13&page=8

It does wear like iron though, that is why it was used on theater seats back in the day. Because it's wool, it resists stains. It is velvet, however, and will catch animal hair, so a lint brush will be a permanent household fixture. It ages beautifully. Take the pros and cons into consideration. The fabric cannot be easily piped (edged) either, so you have to buy leather piping or a sturdy pre-made fabric piping. Leather upholstery is better for ease of maintenance, but that too is more a re-upholstery job, I have never seen a leather slipcover, at least not outside of a dungeon or on a Gestapo agent... :)

Seriously, I think that's what LB meant, if you use leather of mohair, it may be cheaper to buy new rather than re-upholster, since slipcovers are not done in either covering. I have seen slipcover makers curse a blue-streak just from using a heavy linen for slipcovers; ask them to make covers out of mohair velvet and they will commit suicide, after taking your life...
June 13, 2013 at 7:48PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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quatorze
Just read further. If the sofas are well constructed then i agree with you and LB, whatever it costs to re-upholster is worth the expense, since replicating the same quality construction in a new sofa would cost even more. And now, for delusions of grandeur Manhattan-style, in a very small apartment...
June 13, 2013 at 8:01PM     
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onthecoast1
Here's just what I see that could be improved:
--Too many large rectangular pieces on the walls. You need a round mirror above the fireplace, one large piece next to it, then maybe a series of 6 small matching frames above the sofa. I do like the large piece of art on the wall behind the dining table.
--I hate all bright brass, so I would toss the chandelier and start over.
--I'm in agreement with others that all 4 walls should be one color.
--The ceiling should be painted a coordinating cream that goes with the walls.
--I think your wall color is too light. If you're keeping the red furniture, I would be looking at a yellowy-tan shade. Try Valspar's Fioli Antique Lace color.
--Kitchen cabinets should be painted mocha that will coordinate with the tan walls and the cream ceiling.
--TV is all wrong.....it at least needs a cabinet to rest on.
The "bones" of your room is gorgeous.....you have a fantastic canvas to decorate! :-)
June 13, 2013 at 9:30PM      Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
The rug won't be coming back here until the rug store reweaves a spot. If that rug were perfect I couldn't afford it.

1decoratingqueen1, thank-you for the kind words about my room, but quite frankly I don't think I would be in this fix if the house had any bones whatsoever.

To house: "Listen, you spineless dwelling, take a look at that fabulous apartment above. Chin up. Shoulders back. Stop slumping."
June 14, 2013 at 5:35AM     
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apple_pie_order
Whatever happened to the strategic mohair reserve? I thought it got phased out 20 years ago. If mohair velvet costs hundreds of dollars per yard, mohair growing is apparently not being subsidized by the feds any more. Perhaps the mohair subsidy has finally vanished into legend.
June 14, 2013 at 6:30AM     
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mefor
Please don't allow the government to grow goats. Thank you , I approve this message ;)))
June 14, 2013 at 6:35AM     
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quatorze
I think house may shrug off last admonition, size trumps fabulous every time. Just ask fabulous apartment about storing things. Every time one thing is moved, ten other things need to move to allow it to happen; it's like playing Chinese checkers...
June 14, 2013 at 6:36AM     
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quatorze
Strategic mohair reserves were depleted by politicians on both sides of the aisle for meretricious use of reserves in toupee making before last election cycle. Future generations will rue our profligacy...
June 14, 2013 at 6:41AM     
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quatorze
Last time government tried to grow a goat, it came out as a Mexican hairless cat...
June 14, 2013 at 6:44AM     
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mefor
Lol :) that's quick wit, quatorze, applause!!!!
June 14, 2013 at 6:48AM     
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8dognight
I know almost nothing about furniture. Is the highboy Chinese Chippendale? The other furnishings all look French various closely related periods. Are the andirons French as well? I've never seen anything like them.
June 14, 2013 at 7:11AM   
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quatorze
Good call. It is actually a Queen Anne highboy, with a gallery added at the top, which makes it look Chinese Chippendale. It is a hand-made reproduction using the exact same construction methods of the eighteenth century, in solid curly maple by a great company in Massachusetts, named Eldred Wheeler. Most of the best family antiques are still in the hands of Mother, aunts, etc., so I have some repros, though I have had this piece for about 25-30 years, making it old in and of itself... I designed the gallery and the firm was kind enough to make it. I don't think they do that kind of custom work any longer.
June 14, 2013 at 7:24AM     
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mefor
Love your fire quatorze, not easy to get such a lovely detail in the city ;)
June 14, 2013 at 7:28AM     
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quatorze
Fire is courtesy of Samsung and Con Edison. My youngest niece wanted to roast a marshmallow .... :)
June 14, 2013 at 8:09AM     
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mefor
At least con Ed is doing something useful for a change!! You have some lovely things in your apartment. Very welcoming and attractive images.
June 14, 2013 at 8:13AM   
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8dognight
I forgot to mention that ever since the ruched sleeve chandelier I've been hoping Quatorze would post more apartment photos. Lovely and whimsical.
June 14, 2013 at 8:39AM     
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msmliss
Finally able to come back and catch up. Add my 2 tuppence in 'thumbs up's"...Delighted with all of your humor, 8dognight!
June 14, 2013 at 5:38PM   
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quatorze
Glad y'all liked the little tour. Here are some more...
June 14, 2013 at 8:37PM     
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michmc
8dognight, if the gov't did grow goats, your dogs could get large goat herding contract, enabling extra cash to pay for antique rug!
June 15, 2013 at 4:22AM   
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8dognight
What a good idea. A few of my sheep and dogs got hired last summer for a horror movie shot nearby. It's a scary movie produced by Slash from Guns N Roses and will be released soon. We love gainful employment.

Quatorrze, is that a trompe l'oeil bookcase or a mirror in that splendid frame?

I hope your flatmates are stuff tolerant because I can't imagine getting rid of any of those things simply to make space.
June 15, 2013 at 5:07AM     
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quatorze
Mirror is reflecting the bookcase(s) that line the entry hall. Nothing can leave; the bookcases arrived after the furniture was in and now nothing can get out unless the bookcases are unloaded and removed. This apt.is tiny by any American standard, a one person living space in which every square inch has to do double duty. It does hold lots of people for a cocktail party. I have held a few dinner parties, but they are nightmares; the table under which the TV sits opens to seat twelve but the kitchen is so small, you have to leave it to change your mind. I managed but when all the guests left, i was left with hours of work to put it all back together. Cocktail parties are the way to go in this space...
June 15, 2013 at 5:57AM     
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mefor
I had a few 5th and 6th floor walk ups in Chelsea, I can surely commiserate. Though one of them was a 2 story duplex with a roof deck with the most wonderful view of the Empire State Building. At night you could practically reach out and touch it. Loved that place. Tiny but perfect, and had working fireplace!!! Take that con Ed!! :)
June 15, 2013 at 6:07AM   
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apple_pie_order
@quatorze: fabulous things in your apartment. Looks like a box of jewels.
June 15, 2013 at 6:49AM     
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quatorze
The result of years of collecting and some family treasure cut loose from Mom :)

One of my secretaries back in the day is now a professional artist and teacher in Santa Fe, the Sargeantesque oil painting of the old lady is by her, from her days studying at NYC's Art Student's League.

Yes, living in NYC exacts a price, but it is never boring... I am lucky enough to be able to see Union Square Park at an angle from my windows, so the flat is small, but the huge windows and view make it all OK. Amazing what a bit of light can do; I was with a friend yesterday and we got off on the wrong floor of her building accidentally. Her floor's hallway has windows and this floor did not, the difference just getting off the elevator was amazing - without those two small windows, it was like entering a tomb!
June 15, 2013 at 7:50AM     
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8dognight
Is that soft broccoli growing from the urn? I'm pretty sure it's not Brussels sprout or cabbage next to a faun who is either shocked at the notion of Brassica in the adjoining space or perhaps once graced a fountain.

Love the old lady painting. I was way too intimidated to ask about it. Landscape to her left is impressive as well. And is the black and white Avedon looking portrait next to the mirror a family member?
June 15, 2013 at 8:50AM   
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msmliss
So 8dog.....what news have you to share on the progress of your space?
June 15, 2013 at 10:19AM   
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8dognight
Tried floor lamp in the corner. I think I better get it rewired. I don't remember the last time I used it. That corner usually has a telephone table in it.

Also I have been looking at Dutch Pink which is more a warm taupe type color than a pink. My camera or else my computer turns everything pinker than it is.

I have to decide on new kitchen cabinet doors.
June 15, 2013 at 12:53PM   
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8dognight
I have a hard time getting into the whole kitchen cabinet mystique even though mine are lamentably visible so what they look like matters. The cabinet guy is going to want to know. Soon. I'm thinking very simple straight doors and a fabulous vent hood for the stove, something out of Jules Verne.
June 15, 2013 at 1:20PM   
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apple_pie_order
Jules Verne vent hood might be hammered copper or steam punk. Do you like steam punk?
Bruce Rosenbaum
Kitchen
Custom Copper Kitchen Hood
June 15, 2013 at 3:31PM     
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apple_pie_order
Simple doors could mean shaker style. Classic. A high quality wood with a low sheen finish would be attractive. If the dogs are allowed in the kitchen, a wood finish is easier to maintain by far than a painted finish.
June 15, 2013 at 3:34PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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quatorze
8dog: The green is a preserved moss ball; no maintenance... http://www.thegardengatesblog.com/2011/02/07/decorative-moss-balls/

Landscape is by a French artist friend of my grandmother's; have forgotten his name.

Black and white photo is of the actress, Claire Danes by the celebrity/fashion photographer, Firooz Zahedi. http://firoozzahedi.com/ It was at a society charity auction and I put in a low bid to get the ball rolling. Later that night, I found I had won the silent bid auction because the caterer had moved the wall that the photo was on and no one else saw it to bid! She is wearing a wreath of antique roses in her hair, posed as the goddess Flora. I like Neoclassicism...

The 'faun" is actually a plaster cast of a Bacchante. I think he is in shock that he is no longer sipping wine...
June 15, 2013 at 3:35PM     
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quatorze
If cabinets will be seen from all the space, maybe cabinets that blend with the wall or the tone of the wood furnishings would help?
June 15, 2013 at 3:44PM   
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8dognight
Disappearing cabinets, that's the idea.

Okay, on the wood finish. I was thinking that a light gray paint would turn the cabinets invisible.

If paint done in a cabinet shop is harder to maintain, then I'm thinking wood. Again.

So how about Biedermeier looking cabinets with very straight fronts?

Yes, on those hoods. Something gorgeous and functional. I know cabinets can be great and interesting. They bore me, and I know I have to think about them because the choice will matter a lot later and I will wish I had paid attention.

I had a wonderful time on luvfrabrix website indulging myself in delusions of grandeur, in particular some crewel work on velvet for a footstool and cushions.
June 15, 2013 at 3:48PM   
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LB Interiors
For kitchen cabinets I wouldn't go gray, it's trendy and the longevity of off white, cream, beige, all wood tones, mahogany and dark cherry are lasting. You can accent with gray and whatever colors you prefer. I think the style of the cabinets would be the priority for you.
June 15, 2013 at 4:51PM     
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quatorze
I tend to agree with LB on the cabinets, maybe a paler honey coloured wood tone (maple) to blend with the Dutch Pink paint you are considering. A plain front is nice, but in my opinion, a dead flat plain front is like a modern building, one ding and it looks worn. A front with some molding, or even a Shaker style with a plain recessed panel, will age better and be more classic for the long haul. You can always change up the hardware to update the look and add sparkle or color. I would start with wood, plywood cases and solid wood faces, you can paint the wood down the road using oil-based paint for smoothness and durability if you get bored with it.

Hoods: Metal is one way to go. If you do, think about a metal, like copper, that develops a patina with age, rather than stainless steel which just gets and looks dirty from grease and finger marks and drives people like my sister crazy about cleaning and polishing it. You might also consider a hood covered in cement backer board and then covered in tile, like a French or Italian home. Tiles can be dead plain or as fancy as your taste and budget permit, g;lazed tile, quarried stone, travertine.... Wood is also nice, especially if matched to the cabinets and with a bit of metal trim in the corners, like an old sea chest, so the metal protects the corners and edges from chipping.
June 15, 2013 at 8:17PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
I've never seen a tile covered hood. Could you show me one? The Balmoral kitchen perhaps? Highclere Castle?

And come to think of it, I've never seen a wooden vent hood either. Strapped like old trunk would suit me. I'll go take a look.
June 16, 2013 at 4:56AM   
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mefor
Here are some, from simple to fanciful. I believe the one that looks like copper is actually faux finish.
June 16, 2013 at 7:13AM     
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mefor
More
June 16, 2013 at 7:14AM     
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mefor
More
June 16, 2013 at 7:15AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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mefor
Last
June 16, 2013 at 7:15AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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mefor
Some tiled ones, not enamored with any of these
June 16, 2013 at 7:20AM     
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mefor
One more
June 16, 2013 at 7:21AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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mefor
This one is quite nice
June 16, 2013 at 7:21AM     
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LB Interiors
Not sure, maybe you'd like this idea.
June 16, 2013 at 9:06AM     
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quatorze
I think at Balmoral, the staff inhales the smoke and then blows it out the windows... I see others have provided the requested pix of hoods - in many permutations. A good kitchen and bath center should have plenty of ideas in the showroom as well.
June 16, 2013 at 11:59AM     
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quatorze
Just saw a simulcast of Helen Mirren in "The Audience", about Queen Elizabeth and her Prime Ministers. She meets Wilson at Balmoral and he complains about the extraordinarily primitive accommodations, cold, wet, rustic... It was very funny, a left wing Labour minister jibing the Queen on the hellish accommodations.

FYI, ILuvFabrics is having a sale as noted below with the sale code:

GET AN EXTRA 10% OFF EVERYTHING YOU BUY!

WE ARE ALSO GIVING YOU AN ADDITIONAL 10% OFF EVERYTHING YOU BUY FOR THE NEXT 2 DAYS..

PLACE THE COUPON CODE BELOW IN THE COUPON BOX (VISIBLE AT CHECKOUT), AND AN EXTRA 10% WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM YOUR PURCHASE. (but only for 2 days).

YOUR CODE IS:

VHT895

THE COUPON DISCOUNTING HAS ALREADY STARTED, SO BE SURE TO START YOUR SHOPPING NOW. Click to browse.
June 16, 2013 at 12:09PM     
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8dognight
Apple-Pie, I do like steampunk. I better avoid it in the house where I have to look at it on a daily basis, not so the for the bunkhouse. In fact, after I get the living room looking more settled and dignified, I want a steampunk cowgirl look for the bunkhouse with lots of grinning Donna Howell-Sickles cowgirls and steampunk lights like the one attached which is made from a gun powder silo cover.

Thank-you, Quatorze for the code. I'm ordering fabric now.
June 16, 2013 at 3:16PM     
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apple_pie_order
The Fortuny style hand blocked printed velvets were impressive.
June 16, 2013 at 3:38PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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quatorze
AOK
June 16, 2013 at 6:40PM     
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8dognight
Iluvfabrix is fascinating. I ordered a a green hand blocked printed velvet throw for my bed. I'll see if it hand washes. Also a faux cowhide bedspread for the bunkhouse. If I get a real one, even my dogs wouldn't be able to resist a good chew, let alone visiting dogs.

I'm waiting on the return of the rug before ordering fabric for footstool upholstery. Until two days ago footstool was a hidden telephone table with a paisley shawl hiding the top; before that I think it must have been a piano bench. I'm not stuck on that footstool which is a garage sale item circa 1980. It has the virtue of adding a different material to the room, I suppose.
June 17, 2013 at 11:18AM   
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quatorze
Nice. If you are thinking about hand washing a fabric, get a sample from the store and wash that first, so you don't ruin a large piece. With hand-blocked fabrics, it is generally best to dry-clean only, and only infrequently.

Bench is handsome; is it iron? What about painting the wood and stenciling or decoupaging the top? You might also consider a Lucite top, if you want to throw the room a curve. A little oil on a stiff brush over the metal and then wiped down will give it a glow and clean it up.
June 17, 2013 at 12:44PM     
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LB Interiors
I love that little bench. Hope you can find a place for it. It may even work in a bathroom (if you have room) for drying your feet.
June 17, 2013 at 12:48PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Good ideas, thanks. If I put a lucite top on the bench, is it likely to stand up to use in the shower itself? The bench is iron and iron rusts yet there is a lot of iron garden furniture around.
June 17, 2013 at 1:13PM     
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8dognight
I forgot to have a bench installed when the granite was put in.

Who puts lucite tops on things? Any carpenter or cabinet shop?
June 17, 2013 at 1:30PM   
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8dognight
So I wrote some acrylic company in New York about which I know nothing called Plexi-Craft to see if they can make a top for me. I asked for a quote on a top with a scrolled/curled upward edge on the short sides of the bench for a seat in either clear or tortoise or green. Couldn't help myself on the last two. I've always resisted giving the farm a name as pretentious. Now I may have to call it Delusions of Grandeur Farm.

I attached the photos just to show the two different plastics other than clear, not as objects I want to incorporate. The green looks too bright.
June 17, 2013 at 3:56PM   
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quatorze
Or D.O.G Farm for short...

It will; not standup to water in a shower. Water will find its way through microscopic holes in the paint, produce rust and stain your shower tile.
June 17, 2013 at 3:59PM     
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8dognight
In that case, the top should be clear and should scroll/curl down. Thanks. Here is a photo of the bottom of the bench. The screw will show. That's the point, I suppose. Love D.O.G. Farm abbreviation.
June 17, 2013 at 4:11PM   
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annavic
I lov the chandelier but it is too high
June 17, 2013 at 5:00PM     
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LB Interiors
I wouldn't use iron in the shower. It will rust.
June 17, 2013 at 6:35PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Patrick Dunne, who owns Lucullus Antiques in New Orleans, and his assistant Nathan Drewes came out several days ago. They are going to help me out. I think the website is down at the moment but you can look at the Lucullus FB page and on 1st Dibs see some of the store items if you're curious.
June 20, 2013 at 8:45AM   
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quatorze
Well, if you have gentlemen of THAT provenance in your back pocket, you should be all set. An amazing store in a city I know very well and love. I hope to get down there soon.
June 20, 2013 at 9:01AM     
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8dognight
I'll post occasional progress reports.
June 20, 2013 at 12:10PM     
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8dognight
It took me months to get up the nerve to get in touch with them. Ungraceful small houses are not their usual milieu so I was bashful despite the fact I met Patrick years ago.

He initially suggested that I buy an old farmhouse and move it to the farm. I vetoed the idea firmly. I wish to tame the existing errant structure with an eye toward universal access in the future. And what in the world would I do with this house after moving what would be a third house to this place? Subsequent suggestions have been less grandiose and already saved me money.
June 20, 2013 at 12:37PM   
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quatorze
That is EXACTLY how to work with a designer, especially a good designer. You must state your general parameters of style, budget, etc., so the professional has a working framework within which to develop ideas. The rules are not hard and fast; you can both feel your way as you go. That said, one should also be open to considering a designer's grander vision; what seems extravagant at the moment can be cost-saving in the long run, as well as affording you a pleasure only vaguely dreamed of. Once you are open to ideas, then you both can hash out the practicalities of the situation.

Best advice I ever heard was to LOOK at everything, even if it does not fall within your budget or perceived taste. Collect pictures from magazines and on-line and then attach a Post-It with a note as to what you liked about the image; a specific item of furniture or fabric, a color, a furniture arrangement or a room's spaciousness or just the general air the image imparts. Often, images of something you perceive as completely foreign to your situation can be looked at more dispassionately and the resulting note on what you liked about it that much more informative. A trained eye can then "interpret" the images into something new, that will fit you, your dream and your budget. That's why I hit you with an image of the color Palladian Blue, as seen used in a grand room at Bath, England. I have attached a simpler room done in the same color, with a chandelier in the same color and metal as your own, so you can see why I thought it a good fit. Delusions of grandeur are never useless in decorating, only in politics...
June 20, 2013 at 1:18PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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quatorze
As for working up the courage to contact Mr. Dunne, bravo! An old New York saying, "You don't ask, you don't get."
June 20, 2013 at 1:21PM      Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
I ordered "Sheer Opulence" and also took Ipmenache's recommendation and got some Charlotte Moss. After looking at reviews, I ordered the three oldest of hers. As I have not read it, I added the "Epicurean Collector" by Patrick Dunne and "Southern Accents." I'm not a kitchen and food related collector but look forward to reading the book. "Garden and Gun" has a piece on his farm in rural Louisiana. The first thing he did was to remove the dishwasher, a gesture and statement I am free to admire without following or even consider following.

I'm now looking for a recommendation on books about exalted country French interiors. Must be a mountain of them out there. Any thoughts?

I read every word of one of Bryan Batt's books. Sadly, in spite of enjoying it and making lots of notes, all I remember at the moment is that almost no one puts frames on good pictures any more. Also that the kinds of rugs I love are apparently out of style. Nevertheless I will stick with picture frames and oriental rugs.
June 20, 2013 at 2:10PM     
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quatorze
No frames on pictures is a silly fad. Just because someone wrote it and got it published, doesn't make it so. My grandmother collected formal antique furniture when it was unfashionable; we are forever grateful...

Lord, there are loads of books out there. Go to a book store and library and peruse some before you buy any. When you do decide to buy, access this website that will list the books as available across the country and around the world, from big box stores, on-line concerns and the mom and pop bookseller - you will find great prices and people who carry many of the great out-of-print books: http://www.bookfinder.com/

Here are some book suggestions:

Building Beauty by Michael Smith
Great Style and Decorating Style, both by House Beautiful
Mlinaric on Decorating
Decorating Magic by John Sutcliffe
The Collected Home by Darryl Carter
The House & Garden Book of Classic Rooms
Rooms To Inspire by Annie Kelly
The Great American House by Gil Schafer III
Black & White By Celerie Kemble
Southern Style by Mayfield/Southern Accents

and anything by Charles Faudree if you like French Country, but be prepared, it is a very rich helping of French Country, like a lavish gumbo or etoufee...
June 20, 2013 at 3:58PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Having toile made: I'm going to have toile made from late 19th century and early 20th century sheepdog prints that I own. Copyright is not a problem. Any suggestions on relatively inexpensive places to do it?

I have not run this past Lucullus; nontheless, I think they will like the idea. I'm thinking mostly for the bedroom with a little in the living room area.

Five different scenes are needed in my estimation. I have them and they are in keeping with traditional toile so this isn't going to look like the Dr. Who or Dia de los Muertos toiles, both of which are amusing and attractive but not the look I'm going for.
June 22, 2013 at 7:09PM   
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apple_pie_order
The Lucullus people may know who does custom fabric printing. If not, ask the Dr. Who toile makers; I think they are print on demand.
June 23, 2013 at 5:45AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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quatorze
Sounds like a fun, if expensive, undertaking. If you do find a source for making toile fabric up from old prints or your own design, please let us all know.
June 23, 2013 at 6:21AM      Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
If I can provide camera ready design, Spoonflower's software for digital fabric prints takes over and matches color as best it can or something like that. Provided the design has the right lines of pixels, their system makes the venture a frugal expenditure as such things go. If I use a service that offers more in the way of Photoshop or Illustrator skills, the project becomes more expensive.

I posted to ask if anyone reading had experience with the various places that do printing either on the Spoonflower end or the upper reaches of cost end. I found this article on digital fabric printing which is informative: http://www.trueup.net/2013/q-a/digital-printing-services-2013-edition/ and lists quite a few places. Some of the others are Fabric on Demand and Digital Textiles.

I still need to research ink, pigment, dye, and fabric types for toile. I'm ruling out silk for practical reasons.

Oh dear, I forgot that I activated some block on the computer that won't let me copy URLs.
June 23, 2013 at 7:02AM     
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
8dognight. I saw where you contacted the boys from New Orleans. Are you in Louisiana because so am I.Glad you ordered the Charlotte Moss books. You will enjoy them.
June 25, 2013 at 3:34AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Brief update: Next week Lucullus, my trusty contractor, and two old friends--a teacher of architecture at a university and his wife who is active in the Vieux Carre Commission--are all coming over at the same time. I'm already feeling overwhelmed and thinking about tea sandwiches along with wafer thin cookies.
June 28, 2013 at 4:10PM     
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quatorze
Have some Sazaracs or mint juleps mixed and ready and they will all be very happy.
June 28, 2013 at 8:08PM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
Sounds like you have everything in order with great help. Cant wait to hear their ideas! If you get a copy of January2013 Louisiana Life you will see an article about our former home.
June 28, 2013 at 8:30PM   
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8dognight
lpmenache, I looked at the article. Lovely house and furnishings. You said above that it's your former house. Did you move to another wonderful Louisiana house?
June 29, 2013 at 6:46AM   
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8dognight
I copied two images from the Louisiana Life article on lpmenache's house. Maybe he'll tell us the date the house was built because I don't think I saw that anywhere in the article. I'm guessing 1950s but I really don't know, obviously.
June 29, 2013 at 8:04AM   
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quatorze
It may be 50's, but the look is timeless.
June 29, 2013 at 8:31AM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
Thank you quatorze and 8dognight for the nice comments. The house was indeed built in the 50s. We have moved 3 doors down and across the street into a house that is a Georgian colonial which has never been touched since it was built in 1957. having a great time with it. I have been reluctant to post pictures of my home because the look is not what is normally espoused on houzz, not enough grey and neutrals and" updated things". I really don't want to listen to the disparing remarks but I knew you both would appreciate the look. One of my favorite books is 60 years of Interior Design about Eleanor Brown. Her rooms were timeless and just a few changes would update the room. when I was a child I used to sit next to her at the French furniture auctions at Parke Bernet(Sotheby's) with my parents . It was not till I was much older that I realized I actually knew her. In any case the new house will have a lot of the same furniture but in a new setting. Lets see if I am as successful with it.
June 29, 2013 at 6:41PM     
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
8dognight, I have used a chinese garden seat as a bench in a shower. This works really well to sit or prop your leg on etc.
June 30, 2013 at 2:03AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Hmm. I wonder if they come up at auction. You can't see it in the bathroom photos I posted but I have some Imari on the counter between the sinks to hold soap and toothpaste. The colors aren't quite right but the heck with it, better holding soap and toothpaste than in a closet, I say. I wonder if there are Japanese garden seats. I'm thinking a scenic one as opposed to solid colored.
June 30, 2013 at 5:59AM   
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8dognight
Lpmenache, I suspect there are a lot of people who would like to see what you're doing with your new house. I want to see the foyer in particular if the staircase is especially good. Does the house have a sunroom?

"Sheer Opulence" just got here yesterday. Great book. Magical.
June 30, 2013 at 6:12AM   
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apple_pie_order
I think many posters on Houzz are fans of modern things. But there are some who like antiques, older than the politely termed "vintage". Decorating with excellent quality antiques but mixing in first rate modern functional things such as sofas is still appreciated. There are at least a few paint color consultants who post occasionally whose websites show a nuanced palette based on homeowner furnishings, house style and lighting.
June 30, 2013 at 6:40AM        Thanked by 8dognight
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
apple-pie.... I totally agree with you. It is the posters who answer a question about rug color with a post of how much better the room would look if it were painted grey as if they had just invented that color. They also do not understand the look of timelessness. Why does everything have to look like today? I, for myself( and I mean for myself less i am misunderstood) and most of my clients want a room that will not look dated when the next fad comes along. How long do we really think that barrel shaped lampshades are going to be the rage. They will always stay but not be in the forefront. In the 70's, a shade with extremely slanted sides( named after an oriental hat) was all the rage and now you hardly see them. I guess my point is that the posters need to be more sensitive to everyones particular style and not just spout off the current vogue. I like traditional with a modern twist, lots of color and things that no one else may have to add a touch of originality. I grew up in a house with fine antiques(m.ore like period rooms rather than rooms for living). In my last house is used some upholstered seating from Baker Henredon etc.. My father always said he liked my rooms except for the new sofas so go figure. I do think it is important to learn from the old master designers like Eleanor Brown and Billy Baldwin. They have so mush to teach us by examining their rooms. I think that they understood that good things cost money and it takes time to acheive a look, no matter what that look. HGTV has really dumbed down interior design with shows that transform a room for $500 in less than a few hours. Please! Well I guess I have ranted enough.
8dognight. Yes the house has a nice staircase but no sunroom. I would send a picture but it has not been properly menachified(as my friends say) so will leave it to later for a reveal. I may get brave enough to post the house when all done.yes I enjoyed "Sheer Opulence", I would love to know where you are located. You can send an email to my email at lpmenache@yahoo.com if you dont what it all over the internet.
In regards to the garden seats they come in all shapes sizes and colors. Just keep you eyes open.
June 30, 2013 at 12:08PM     
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8dognight
Lpmenache, the photos of your previous house don't show up as well on Houzz as they do on the "Louisiana Life" website. The incredible oaks got cropped out in the first photo, and in the second, the pictures on the walls became invisible. If you have some good digital shots, could you post them? I would really like to see the current house as well.
June 30, 2013 at 12:25PM   
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apple_pie_order
Lampshade styles have a shelf life of about 10 years. Shapes come around again in about 50 or 60 years. The problem is when a shade has to be replaced and all the current fashionable shades are simply the wrong shape for the lamp. This is not a worry for those who can commission a shade for $100 or $200. That isn't most people.

I agree that a $500 room makeover often looks like exactly that. But it can be fun if you are 22 and experimenting with new things, or if you have never painted a room before or shopped in the furniture area of the local Goodwill. Then you'll discover why all those retro, vintage, etc. lamps have no shades... barrel, conical or otherwise.

Houzz does seem to have a lot of posts where the advice is paint the walls Revere Pewter, paint the oak cabinets white, and buy your furniture from Ikea. I wonder if we are in for a ten year cycle of gray walls everywhere, now that we are finished with "HGTV green". Maybe in fifteen years, we'll have a rash of people learning to strip the white paint off their cabinets to "reveal the fine old oak", just like back in the 1970's when stripping furniture was all the rage. Ikea has its place, but it would be nice if there were similar-sized used furniture stores where good quality furniture could be recycled to new owners. Better for the planet, too.
June 30, 2013 at 2:48PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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8dognight
Still undecided on emailing lpmenache, I googled again and found a blog called Visual Vamp. The photos in "Louisiana Life" are not as good as the photos I saw on Visual Vamp. Here are three.

One must not have attached. I'll try again.
June 30, 2013 at 2:52PM   
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8dognight
Trying again with two more images.
June 30, 2013 at 2:57PM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
The photos you just posted were from 2008 in Louisiana Home and Garden. Valerie Hart, the visual vamp, has a book coming out in September called Lousian Proud and we have a whole chapter to ourselves called more is more. Those will be the best pictures of the old house as they were taken literally one week before we started to dismantle the house to move which took three months of evening.packing and weekends.
The new house is literally still under renovations and there are no pictures to post really. bedrooms are now being painted and then floors sanded. Drapery fabrics are being chosen and then of course have to go to the workroom. using different colors than I have in the past, somethings being recovered, others will be used as before. So it will be a while till we are photo ready.
If the houzzers saw all those "objet truve'" in the Secretary Abatant they would probably start telling me to edit edit edit. I am going to be a little more selective this time around with what I put out and rotate it.
I do think we have the same decorative style and would love to meet if we could. From the articles you know all about me.
June 30, 2013 at 4:22PM      Thanked by 8dognight
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LB Interiors
I agree with apple_pie and Ipmenache.
I'm tired of the trends, everyone will seem to have rooms with a gray wall. Kitchens with stainless steel and granite. Repainted vintage and antique furniture. It's considered outdated if you have oak or brass fixtures. Where is the personality for these rooms? Not everyone's shines through. I like difference and everyone is different.
June 30, 2013 at 4:54PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
Actually I am being told by many that brass or gold fixtures are on the way back in. At a high end fixture store in Houston we found more gold tone than silver toned fixtures. The one we liked was $13,000.00. Needless to say we passed.
Yes LB I am tired of "stepford rooms" all in shades of grey with digitized art from web sites. What happened to real art work , easily found at university fairs from the art departments. So it does not have to be expensive.
June 30, 2013 at 8:11PM      Thanked by 8dognight
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homewaremeetgirl
@Ipmenache,Look at these lights.beautiful and cheap!!!However,I don't know if this website is real. http://www.jollyhome.com/ceiling-lights_89
June 30, 2013 at 8:24PM   
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LB Interiors
I think a new take on brass fixtures is back. I just bought one that is finished champagne bronze. The company said it is new on the market.
June 30, 2013 at 10:33PM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
@home.... found site and it appears real. If there is something there you like go for it as it sure is cheap.
June 30, 2013 at 11:09PM     
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julieloveandrews
Ipmenache is right,please go for it if you really like!
June 30, 2013 at 11:23PM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
Just did my professional profile so I now show up as Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors rather than lpmenache
June 30, 2013 at 11:41PM        Thanked by 8dognight
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nwduck
LB Interiors: As I am not a "silver" person, I'd like to know where you found the champagne bronze fixture. Also agree on the "grey" fad. Geez. I live in the Pacific Northwest, and we refer to most months of the year as being under the Permacloud. Like I need that INSIDE too.
June 30, 2013 at 11:49PM     
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8dognight
Here's an update: Camilla Franklin of Blissett Textile is working on the D. O. G. Farm Toile design.

My contractor doesn't get back to me until the 19th of August to paint the entire interior, reside the exterior, and tear out the kitchen tile so the floor person can come in.

Patrick Dunne has convinced me to use only one of the couches in the living room and move the other into my library/sitting room, both to be recovered in a caramelish, light tobacco colored leather. The television is going inside a handsome armoire quatre portes. The fireplace surround and hearth will be slate with a different firebox. A suitable old mantel has not yet been located. The brass chandelier is going in my bedroom; living room chandeliers will be black iron as I believe LB Interiors and several other people also suggested early on.

The big pastoral picture stays over the mantel; the large mirror from my bedroom--there's a photo of it somewhere in this thread--goes on the wall behind the dinner table. The captain's chairs are being retired to the box room as extra seating. The dining room chairs will be os de mouton.

Garden seat for master bath: Maison Pompeii suggested one. Several are coming up soon at New Orleans auction.

I have the new living room rug down temporarily and have attached several photos.
July 20, 2013 at 1:59PM     
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LB Interiors
Beautiful rug! Yay, a lot going on and great progress.
July 20, 2013 at 4:25PM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
Glad to see things are coming along. i always felt the large painting should go over the mantle. I do have some fabulous wrought iron chandeliers for sale right now in my shop. I will send you a picture of them. Are you going to go to the Thursday night preview deal at the auction house? I plan to drive in for it. Maybe we could meet.
July 21, 2013 at 2:30AM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
I also have a set of 6 os de mouton chairs availalble
July 21, 2013 at 6:18AM   
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LB Interiors
Sorry to say that the large painting fits the dining room wall so well. It brings in your style to that space as well as the living room. Flows nicely.
July 21, 2013 at 11:46AM   
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LB Interiors
I'm sorry 'nwduck'. forgot to get back to you on the champagne bronze new finish for faucets. They are from www.deltafaucets.com. Other manufacturers may have them now too.
July 21, 2013 at 1:11PM     
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hbmiller
I think you and your style are really interesting! I would paint the walls and ceiling a much lighter version of the blue in your rug. Like 25% color 75% white. I think it would be a beautiful background for you amazing art work. I would remove the wainscot. I agree the large painting should go in the dining room. Love your dogs!
July 21, 2013 at 2:06PM     
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8dognight
Maison Pompeii, I won't be going to the preview on Thursday. That's a busy day for me. I usually leave absentee bids at local auctions anyway. Are the stretchers underneath the chairs from side to side across the middle straight or curved?
July 21, 2013 at 2:44PM   
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Maison Pompeii Antiques and Interiors
It is one stretcher across the middle in the os de mouton shape.
July 21, 2013 at 6:07PM   
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lionnessone
Any up dates on your home project?
January 25, 2014 at 6:58PM   
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