Range fan?
amywaldner
July 13, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Do you really need a fan? Can't I just put a window behind it, it's not gas :)
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Fred S
Where do you live?
July 13, 2013 at 5:54pm   
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amywaldner
British Columbia
July 13, 2013 at 5:58pm   
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Fred S
Is it new construction? I can't recall if I looked up that area, but you may need some sort of mechanical system to get rid of humidity just like a bathroom. It may need to be a separate system that can be in the ceiling or wall, but not necessarily a hood. Some places allow a well designed hvac system to be all you need. And some places even allow just a window anywhere in the room. Ask your building department directly, because most builders like to take the easy way out and just tell you that you need one.
July 13, 2013 at 6:08pm     
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PRO
Alexis Burris Designs
A fan is invaluable if you cook on the stovetop, saute or simmer etc. No fan will leave you with an excess of splatter & grease bits on your countertop or walls around your range. The updraft also helps to pull the heat, splatter, fumes & smoke.... heaven forbid something scorches. Just a thought;)
July 13, 2013 at 6:32pm   
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amywaldner
Thanks:) I have one now that I never use..I hate the noise of fans and just open a window :)
July 13, 2013 at 7:00pm   
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PRO
Scott Design, Inc.
Air borne oil not only gets on tops, cabinets and walls in the kitchen, it also makes its way into the rest of the home and lands on fabrics and carpet. it damages, weakens and discolors the fibers not to mention provides a great nutritional source for dust mites. Look into replacing your existing hood with one that has a "low sone" motor. It makes much less noise.
July 13, 2013 at 7:23pm     
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Kate Baron
The reason an exhaust fan is preferred is because of the directionality of the air flow-- while air from a window will do a good job of dispersing the air rising from your hot stove, depending on the wind direction and air flow through your house, the fresh air coming in may actually push the oil-laden air further into your home. A good exhaust fan will pull the heated air up and out, reducing the buildup of oils over time.
July 13, 2013 at 8:20pm   
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PRO
Custom Dwellings
If space allows, installing a remote blower may be of interest to you- gets the noise further away and is very effective when sized properly for your configuration. Also there are all sorts of exhaust fans on the market- look for one with a very low "sone rating" the lower the sone the quieter the fan.
July 13, 2013 at 8:24pm     
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amywaldner
I don't fry foods so I don't get oil droplets..ugh..I guess I should still get one though..I'll just find a quiet one :)
July 13, 2013 at 8:44pm   
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Scott Design, Inc.
Even if you steam foods using a little oil, steam frozen vegetables typically flavored with oil, simmer canned soups also flavored with oil, poach fish, crock-pot stews, sautée beef for spaghetti sauce, etc, then you are sending oil into the air.
July 15, 2013 at 8:40am   
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