Hansel & Gretel need HELP updating the exterior front of their home!!
Holly Woodworth
July 20, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Help Is there anyone out there who can make any recommendations to give the front of this tired old charming cape/cottage/Victorian/arts (I'm not really sure what it is) a new facelift? Need recommendation for painting colors, awnings, stone/cedar on the A/frame, new diamond pattern windows, cooper awnings, or extending the roofline to include a covered porch so that there is still coverage from the rain over the front door, or any other suggestion.

Painters are not able to help and I've spoken with a few contractors that want me to redo in the house in vinyl siding (I believe that would ruin the character of the home and there wouldn't be any money left for design changes or upgrades).

I have 15-20K to work and this includes putting a new roof on the front half hopefully with architectural shingles. I would like to keep enough money in the budget to have the entire house painted to match the front.

Thoughts or recommendations for a contractor?
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Harding Construction & Sustainable Solutions
You plan of attack is right on. Start with the roof then move on to the painting. Why are contractors suggesting vinyl siding, is the stucco shot?
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 5:55PM
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zennifer
So cute! 1940's?
I agree... Keep the vinyl off your house. Vinyl windows, too. In fact, I'd keep your old ones...wood replaces,nets are expensive, and old windows can be restored pretty easitly with some elbow grease.

Stone would look great...I have a particular 1948 house in mind that has a stone front in my area. It's the big round stones. Looks great.
4 Likes   July 20, 2013 at 6:04PM
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zennifer
By the way, I think it's a 1940's Tudor revival.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:04PM
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Holly Woodworth
Yes it was built in 1940. I will use Tudor revival as a Google search to learn more for period ideas. I am definitely looking to enhance and keep the cottage look. As you can see a tree did quite a bit of damage to the wrought iron railings and those will also be replaced also.

Would you put the stone on the A-frame or on the front? I was thinking maybe cedar shake for the A frame and/or stone for the front (not sure if that would be to busy for such a small profile.
   July 20, 2013 at 6:08PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Congrats! Cool cottage! Step one, remove the metal awnings! Like right now! Then nice "architectural" series composition roofing in a darker color. (Black & dark grey simulated slate stagger exposure). Can't tell from this photo but the siding looks to be in good shape, don't let anyone talk you into vinyl or metal siding! Then you are down to a new front door and exterior colors. The color experts on houzz will jump in to help with that! Great house! Enjoy....
10 Likes   July 20, 2013 at 6:09PM
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zennifer
I'd put it on the a frame.
3 Likes   July 20, 2013 at 6:12PM
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zennifer
You don't need stone, however, to have an ADORABLE house. :)
4 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 6:12PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Yes I agree Tudor Revival Style. You might look into plank shutters for the window on the right side in this photo?
5 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 6:12PM
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Holly Woodworth
Thanks Kevin I pulled the first awning off today and will get the others removed asap. I have kept them for several years now because I thought the face of the house would become to drab and plain without something to create an accent since the two windows on the front are different sizes and the long roof overpowers the the front of the house. Do I go to someplace different to speak with color experts? Thanks so much.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:12PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Shutters and flower box for that window on the right side of the Entry?
11 Likes   July 20, 2013 at 6:17PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
No the "color experts" will jump in on this post as it matures. Stay tuned! Also, maybe canvas awnings to replace the metal ones? I like the iron "spear" awnings!
   July 20, 2013 at 6:23PM
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Scates ltd
Love your Tudor but the white needs to go. Deep gray or pale yellow would look great with your roof. Add a iron looking window planters. Remove the red metal over hangs and replace if needed with fabric canopy. An iron look settee with cushions to the right and three large flower pots in a variety of heights. If you need replacement windows a dark bronze would be attractive with diamond grids. A tree on the right corner in an evergreen like a blue ice cypress or blue spruce if you live in a cold climate, zone 1-5. Good luck!
5 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 6:25PM
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Holly Woodworth
Thanks for the photo. I had considered that but ruled it out because the railing on the right side of the porch comes under the window and there wouldn't be room for a flower box. : (
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:25PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Also, I think a new "English Cottage" landscape theme would enhance the "fairytale" style!
2 Likes   July 20, 2013 at 6:25PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Scates Do you think I can pull off a Grey Green Sage keeping either a white or beige trim. One of the painters I spoke with was strongly pressuring me to keep it white but I love the natural green tones. Once upon a time I wanted to coordinate burgundy trim in but have been unable to find any photos with Burgandy and green that would compliment such a small frame.
   July 20, 2013 at 6:29PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Good Stuff @scates ltd. !! Here comes the color and landscape ideas! Yes if no room for flower box, don't crowd it!! But still think "real" plank shutters would be cool!! (Hinges and tie back hardware)!!
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:30PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Kevin Yes the landscaping got crushed and I realized when I took the photo how overgrown the Holly had become and believe it needs to be removed completely. I have Deer that pass through my yard looking for Dinner so any landscaping must not be a favorite.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:31PM
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Holly Woodworth
I have spent 2 weeks working on ideas for this project. I am so impressed and grateful for your ideas and time to respond. Many thanks. I will be hiring a contractor soon and it will be nice to pass along a few ideas of my own without being pushed into something that is not what I want
   July 20, 2013 at 6:40PM
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brickln
They'll find you, Holly. Just keep posting pictures! I think stone or stucco on the A and wide, arched moldings around the windows, shutters optional The siding looks fine.
Chateau Cache
2001 showcase
The Rivendell Manor
http://www.sandtoft.com/images/cms/SwissCottage.jpg
5 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 6:40PM
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Amy Main
This 1927 stone Tudor is just a block away from the Univ of Tulsa. I'm a realtor here and fell in love with this home, but helped a client buy it!
5 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 6:44PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin the siding is in great shape but does need to be painted since it is chalking quite badly which is why I've asked for painting suggestions). Even if I do shutters and/or molding around the windows I'm stuck in the dilemma of what size shape awning over the door as it is nice to have some cover from the rain.
   July 20, 2013 at 6:46PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Yes Holly, do your research and have a "wish list" before you meet with a contractor. Posting your ideas on houzz is a great forum to help bounce ideas around! We are here to help, have fun with your project and stay focused on the big picture! Also remember to post the "after" pictures so we can all see what a great job you did!
   July 20, 2013 at 6:48PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
COOL HOUSE AMY!! I can see why the emotional attachment! Also good example for this post!!
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:49PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Amy Small world I'm a Realtor in the DC metro area. I really love this home also wow what a beauty
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:50PM
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brickln
I love how the darker shades look on the clapboards:
The Point

For the roof, I would just extend the whole thing and have a decorative fascia board edging. Maybe one of those corbels at the peak?

Chicago Residence Exterior

Porch Detail
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:53PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Kevin regarding the photo of your awning would you choose strips as shown or do you think a solid would look better if I were to make the A-frame an accent piece using cedar/stone/stucco/or just a different color. Also were you thinking of the windows in addition to the door or go with the plank shutters on the windows and the awning for the door?
   July 20, 2013 at 6:54PM
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Amy Main
Well it's especially unusual for that era because the floor plan is a split level!!! It was in normal working order, 2 bed, 1 bath 1700 SF sold for $125,000.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 6:54PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Bricklin I have clapboard under the aluminum. I agree the darker color is magnificent but I believe my tiny house might get crushed by such a dark color.
   July 20, 2013 at 6:57PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ Amy My first reaction was for $125,000 what year was that? That home would sell for close to $300,000 in my neighborhood. I love love love it as I have always been drawn to the charming feel of older homes.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 7:00PM
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Holly Woodworth
Here is the detached carriage house just to the left of the main house. I would love to help dress that up also as both of these properties have been rentals for the majority of their existence and I really want to accent their wonderful features. I have always thought shutters might bring some color but they won't fit. All suggestions are welcome. The siding here is in perfect condition however the wood trim desperately needs to be painted.
   July 20, 2013 at 7:04PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
Hey Holly, how about a trellis over the garage doors to fill in that forehead area over the doors? And yes shutters can't work on those dormer windows! Sure would be nice changing out those garage doors for a "cottage" carriage house style doors like the photo I posted?
12 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 7:15PM
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Holly Woodworth
Current front photo of carriage house
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 7:15PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
@holly, don't think I would do "striped" canvas awnings! I think this small charming cottage requires a simple color palette!
3 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 7:17PM
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brickln
Could you just make an arched opening and treat the A as your covered entrance, placing the exterior door along the wall of the rest of the house? It doesn't seem to be adding useable floor space.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 7:18PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Kevin that's a thought since there is a trellis on the side/entry of the apartment. If I did that should they both be painted white and if they were white would I need to change the base color of the siding. it is currently in great shape and doesn't need to be painted at this time but I would to coordinate with the house.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 7:18PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
GREAT garage doors! Funny how you were two steps ahead of me!!! But, still think a trellis over each garage door would help fill in that blank wall space above the doors!
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 7:19PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
@brickIn, good idea, that would create a covered entry portal so guests could stand protected from the elements! Also protects the new front door from the weather!
   July 20, 2013 at 7:21PM
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Kevin Patrick O'Brien Architect, Inc.
If you recess the entry I could see a new "full arched" front door like the one Amy Main posted above!
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 7:24PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin here is a photo from the inside. The A frame gives a foyer aspect since the stairs are immediately inside the main house. Without the A the front door would literally be opened butted next to the first stair heading up.
   July 20, 2013 at 7:25PM
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zennifer
If strip the aluminum off and restore the clapboards. :) the smaller profile will fit the house much better.
   July 20, 2013 at 7:29PM
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brickln
Yes, Kevin, and if a custom arched Tudor door isn't in the budget, it won't be seen from the curb anyway.
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 7:29PM
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judianna20
It is indeed a storybook house. I would stone the Tudor part. The rest is very Cape Cod with that ridge line and I would continue the cottage look with a different fench.



Is the siding in bad repair? How about stucco?
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 7:36PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Fist things first as always new home owners have a massive wish list that far exceeds the budget .Anyone willing to give a ball park for her wish list? A lot more than 15 or 20 K . Get estimates for your wish list items something's you'll have to do later. Roof yes, paint yes to your colors, some stone yes, new railing not all of it just what needs to be fixed, landscape yes, extending roofline will take a lot of the budget ,if you go this way you'll have to give up something else. with just what I have said yes to your at roughly 8 to 10 k or higher, that's if you have nothing structurally wrong with the place, you don't know what surprises you may come across when the roof shingles come of that can eat away at the budget. What am I saying is be prepared to pay 20% more than what you have, just for the things we have mentioned here. No vinyl on the house stucco and wood accents with some stone , you don't need a lot of stone to get the look you want. Strategically placed stone would do the trick to save some money but don't buy veneer stone they tend to be more costly than real stone plus it looks better . if you'd like a drawing showing you these elements and colors with landscape, new shutters,, roof shingles, on your home to show your contractors we can help . visit my idea book to find out how and see many examples of the 2d PROCESS .
4 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 20, 2013 at 7:42PM
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Holly Woodworth
@judyg I have spent hours searching homes on Houzz and I did see this one and liked it very much. It gave me ideas as to use a specialty window design for the window on the left side of the A-frame since it is much smaller than the window on the right. In the photo I liked the look of the double window to the right of the door and wondered if it would be worth it to have the existing window space expanded to handle a double window to offset the front. However if I did that there would definitely be no room for shutters of any sort. Also if I may ask what is a fench?
   July 20, 2013 at 7:43PM
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brickln
Then I think it's worthwhile to extend the A to the end of the slab, Holly, and center the exterior stairs.

Or extend just the top part of the roof like the Chicago Exterior above, adding posts like the Porch Detail, or brackets, or leave it plain if it suits your taste. Not enough space for batten board, but you could add a finial like the Rivendell Manor photo. If this option is chosen, I would use stucco on the whole A rather than stone because a stone awning wouldn't look right, and there won't be enough surface showing on the rest of the A for the stone to have impact.

If it takes the whole budget to get the roof and entry right, so be it, although I doubt it will. The house is small enough that future improvements won't be costly, especially if you're willing to work one side at a time.
   July 20, 2013 at 7:44PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful. Great advice. I've gotten a quote for 4K for front of roof gutters etc. that can be seen and 7K to paint whole house a different color. Railing on porch is 3,200. That leaves about 5K to spend on awnings etc. Windows are 1200 installed and that is from a separate pool of money not previously mentioned. I think it is possible to pull this together.
   July 20, 2013 at 7:54PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Yes but 20% more .Your welcome .It's always the little things that pop up by surprise that brake the budget rotten wood , termite problems ,cracks and water problems to the foundation before you go all the way with modifications make sure all these things are checked off as good .
1 Like   July 20, 2013 at 8:33PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin I am reading and rereading your post and need to ask you a few questions for clarification. 1) Extend the A to the end of the slab? So you are suggesting to double the length of the A to twice what it is so that you can have a covered portico (like the photo) and then extend the existing roof line forward so that you don't have a long tunnel effect. Not sure what what you mean with brackets or posts.
   July 20, 2013 at 8:41PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful I am extremely grateful for your advise. I do realize that you are passing along some really good advise. I will be cautious.
   July 20, 2013 at 8:58PM
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brickln
I'm suggesting to two options, Holly. Double the entire thing- the extension would be a shell to use as a covered entry, with the slab as it's foundation. Make the entrance arched and face it with stone if you like.

Or you could extend just the section of the roofline above the current awning and add those posts or brackets for decoration. It would be small enough the it wouldn't need structural support, so you could add that later if you want it for decoration. I would use stucco in this case because the same roof would be shared, and the new awning section obviously wouldn't support stone. I suppose it could be done with river rock, but....

I just came across this example of a straddled roofline, which you can see over this playset's doorway. I think your peek is too sharp for that, maybe? If not, that treatment could be used for either the awning or the extended alcove entry. Since it wouldn't disturb the current roof, it should be more cost effective. It also allows you to save that project down for the road if it's not in the budget right now.

The playset also has bump outs with and without brackets. The little bird house at the front peek gives an idea of what option 2 would look like in terms of the roofline. Yours would extend further down to cover the width of the door. How cool would it look with if you could add a lit leaded window in that peek?



   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 21, 2013 at 3:29AM
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brickln
Holly, what will you be replacing the railings with and can you do without? It's hard to see how the stairs work- it looks like there's a railing to the side and one straight out?

For color, I like the Chateau Cache above. Goes well for the garage, too. Maybe swap the body/trim colors on one of the buildings for contrast. I'm surprised the color people haven't chimed in yet!
   July 21, 2013 at 5:25AM
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judianna20
Oh, gee, Ciata, no thanks. We are all taken.
1 Like   July 21, 2013 at 11:04AM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin You are a Rockstar!!!! Wow Wow Wow I can hardly believe what a fabulous photo. This is the first I have seen to get a visual of this concept. I do believe I have plenty of room on the slab to extend it if the budget allows (see photos) for it's own separate covered entrance, and I believe the overhang is a solid secondary more economic option. I had thought about this but wondered if the A-frame of the house could handle that much bulk on the front
   July 21, 2013 at 11:24AM
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brickln
I'm glad you're pleased! It sure looks like you have the room to do it- the current awning doesn't appear to be going past the railing, so the extension shouldn't interfere with the walkway.

When you say handle the bulk do you mean physical weight or appearance? Obviously you need a structural engineer to be sure. I would think the full extension would be supported by its own posts. As for scale, to me as long as it's under 1/3-1/2 the width of the house, it should look ok. If you think it looks too weighty, it can be done in glass with wood supports, or wrought iron if you're still incorporating that in your plan. The angles are getting tighter now so you may want to consult a finish carpenter- preferably one who likes a challenge! If it breaks the budget, it will still look awesome with the right sized concave awning, so no worries.

These are helpful photos, Holly. This house just keeps getting cuter! I see there's a brick foundation that comes into play as well. Makes me think that green or camel/taupe is the way to go. Do you know what shape the siding under the aluminum is in?
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 21, 2013 at 12:23PM
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zennifer
What is under the siding on the a?

I ask because on an old house we had, someone had sides over a lovely brick cottage in "maintenance free siding". It would not at all be abnormal for there to be rock or brick already there and covered yp.
1 Like   July 21, 2013 at 12:29PM
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Holly Woodworth
@BrickIn First thanks for seeing the same cuteness potential in the house that I do, now maybe folk can understand my desire to give the old girl a new look. Second in terms of Bulk I was referencing appearance as you would be adding a bump out to a bump out and my concern is if this look would overwhelm the front of the house since the actual amount is siding is so small compared to the A. and the steep roof. Third how would glass/rod iron be incorporated (are you meaning do the top "awning area above the front door as in the example on the tree house. You also mentioned a concave awning and that has thrown me for a bit of a loop as I've gotten lost in where the concave portion comes into the picture.

@zennifer & BrickIn I have included photos of the clapboard under the aluminum siding. The aluminum is in great condition with the exception of the paint chalking off and desperately needing to be painted.

I have also included a few photos taken from the Left side of the house and you can see the door leading to the basement under the concrete porch and screened in side porch.
   July 21, 2013 at 2:35PM
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simplify52
Such potential!!! Did you see the tudor here on houzz with the copper awning? I don't know how to attach a photo, but I'll try now and get back if it doesn't work. BRB
   July 21, 2013 at 2:42PM
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simplify52
Sorry, I'm a pitiful excuse of current day technology. I searched under tudor exteriors and found what I am talked about. It's "Remodeling in Roseland". Let me know if you can't find it. Sorry just don't know how to get it from that page to this one.
   July 21, 2013 at 2:52PM
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Holly Woodworth
@simplify52 I found it and included it in the post. Thanks, for the input. This was my original idea with cedar shake behind it, but the consensus here seems to believe stone would make the biggest impact on the A. Here is the photo of the cedar that I was thinking about[houzz=Remodeling in Roseland] houzz=Exterior] [houzz=Island Treehouse]
1 Like   July 21, 2013 at 3:03PM
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brickln
Holly, on the Roseland picture, that oiled bronze canopy over the door is a concave shaped awning. It can be made from a variety of materials, and would look fabulous even in canvas the extension doesn't work.
If you go with the extension, yes, the amount of siding surface will be small in relation to the roofing. The added charm would be an arched entry. You could add only the a roof and leave off the face- many a frame homes have exaggerated overhangs. If you live in an inclement area like say ski country, I think it would be worth that tradeoff and expense, but if not an awning makes better sense given your budget.
As for glass, you could build an arbor in front of the existing opening and add a glass roof, or place brackets on the wall and lay the glass like a shed roof. This would be the least weighty in appearance, but expensive. You can cut costs by using acrylic or poly on the arbor; wouldn't recommend for the shed roof.
Re: tree house picture, the awning roof can be a direct extension of the current roof. That first bump out on the left has an example of that above the gothic window. If you look closely at the bump out itself, it has the support brackets we've been talking about. So a structure like that could be straddled directly below the current a line and serve as the awning. You might also fit a small window in that structure and hang your porch light there.
You have a significant amount of brick which is fantastic and needs to be considered in your design.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 21, 2013 at 4:12PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Brickin I have had my eye on this awning before getting on Houzz any thoughts and suggestions?

I'm not so sure I can envision the glass arbor approach.

Love the ideas generated from the treehouse.

You had previously mentioned stucco for the A. If I did that instead of stone to save money would you recommend adding a colored dye or leaving it in the white color and using color in painting the main siding.

I live in the DC metro area (Alexandria) and we only get snow a couple times a year and usually less than 12 inches at a time per storm.

Most of our homes here are center hall colonials with brick on the front and siding on the sides and rear, could I pull off a hardy plank siding for the front only in a cedar shake style with coordinating paint color on the sides and rear using the existing aluminum siding, or am I better off leaving the front alone (aside from painting) and focusing my time and attention to the A.

Also would this Concave Awning fight with the plank shutters mentioned in an earlier post for the right side of the house?.

You are a trooper and I greatly appreciate you sticking in with me for 24 hours with advice.
1 Like   July 21, 2013 at 5:08PM
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zennifer
Is that pic of the clapboards the aflame? It would not be unusual for there to be different sidings on the different parts.

It looks repairable...the easiest is of course to reprint. The clapboards will still be there later. :)
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 21, 2013 at 5:08PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ zennifer the photo shows the condition of the clapboard where a sliding door was added on the porch it is the same under the A (I spoke with the previous owners). Great advise on not changing the front I will stick with the plan to only paint the original aluminum siding the same color on all 4 sides.
   July 21, 2013 at 5:27PM
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Holly Woodworth
Still waiting for the color folks to jump into the conversation :-)
   July 21, 2013 at 5:30PM
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brickln
Holly, I like the awning, but I think it's more stately than cottagey. If you're going with the wrought iron, I guess it could work, but it may need to be custom due to size and thus costly.
I'd focus on the roof and the A. Since I'd do the roof with a wood shake style, the A would be stone or stucco, colored to coordinate with the siding, which for now would be all painted the same. I'd use a speared awning, and use remaining time and resources fixing the rest of the entry for now.
A color ideas.
Good luck!
Salem Avenue Renovation

Ellen Grasso Inc
1 Like   July 21, 2013 at 6:24PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Here is something to go by.
14 Likes   July 21, 2013 at 7:40PM
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victorianbungalowranch
The style of your house is Minimalist Tudor Cottage, sometimes called Tudoresque. http://architecture.about.com/od/20thcenturytrends/tp/midcentury-American-Homes.htm

It basically is a style derived from Storybook/Tudor Cottages of the 20s-40s, but with less expensive materials. It was a way to dress up post-war houses, basically a Cape Cod with a picturesque entry added. These were built mostly in the late 30s to mid 50s.

Some consider it a subset of Tudor Revival, but it is quite different in character and scale and materials.

The "A" is what is called a cat's slide roof, and if you take the siding off, it is probably curved, not angled. Assymetrical entries were very popular at one time and in my neck of the woods, there must have been a contractor who specialized in them, because they are slapped onto many types of homes, including Foursquares and Folk Victorians. Not so great on the wrong house, especially with picture windows to match.

I think the basic idea with Everything Beautiful Home Designs is good, perhaps with a bit of tweaking. I would NOT use the keystone window casing though, and the vent is a bit oversized.

Iron railings are appropriate for this style of house and I would leave the steps as they are, especially since the most used entrance is on the side and this is mostly for show. It is quite expensive to demo and replace the steps, esp. for so many. That pad is in decent shape, so I would keep the arrangement, at least for now.

Save that project for another day and focus your budget to replace the entire roof (which must be leaking--if not then why the blue tarps) and some cosmetic improvements to the "A", landscaping clean-up, edging the gravel driveway, especially around your house and paint. I would take a look at the gutters too--got some crazy angles going on, esp. on the side.

I would not add a canopy with posts--it would cover up the front of your cute little house and is not true to the style. I do like the idea of the pergola on the carriage house though--I did a cheaper flat trellis on my house, and it is enough to help--just be sure to add a little depth to make it easier to train the vines and allow for drainage.

You must have some backyard for outdoor space with that big carriage house out back. It is unusual to have such a small house and such a big garage--makes me wonder if it replaced an American Foursquare, which is what your neighbor appears to be.

I would also check the aluminum on the whole house. Is moisture getting under there? Just because it is covered up, the old siding could be rotting under there. Make sure there isn't any trapped moisture and caulk well around windows and doors and other weak area, but make sure there is a gap on the bottom. Probably has some slits in the clapboard to all moisture to evaporate--never cover these up. Aluminum siding can be primed and painted when it starts chalking, and dents can be fixed with Bondo.

Oh man, they sided over the window casings! I hate that! Not much you can do until you replace the siding.

White is the most common color for this sort of house, but others are certainly possible, such as butter yellow, sage green, gray, tan, etc..., even candy colors, depending on the effect you want. I would consider keeping the two side awnings too, very period, until you can afford the copper canopy (go simple though, and allowing it to weather to verdigris is nice) which are pretty pricey. Fabric is cheaper, but less durable, If fabric, get the kind with open sides and a low contrast strip, possibly a shaped border. One with a shaped top may be possible over the front door.

Do you have renters out back? It would be nice to have some income coming in, and the tax write offs are nice. I've been gradually fixing up a rental duplex for 10 years, preparing for the day it is our retirement home. The depreciation period for structural and mechanical is 29.5 years, and the schedules get complicated, but it has become a little tax shelter for us.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 21, 2013 at 9:08PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything beautiful Wow thank you for your time putting this together. I knew I wanted to try to pull off having grey/green and the brown roof does a nice job pulling it all together. However since the carriage house to the left has the gray roof do you see this as conflicting with the main house or would it not matter even though they share the same driveway and are only about 20 feet apart (Carriage house can be seen in the previous photos I uploaded) I particularly loved how you stopped the trim on the a frame at the Gutters along the roof line. I also wanted to ask you about the cedar shingles on the front? Since I won't have enough money to replace the whole house, would you still recommend including them into the project? Once again thanks for continuing to follow my progress as I take baby steps forward
   July 21, 2013 at 9:08PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
I use this 2D process exclusively with my customers, to date I have not had a customer not like the drawings capabilities to help them visualize their projects . When I do a deck design or something that requires a architect or structural engineer we take the conceptual drawing to them, they review the drawing and create a set of plans for us stamped with their seal . If it's a simple cosmetic job not requiring a set of plans we just meet with our contractor. We then meet with our licensed contractors who provide us pricing .Once we have selected a contractor we don't just say here you go have fun, no we supervise to ensure the project is being built to exact artistic value, on the job all day every day. The project usually looks much better than the drawings once completed. That's the point of the conceptual drawing to provide a window into something you are planning. It really helps . You should now take the drawing to the pros on houzz and architects to get there expert advise. As I do at home.
   July 22, 2013 at 9:14AM
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victorianbungalowranch
For economy reasons, I would focus on the "A" portion and just paint the rest, with some really good caulk around all joints and windows.

One difficulty with stone facing is that unless your tear it out to the studs and redo the sheathing, etc.. it will extend farther out from the front than the framing, and you will have to adapt the roof. An alternative is just to do a decorative stone or brick door surround and stucco the rest, something like pis 1 and 4.

I couldn't tell in the pic, but is it stucco below and siding above? That is probably not how it was originally and it would be good to tear it all out to get down to what it was and restore the curve that probably was there. Don't let a contractor talk you into covering it up--always looks not quite right.

Keep the small light over the door. The temptation is to put something bigger overhead, but that is period perfect. Study period examples by doing an image search for Tudor cottage.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 22, 2013 at 2:19PM
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victorianbungalowranch
Here are some small houses that looks sort of like yours, (top two from England) a Sears house (with chimney) and another that was a gas station!
2 Likes   July 22, 2013 at 2:27PM
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Holly Woodworth
@VictorianBungalow Thanks for jumping in and the feedback you have provided. First the roof is in great condtion on the backside and on the front with exception to the tarps that are covering some pretty serious tree damage from a neighbors tree (hence the reason for this project).

The carriage house is a full 2BR1BA apartment that has been always been a rental. I originally was a tenant in the house and after several years I opted t buy it. Because both have been rental properties for many years there were never updated. I have made changes to the inside of both but have never invested in the exterior and now that the insurance is helping pay for the roof, new wrought iron, paint and awnings I've decided to add some extra money to the kitty to help bring an aged beauty back to life.

I adore the black and white photo with the cat slide roof and was thrilled that you took the time to explain this feature to me and all the additional photos you have provided.

I met with a design and build contractor today and he wants $1,500 just to give me a print out of various designs to think about. That is not in the budget so I've contact a carpenter to see what would be involved in recreating the look in the picture below. (by the way I found this photo thanks to your assistance in identifying my home as a Minimalist Tudor).
   July 22, 2013 at 3:18PM
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libradesigneye
Keep the roof in the gray family so it ties to the carriage house, but head a little deeper to a mid-tone so you have more flexibility on the house colors. What if for budget reasons you use architectural shingle siding on the front A instead of trying to put stone on it at this point. The cost is likely to be about 1/4 - you could paint it an earthy pale stone green and use your $ for the corbel supported awning. Stone greens and cream trim with a sw bees wax front door would be darling. Test a green like http://www.sherwin-williams.com/homeowners/color/find-and-explore-colors/paint-colors-by-family/SW6164-svelte-sage/
trim in a creamy off-whte - like roman column
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 22, 2013 at 3:18PM
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Holly Woodworth
@libradesigneye Thank you for offering some color recommendations, I have a couple of questions if you don't mind. I have been looking at architectural shingles for the roof to give it a bit more of a pop (vs. the current 3 tab), would I use the same singles on the front of the A and just paint them? When you say roman columns are referring to ones like the post immediately above your that are on the green house with the red roof? Would the house color be the same color as the A or would the A be something completely different to create a contrast?
   July 22, 2013 at 3:28PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Victorianbungalow The A is done completely in the same aluminum siding as the rest of the house with the same 3 tab shingles as the roof running along the side. If I did do the face of the A in stucco to replace the aluminum siding how would I be able to regain the catslide look to the roof again? Wouldn't I have to get a curved door if I was to do an arched the stone facing around the door . I did some research online and seems the minimum door price with a curved top was about $2,500 and unfortunately that's not within the current budget.
   July 22, 2013 at 4:08PM
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libradesigneye
Oops - no, face shingles come on siding that does echo roof shingles but not match exactly.Much less expensive than roofing. They are paintable or the high end ones come in std colors in a factory finish. Roman column is a white sherwin williams color recommendation - sorry, that was confusing!

If you could afford stone, that would be a rubble profile and you should key your colors off the stone after you pick it out. You may want to wait until you can afford stone, and use your budget for the awning which they can do in a standing seam copper toned metal.

You could paint the A differently, or leave it the same - since your house is smaller than the massing of the carriage house, and it is all one tone, I think I would stick with all one tone here and let the different textures pick up and read out. You had mentioned green, and I wanted to give you some green options. Trim would be the roman column which is a creamy white. The yellow door is for charm - but if you wanted more subtlety, a dark shade on the svelte sage card would work nicely too.
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 22, 2013 at 4:31PM
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brickln
Yeah Holly, if you're not doing the entire roof you need to match what's on the back.
You spoke before about using Hardy shingles- if you face the A with their staggered ones, it will add charm and contrast for little money. I bet a good handyman could do it. Then you could decide if you want to go that route on the rest of the house with little lost if you change direction. Greens will go well with the gray roof and the brick, as will blues.
3 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 22, 2013 at 5:45PM
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Holly Woodworth
Thanks Brickin & Libradesign for an economy suggestion on how to dress up the A. So here are the two options made by Hardy Plank siding HardieShingle®Half Rounds and HardieShingle® Staggered-Edge Panel.
Since neither of these are natural products they are both monochrome in color. And since the suggestion has been made to keep the A the same color as the house than I should not dwell on a translucent stained cedar look Correct?
3 Likes   July 22, 2013 at 6:23PM
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Holly Woodworth
I found this portico photo with the hardy siding. So on my house would I put this just above the door only or flanking the door as well [houzz=
]
4 Likes   July 22, 2013 at 6:39PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Now you know what it cost for the drawings ? That's what most people charge and up . Take a look at my idea book it's not really for you to get ideas but to show before and after drawings , from landscaping to fireplaces at affordable really affordable prices.Yours would be just 199, change it up to get different looks and color chioces . Look through this site and you will see many of my drawings .. This is for a conceptual drawing ( not a plan ) for the front of the house , with a court yard . We are here to help you houzzers realize your goals . The total value, is all the pro advice your getting coupled with a drawing . You have a team like no one gets in the real market . Imagine the cost to assemble all these pros in a conference room just to give one client advice . Makes me sweat just thinking about the cost but that's what you have here on houzz . Three drawings a day will keep the cost at this level for houzzers, that's my product here on houzz . Keep up the good work you'll get there
   July 22, 2013 at 7:06PM
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brickln
Cedar would be perfect, and if you want to use it to gauge how it would look on other portions of the house like the side ridges, I'd say give it a try if you want. But since the rest of the home would not be clad in wood at this time, I'd go with Hardy or stucco, especially if you think it will be some time before you address the other sides of the house.
As for the portico, yes if the A can support it. I see nothing wrong with painting or staining it a different color.
   July 22, 2013 at 7:07PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin So if I understood you correctly I heard you say that it would be ok to use natural cedar on the top triangle of the photo of the portico above but not on the area underneath flanking the door, for that t I should use the hardy siding or stucco since the rest of the house is not wood. Pardon me for not knowing what side ridges are? (would that be the exterior sides of a full full bump out should I extend the portico all the way down to ground level as in the photo I have just attached [houzz=
]
1 Like   July 22, 2013 at 7:22PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful thanks I'll go check out your ideabook
   July 22, 2013 at 7:23PM
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brickln
No, natural cedar or Hardy on the whole face of the A. Paint or stain in same color as the body of the house or a different one. I'd choose Hardy.
The portico as pictured, low profile and painted to match the trim. I'd go with awning.
Sorry for ridge reference- the sides of your home under the roof peaks, like your exterior photo above.
1 Like   July 22, 2013 at 7:47PM
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victorianbungalowranch
You could do a stone veneer surround on a square door--arched doors were most popular, but I've seen it done on regular doors. This is a traditional cottage design detail in England--quite often done in brick too. Ever see the show Martin on PBS--the houses there are stone with brick edging around windows and doors because it is easier to get a straight edge that way. Then some got stuccoed over with just the brick showing.

Tudor Revival were inspired by the Cotswold Cottages which were typically stucco with stone. If you feel up to doing it, doing the decorative stone effect can be a DIY project, even if you have someone else do the stucco portion. Modern stone veneers are quite nice and not very thick. I would use a limestone type, not one with lots of colors, such as fieldstone. It will be an arts and crafts project to get it just asymmetrical enough to complement the architecture. If you get someone to do it for you, I would supervise closely to ensure the craftsmanship is good.

If you have any computer skills, you might try making your own pics. That canopy you pictured is quite nice, and I provided pics of appropriate small copper awnings. Take some pics of your house from the same angle and cut and paste them in. Then put in the Sherwin Williams or some other paint manufacturer website and make masks (sort of a reverse stencil) of the parts you want to paint, and try stuff out. I think a grey-green-sagey color would be perfect and go well with your brick, with an antique, (just slightly brown or yellow) not bright white, trim, perhaps some reddish brown or wood tone brown or charcoal grey accents, with black railings, maybe gray or tile red on the stoop. Tile red would be too massive I think, but a stenciled tile pattern on the treads and stoop deck might be nice. The white is too stark. If you let a copper hood age to verdigris, then a type of grey, maybe with a hint of green, might be better, or a tan.

I saw that picture too--although the posts look nice on that house, your gable is much steeper and smaller, and I don't think it will work, and will block the stoop. A canopy of some sort would be much nicer, although I think it could look nice without any sort of canopy, and just a door surround. The color is nice.

If you do the canopy with corbel (brackets, no posts), the door surround may be too much. This is a small area, and actually real smooth cut cedar shingles (not the handsplit kind)--I would use random square cut type--would be actually easier to install to fit the angles and curves and look better. Then you can use a transparent or solid stain to contrast with the rest of the house.

I would demo the shingles, siding and sheathing for the "A." You will probably see that it was angled off and can restore it to its original profile. I also think using a more textured roof shingle--maybe the same color but go up to the 50-year architectural shingles, or use real cedar shingles or simulated slate. The actual area is tiny, so you could go with a more expensive material to contrast with the rest, but you must consider the rest of the materials on the house to make sure it will work. Too much of a good thing can look terrible.

If you go with the canopy, be sure to get a good finish carpenter to get the detailing right. And I would match the shingles just on the canopy, not on the A, if I wasn't going to use the existing roof shingles for the whole thing. And if you have a vent, it should be tall and skinny.

Whatever you do, be sure to get a good finish carpenter who knows how to handle something like this. The wood canopy pictured is nicely detailed, but it takes someone who knows his stuff to get the angles, proportions and details right. Might be cheaper in the long run to go with copper--but the one you pictured is too fancy.

I'm tied up with a lot of stuff right now and just do this for fun. My background is historic preservation, so I like to help people with architecturally interesting homes preserve what they got. If I had the time I would do some renderings for you to try out different combinations for you. Everything Beautiful has some good ideas and it takes a bit of imagination to visualize how it will actually look.

I think there are deer-proof landscaping tips on this site, and you can try GardenWeb.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 6:41AM
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libradesigneye
Yes, do not dwell on cedar translucent comment, sorry. Your quantities are going to be small. I'm not a fan of the victorian 1/2 circle curves, love the staggered shingle profile or just get the cost difference from your roofer on how much to install real shingles - since the a is pretty small it might actually be easier to work with the real thing.

I love that cottage portico but also not sure it is right for your style - like simple canvas awning in trim off-white in curved front edge shape - also should fit budget well.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 12:39PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Victorian bungalow I can appreciate the time you have taken to put together all the responses you have provided. I am enjoying everything you have shared including the historical photos and background information and links. In your previous posting you mentioned photos of different awnings that I can cut and paste onto the existing photo of my house but there were no attachments.

I did meet with someone today who does custom carpentry work on high end houses in McLean VA and he felt that the narrow and steepness to the A would not support a proper wood styled canopy with corbels. After reviewing a few of the ideas on this blog he feels strongly that I should invest in a copper awning for over the door and rejected covering the A in Stucco. He said his first choice was to use stone covering the entire A and his second choice was stone below a new copper awning and Cedar above the new copper awning. He did not like he Hardy shingles at all and said I would be better off painting the existing siding on the A the same color as the house with an accent trim before going that route.
   July 23, 2013 at 1:01PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
2 D Drawings before and after's Your getting somewhere Hollywood.
1 Like   July 23, 2013 at 1:28PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Some samples of the 2D process
   July 23, 2013 at 1:32PM
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Holly Woodworth
@libradesign is this the type of canvas awning you had in mind?
1 Like   July 23, 2013 at 1:32PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Samples of the 3D process.
   July 23, 2013 at 1:40PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful. Yes 2D drawings make it very easy to visualize my project. I'm still in the stages of determining the best options that will work within my budget. As much as I love the stone look I may not be able to afford both stone and a copper canopy so it is a bit premature to get drawings before I can determine which route I am taking. I have a sneaky suspicion it is going to come down to either stone and a canvas awning or a copper awning on the original aluminum siding that has been repainted. Keeping fingers crossed and welcoming all thoughts and suggestions.
   July 23, 2013 at 1:43PM
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libradesigneye
Holly - here's a link where they put an eyebrow arch on the top of the awning where it attaches to the house - think that would be terrific - you can stone an arch in and still have a square top door. Ignore the awning fabric but also not a big fan of the scallop bottom edge - think a straight one is better for your style home. http://www.citycanvas.com/images/Gallery/residential%20awnings/peirrier,%20donna%20003.jpg
Stone and canvas would be amazing, shingle and copper neat too. You've got some terrific options.
   July 23, 2013 at 2:31PM
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victorianbungalowranch
I don't know, I think you will have to redo the siding for any kind of canopy to get the flashing and attachment right anyway. It would be a shame to not fix this area back to original profile while you have the chance.

Did he give a reason to nix stucco? The main thing is not to extend beyond the roof drip line, so you must go down to original sheathing--never stucco over old wood siding. It is a relatively small area, so I would think the cost should be reasonable.

They also have "stucco" press wood panels or better yet fiber cement (CertainTeed) that might be an option with some decorative half-timbering or a skim coat. If you use fiber cement, be sure to have an underlayment and a small air gap behind. Did your guy discuss that option? It would be quite cost-effective, and then you could afford a small copper awning. The space you have is so small that joints won't be that noticeable.
http://sidingmagazine.com/what-is-it/fiber-cement-panel-siding/ http://sidingmagazine.com/siding-comparison/fiber-cement-siding-review-of-4-top-brands/ http://sidingmagazine.com/siding-information/the-benefits-of-faux-siding-panels/

There is also faux stone panels, which look much better than they used to, but still kind of have a fake appearance. I would choose carefully for that though, and think the stucco is the better option.

Board and Batten may be an option too, although not my top choice.

I included pics of doors with original copper hoods in my first post. They were allowed to weather to a natural green verdigris finish. Here are some awning ideas:
Private Residence II (canvas)
Art Gallery Addition (wood--simple may be better)

Custom or prefabricated metal hood:
Wright Street Home
porch (copper)
studiobfg.com (copper or metal)
Knowlton House

Here are some metal options that look like they use metal roofing, not a prefabricated hood:
Park Residence (metal)
Albans Road Residence (wood and metal)
Hill Country Arts and Crafts
New entry way

I rather like the awning with arrows
Source: http://www.generalawnings.com/door-awnings-c-80/designer-window-or-door-awning-p-260 Start at about $200

The simple wood canopy:
Source: six page drawing set of this canopy is available for $75.00.
Write Office@ericstengelarchitecture.com

The small copper awnings
Source:http://www.crescentcitycopper.com/copper-awnings price: $600-$1200 (most around $800)

I really think the right awning will make the façade! and the copper ones are worth the investment--last much longer than canvas, and probably ultimately cheaper than a site-built one when you take labor into account.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 3:23PM
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brickln
Holly, just thinking another way you can incorporate stone in your entry is to re-surface the patio.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 5:29PM
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victorianbungalowranch
Wow, I found this photo=very grand, but you see how the stucco, grey trim and brick is combined, and trellis with some climbing vines (not ivy! horrible for your siding) and a similar color combination could look great.
Windsor Companies 1
Windsor Companies 2
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 8:07PM
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Holly Woodworth
Good Evening Victorian Bungalow I have had a delightful evening searching through and researching your latest post. I think I have nailed down the awning decision to definitely going with Copper now to decide on the suited shape/style.

In addition to completely going through roughly the first 5-10 pages each on Google, Yahoo and Bing looking up "Copper Awnings" I probably have he most complete selection of web pages for copper awnings. I would be happy to post the list of vendors here if the rest of you are interested in having access to this information as a future resource.

I believe the contractor nixed the stucco because he personally could not see the vision. He just said to me that it would look bad. I have a few more questions on this subject but will follow up tomorrow
   July 23, 2013 at 8:32PM
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libradesigneye
Holly - you don't have to pay for actual copper. You can get a standing seam metal in a copper finish ( a finish that will always look copper, where a more expensive copper will patina - lovely in its own way but not worth the extra expense of real copper when the look you want is copper polish)

I'm going to share my thoughts as a contractor with you - if you go for the metal awning, just wait and do stone later when the budget allows.

Stucco is a significant expense here - you could spend less for a full masonry layer with stucco parged on top I'm betting. They have to do a lot of demo to make stucco work - rework the drip edge on the roof, and I'm close to agreeing with the contractor that it may not give you the look you want. Most contractors standardly do a kind of rough finish too, and you would probably prefer a steel troweled, overworked european finish that is very smooth but cracks out. You also get into what kind of color coat do you want - stucco looks bad in colors that siding looks good in - like green which is what you want. Stucco colors are more limited than cottage tones - you can paint it, but it still doesn't really have the same flexibility. You could go creamy off-white and probably be okay with it forever as contrast against your siding but consider the whole look carefully so you know what you want / are asking for.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 10:31PM
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victorianbungalowranch
I couldn't resist and tried to do some pics--the color in the software I use isn't that good, but it will give you an idea with a brick surround sort of like the pics above. I added a bit of color to the back building as well. Your brick is less orange, so adjust accordingly.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 23, 2013 at 10:32PM
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When your ready to put it altogether let me know .
   July 23, 2013 at 11:07PM
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brickln
The French Revival on this page shows a home similar to yours with the A in stucco, rest of the house in shingles.
http://historicridgewood.tripod.com/architectural_variety.htm
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 24, 2013 at 3:08PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
I just had to clean up the front Holly.
3 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 24, 2013 at 4:59PM
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Holly Woodworth
@libradesign Thanks in regards to your post of going metal vs copper most of the resellers I have found online are only marking down the price by 10% to have painted metal vs copper I think given the small difference I would be more inclined to go with the copper for the resale value. I've been able to find a 60" awning shipped to VA for as low as $1700-$1800. There are two basic styles I am trying to choose between the concave and the straight edge. I can see the difference but am unable to determine which style would accent the house best.
   July 24, 2013 at 5:38PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Victorian bungalow wow thanks for the suggestion and visual for the brick door surround. I have been pleasantly surprised that I do like the simplicity of the look and never in a million years would I have thought that would have looked nice as a possibility.

Certainly a less expensive idea than going full stone and even though it is not as grand it certainly bears looking more into in conjunction with stucco.

So as I looked up each link you provided I noticed that some pointed to stucco siding and others to full stucco sheets much like drywall (those have to be installed with he half timbering to cover the seems). So would it be as simple to install as setting the bricks around the door, and than install the full stucco sheets directy to the A flash the edges and than stucco over the top of the sheets up to the bricks?
   July 24, 2013 at 5:49PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin All of you guys are a treasure trove of information. What a surprise that you actually found a photo with the stucco front including copper awning, and I think by looking at the photo you answered my previous question of which awning to use. Also do you have any feedback on the name of the black wrought iron design underneath the windows? Any thoughts as to how something like this would look under my small left window? Or am I missing the point again by trying to do/add/ consider to much?
   July 24, 2013 at 5:53PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything Beautiful I am delighted you are here contributing. As you can tell from my questions I am still undecided as to the correct direction of materials and oh if I could only afford to do the whole house in stone as in you latest picture
   July 24, 2013 at 5:55PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin I did get a quote of $4,500 to do the patio in flagstone and yes that would be my preferred option since I love love love the look. However one contractor made a good point that you cannot see the base of the patio from the street but you can see the A and I should focus my immediate dollars on the front vs the patio. As you can see no matter what it needs to be painted and I will never do it white again as it just showcased the dirt vs the befit of bringing brightness to the porch.
   July 24, 2013 at 5:58PM
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brickln
If you're keeping the wrought iron fence, it would be a nice feature on the house. I'd probably go with a style that doesn't protrude so much since the window is so close to the A. The iron contractor could give you some ideas I'm sure.
As for the awning, I think a concave one that gets narrower up top is less weighty and will look better since you have such a sharp peak. Big investment there- it will be beautiful.
I like the patio as is with those sweet curved stairs, it will look great wen all is done.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 24, 2013 at 6:46PM
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victorianbungalowranch
I think 60 inches is a bit wide for your house--is that the top or the bottom?. If bottom, then that should be OK--that should be just over a foot extra on each side of the door. Please measure the top and the bottom of the flare--and the space you have on the house. And you need room for the light fixture, so I would mount it a bit higher than you pictured. You don't want it to go all the way to the edge though.

The stucco area is so small that I don't know if you will be saving much money using the panels--same thing, different terminology. If you go half-timbered, it should be somewhat less. The "brick" in the surround could be a veneer type--they come as singles and in sheets. and the stucco panels can be cut to fit around them and skim coated--sort of like you would do with a bathroom. Brick veneer sheets don't have the variation of hand-set.

If you use stone, set the top in a shallow arch with a keystone or have a solid lintel or it won't look right. You could use caste stone (concrete) for this. The brick can be straight in a soldier's course (set vertically).

There is also a technique known as mortar washing in which the surface is lightly stuccoed with a bit of the brick showing through. It can just look a bit bumpy or like whitewashed brick. It might be possible to use full thickness brick around the door surround and the veneer sheets around that and stucco over the veneer, but that may be more expensive.

I would talk to an expert to decide which route you want to go. When it comes to masonry, it really pays to get someone with experience and good craftsmanship.

I personally would like the look of clay tile on your stoop and steps, but not sure if the climate is good for that. Stenciling would be an affordable option--use a sponge to vary the color and make the base color grey, not white, to reduce the contrast and busyness.

This is a modest house and you wouldn't want to dress it up too much, and there is the side entrance to think about. I do think an enclosure of the trash cans would be a good idea. I also thought about a curved railing in front, but the spacing would have to be right. Maybe a more fence-like railing would work, with little arrows on top. It would be a bit more substantial than typical railings, which seem to rust out easily.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 25, 2013 at 6:34AM
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victorianbungalowranch
BTW, how large is the existing awning? That one is much too large. It is very important to measure and draw it to scale, rather than just eyeballing it with a couple of measurements, to make sure it fits properly. The spacing is really tight, and even just a few inches could make a difference.
   July 25, 2013 at 11:59AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Victorianbungalow The measurement on the current awning is 71". I have copied all of your comments on the stucco and sent them in an email to the contractor that will be providing me a bid for the whole job (less the flagstone on the patio).
   July 25, 2013 at 5:54PM
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Holly Woodworth
Here are some photos for the awning I am considering. I am a bit concerned that the this company doesn't include a fully welded aluminum frame for mounting it on the house? In additional discussions with the manufacturer, I mentioned that I would love to install stone onto the A and they recommended I install the awning before the stone. Has anyone ever heard of this before? Don't you risk getting mortar or possibly dropping something on the beautiful new copper? I was also told not to allow any other metals touch the copper as it would create a negative reaction between the two metals and that I should purchase a copper channel to mount the awning onto.
   July 25, 2013 at 6:05PM
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lucindalane
I'm intrigued with your charming little cottage, too. Everyone has given you such great ideas. I've found a couple of examples, but, unfortunately, I don't have any way to embed them, so I'm just going to post the links. Both of them have brick or stone surrounding the door, and one of them has a small rectangular window similar to yours, except it is just one solitary pane.
http://0.tqn.com/d/create/1/0/_/R/L/-/Sears-Mansfield-1929-Honor-Bilt.jpg http://0.tqn.com/d/create/1/0/Z/R/L/-/Chatsworth-Summer.jpg

Also, a really unusual tudor style, with a green half-timbers! http://0.tqn.com/d/architecture/1/0/5/i/cotswold002edit.jpg
Here's one with curved steps, and a unusual walkway. Also, I think that its a cool idea that these smaller windows have the diamond windowpane look. http://www.bhg.com/home-improvement/exteriors/curb-appeal/cottage-style-home-ideas/#page=2
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 25, 2013 at 7:48PM
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Holly Woodworth
@lucindalane Thanks or joining us. There are a great group of people here who have selflessly contributed their time talents and expertise toward helping me with ideas for sprucing up my home. The photos you contributed are both great examples and if you have the time look back through some of the previous post by Victorian Bungalow as she has a tremendous amount of knowledge of these types of houses. I learned that the beautiful roofline is called a cat slide and I'm hoping that when I have the roof redone that the plywood underneath will still be able to accommodate what the original architecture was meant to be.
   July 25, 2013 at 7:59PM
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brickln
Holly, he just wants to sell his product. The awning will be removed and replaced when you re-face the A, so you'll have higher labor costs on that project.
Although a copper one is the ultimate accessory for your home, I'd go with one you can live with at what, 20-25% of the cost, until you can replace the aluminum siding. That way you'll be more sure you've made the correct decision on the awning size and shape before you make the investment.
And if the roofer can extend the roofline on the A to give you the covered entry you want, maybe that's all you need and the money can be spent on other things you want like a decorative window.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 26, 2013 at 3:18AM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin Super answer thanks. Even though I got a good price for this awning I believe I may need to keep searching for someone who sells the awning with a frame included. This manufacturer gave me the instructions that the awning is to be installed using the copper flanges. There would be no way to accomplish that if there is an uneven surface such as stone.
   July 26, 2013 at 7:30AM
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victorianbungalowranch
I don't think it will look right for the eaves of the A to be extended very much, especially enough to shelter the entry. Houses of this period had virtually no overhang and the steepness of the pitch would look odd--not like a porch or awning at all.

I would trust the manufacturer on installation and it is true that the mount should be the same metal or you get a type of corrosion called galvanic reaction--essentially an small electric current where the dissimilar metals meet. The fasteners should be inert too. Once you decide on the "A" veneer treatment, consult with them on the exact directions on how to mount properly to ensure proper water drainage.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 26, 2013 at 7:35AM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin I have been told by two different contractors that the labor involved to stick build a roof would exceed the cost to install copper. So that was when I started intensely focusing on looking for a reasonable priced awning. I know that canvas has been thrown out here as an option but in addition for wanting the awning for ascetics I also enjoy the cover I get from rain when exiting and entering the house
   July 26, 2013 at 7:36AM
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PRO
Studio M Interior Design
Go with a green main exterior color, with white trim and maybe black lacquer front door color (polished brass hardware would go great!) and either black shutters or awning to replace the current ones. Cute bones!
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 26, 2013 at 7:43AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Studio M Thanks so much for the input. Currently I have a full glass front door and love the light it brings into the front of the house. I don't really want to paint the wood door black so would you recommend painting the storm door black?
1 Like   July 26, 2013 at 7:54AM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Ok this is really getting interesting .What do you guys want to see on the house that I can produce ,that fits Hollywood's budget ? Hi Holly W. Would clapboard siding work or is it stucco? black shutter or no shutters ? I am in. Are we still not sure of color or is that settled ? It's easy for us to put things together but the hard part is fitting all Holly's wish list within her budget. we'll do a few more drawings if they help. I can put in a flat canvas awning.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 26, 2013 at 3:17PM
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brickln
Love the door, love the hardware.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 26, 2013 at 4:07PM
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lucindalane
Thanks, Holly. I'm happy to have found this great discussion concerning your lovely abode. :)
Your door looks very Craftsman, to me, but that style is a kissing cousin to the Tudor one because of the huge timber supports and brackets-so it looks nice, IMO. I think the copper awning looks great, although I don't understand why, unless I'm mistaken, you were told that it wasn't feasible to do a modest wooden portico supported by substantial brackets that matched the roofline of the "A." I'm not an expert, though I've done some minor carpentry work that I learned from my dad over the years, but it seems that copper-even just sheets of it-would be at least somewhat heavy, if the concern is that the "A" feature isn't substantial enough to bear some weight.
I have some thoughts on the carriage house. To give it a more "Tudor-ish" look, you could make the garage doors two toned by emphasizing the paneled look with a darker color. Also, I was wondering, do you need all those gutters across the front? Would it be possible to just run one under the front eave all the way to the left side, and have a larger gutter on the left side of the structure, on the corner, instead of on the left side of the front? I was thinking that it would also add to the Tudor look if you could place three large timber brackets under the eaves where the gutters are now there on the front. You could then paint the trim around the windows the same color as the panels on the garage doors to help them stand out and accentuate the Tudor-type style.
I was also wondering if the trim on the "A" was wood, or is it aluminum? If its wood, it could be stripped down, and you could stain it to match the wood on your front door, which would also make it more "Tudor-y."
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 10:48AM
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brickln



Colors, narrow shutters, sweet little wrought iron brackets...
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 11:23AM
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lucindalane
Great photo, bricklin. It's really nifty how they made the gutters blend into the decor, and those iron brackets and shutters are interesting.
   July 27, 2013 at 12:32PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything Beautiful thank you for your offer of generosity to contribute your artistic talents toward the cause. I know that you are here to help support your household with graphics services and you have been with us as we move forward in fine tuning and trouble shooting the many ideas that everyone has brought forward
   July 27, 2013 at 1:09PM
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brickln
I wouldn't necessarily use the elements in the same way, but they seem delicate enough for this home and show that wrought iron can be incorporated if Holly plans to keep the front railings.
   July 27, 2013 at 1:18PM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin Here is a close up of the door hardware
1 Like   July 27, 2013 at 1:29PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ lucindalane You have great observation skills, I have lived here for some time and never paid much attention to the gutters on the front of the carriage house (from this point forever I will notice them lol). Each of the 3 downspouts empties into their own buried drain, and unfortunately I don't have access to a backhoe to relocate the drains so I believe I am stuck with them where they are.

I loved the ideas I've received on this blog about possibly extending the A to create it's own covered full length portico but neither of the contractors I spoke with seemed interested in taking on that project except the one design build firm who wanted a $1,500 retainer before even beginning to help me. So fromall the feedback I've received here, Copper has come in as my first choice and the consensus is that Canvas with Spear supporting the awning is the second..

I've included a close up of the garage door for clarification. i heard you say that you are recommending painting each of the panels dark but leaving the remainder of the door white (Is that correct?) Would you also leave the carriage house white or should it be painted the same main color as the house?

The siding on the A is the same Aluminum siding as the rest of the house.
   July 27, 2013 at 2:15PM
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brickln
It's aged beautifully, Holly. All these little details are what make a home special and give us clues as to where we should go with new additions. I look forward to seeing it all come together.
1 Like   July 27, 2013 at 2:29PM
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houssaon
Holly, I really like the concave copper awning you are looking at and suggest you forget about the suggestion of extending the A frame for make an over-hang for all the reasons you have reported. I like the black wrought iron supports that echo your railing:


Love your front door and the hardware. If the door needs it, it can be refinished and protected with a finish coat like polyurethane.
4 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 2:41PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Brickin Thanks for finding the Buckhead photo. Love the portico on this house (wish I could incorporate it into my design) and the colors are also nice, however the grids on the window in the photo are dark and I believe I may need to go with something white to be consistent with the front of the carriage house (or do I?).

The thin plank shutters would be just perfect for the small frame of my house since these are of a more narrow profile. Should I put the shutters on both of the windows or just the one on the right as in the photos submitted by Everything Beautiful?

Yes I am planning on replacing the wrought iron railing on the porch and I found a company who will sell me these beautiful scrolls for $10/a piece to seriously dress the look up.

I liked the wrought iron scrolls under the eves in your photo (is there a specific name for this design feature)?
And somewhere in the back of my mind the thought came up to put snow guards on the roof for decoration; am I just asking for trouble by making such a simplistic house to busy?

[houzz=
]
   July 27, 2013 at 2:58PM
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houssaon
Love the scrolls. I don't think I have ever seen snow guards on a asphalt roof. I would not spend any money adding them. Slate makes the snow colder so it tends to freeze and then when the temperature rises a whole sheet of frozen snow can come down at once.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 3:23PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ houssaon Yes I definitely would like to have the decorative wrought iron scrolls attached underneath the copper awning on the front of the house and I think they will go nicely with the wrought iron railings

Thanks for the feedback regarding the roof Ice shields nix to those. And I'll try to see what I can find in regards to Black iron supports in the Buckhead photo.
   July 27, 2013 at 3:40PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Victorian bungalow I was looking over the photos you made of the brick on the front of the stucco and noticed that when you put color on the carriage house you split the upper and lower sections with a white panel between. I love the look and the visually break it creates.
   July 27, 2013 at 3:54PM
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Holly Woodworth
UPDATE UPDATE UPDATE!!

I found a contractor who will include the stone on the front of the A within my budget. So now that I know it's a definite possibility, the next step is stone type, sizes, color, grout color etc. (Remember my favorite color is Green)

Need Awning Size Recommendation: My current aluminum door awning depth is 52" (projecting from front of house out). With all of the research I have been doing on the web I am finding copper awnings in depths of 18" 24" and 32". My front door is 32" and I am used to having the front door completely covered by the awning as I enter into and exit the house. All of the awning people say they can customize. Should I consider anything any deeper? Likewise I am finding that the different awnings vary in height. Here are a couple examples of different looks and heights (of course whatever I do will have to be tapered to fit within the A on the top side of the awning. What do you all think of this 3rd style for the house (with the Arch) if I can get it to fit within the top of the A by extending the height and tapering the top in much like the other awnings. (entirely unique)?
   July 27, 2013 at 4:09PM
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brickln
Hoorah!!
I like the seams in the top one, but an arch and a cat slide roof go hand in hand, so if you can get that feature in, all the better.
Whatever you use for stone will have to look good up at the thinnest section of the peak, and should be as flat as possible, I think, to aid the awning installation.
   July 27, 2013 at 5:07PM
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lucindalane
Holly, I'd paint the carriage house the same as the main house. On the garage door, I'd paint the panels/squares the same color as the house, as well as the trim around and between the little window panes. The rest I'd paint a darker color, but in the same color family.
I understand about the gutters. Each one having its own draining system certainly took some forethought, and I know that the whole idea is to keep water from damaging the foundation. So, "don't mess with success" certainly applies here. I would, though, paint the gutters the same shade as the house, like they are now. I still think you could add some timber brackets close to each corner of the house-I think you could still make it look balanced even thought the gutters aren't exactly balanced on the front. Another idea is to place two timber frames on either side of the dormer looking windows; I think that would be a nice feature. I think some kind of timber feature would look nice on the carriage house-and, as mentioned, pant the window trim the same dark color that's on the garage doors.
   July 27, 2013 at 5:39PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ brickin I also have been talking with different awning manufacturers and one website even has installation instructions online. So far it seems the awning installation is to secure the copper flanges directly to the house prior to the stone being applied. To me that sound really awkward trying to install the stones around and over the awning, but I can't really think of any other way to get a proper water seal. My concern would be what happens if you ever need to replace the awning? It would be permanently attached under the stone!! Yikes

So If I understood you correctly, your recommendation is that I should see if they will make a copper awning with more of a fluted or a extended seam using the arch as the shape/model, is that correct? What is your recommendation on depth? As noted in the 3rd photo it does have quite a large square trim to it which will appear on the sides as quite boxy?. The first photo has a lower bottom trim profile and is more in line with the traditional concave/bell shaped awning. However since my house is not traditional, I feel I can get away with more.
   July 27, 2013 at 5:55PM
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Holly Woodworth
Now that things are coming together I am going to rely on the collection of your expertise before pulling the triger and signing the contract with the contractor.

So the subject of this entry is Gable Vent Louver. So far we know improvements will include:

1: Stone Front on A (examples still needed to determine size style of stone)
2: Copper Awning (style still unknown)
3 Should we also include an appropriate sized copper Gable Vent above the awning at the top of the peak? If so do you prefer shape of photo1 or photo 2 better?
I've reattached the original photo of the front of the house for ease of visualization.
FYI there would be no real functional value from adding this, it would only be for curb appeal.

Thanks all.
   July 27, 2013 at 7:34PM
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Holly Woodworth
Questions on Lighting for under Awning. Here is a photo of my existing porch light. Looks great installed next to the door but may lose it's charm if installed above the door as your eye may possibly be focusing on the light bulb on the underside vs. the full fixture. I would appreciate your input on this existing fixture (which I really do love) or do I need to invest in something else. Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
   July 27, 2013 at 7:44PM
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brickln
Holly, the light needs to stay. Install it at the back door or inside your entry in lieu of the table lamp if you can't make it work up front. It's too precious to go away.

As for the awning- it's permanent, and will be difficult if not impossible to remove without causing damage! And you're going custom, sight unseen, no returns. For me, that would be scary stuff. I'd be making one out of cardboard to see how it fits!

As for size, it's been a long time since I've dealt with awnings, and it wasn't copper. I think it's door width plus trim plus 3" for each side. It's your umbrella and it's custom, so you get to choose the depth, I guess! I'm assuming it shouldn't be more than half the width, but that might just be for round ones. Yes, option three is a bit boxy. Especially since you're losing wall space as you go up, having the copper closer to the wall is sleeker and helps with scale.

Peek detail is nice, but with copper, do you really need an extra detail?
   July 27, 2013 at 8:47PM
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Holly Woodworth
Yet another set of design questions: It was mentioned in one of the earlier posts that I should consider using something called Rubble Stone on the Face of the A. I do intend on using Natural Stone but for the purpose of supplying photos for examples on this blog, I have copied photos of cultured stone panels. Should I go with random or a more structured look?
   July 27, 2013 at 8:48PM
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lucindalane
I'm very excited for you with all the neat changes you are going to be able to make.
I like the third copper awning, as well as the second one. I understand that it can't be too wide, but you also are wanting it for shelter in bad weather. So, if its custom, could they possibly combine the two style somehow, and give you the width at the bottom while keeping it narrow at the top?
I like the "skinny" vent, personally, but the rectangular one would fit in with the two lower windows' shape.
Concerning the stone, I think that the smaller, structured would look great. The larger one, IMO, would overpower all the other features on the "A."
As for the light fixture, any light that you put above the door, of course, will only have the "guts" visible from underneath it. I also think you should keep it, like brickln said, but you might find, after you make all these changes, that its smaller size might cause it to get lost among the other features-so you probably will need one that's bit larger so it's presence is apparent during the day and against all the new stuff.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 9:18PM
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lucindalane
I thought it might be nice to see a photo of an original Tudor cottage. I found one that still has much of its original structure, dating from 1590! It even has the original water well in the yard-though its just ornamental now, of course. http://www.zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/details/16471307?utm_source=nest&utm_medium=feeds
I realize that this is an American style where they just incorporated some features from the original English style building, but it's still fascinating, IMO, to see how everything has "morphed" over time.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 9:26PM
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houssaon
As far as whether to go with random (round) or a more structured (rectangle) look, here are some photos for inspiration that I found searching "storybook" in the Houzz exterior section. (Lots more http://www.houzz.com/photos/exterior/%22storybook%22-)

Would you consider this stone structured? 2011 Parade Home. I don't like it at all. This is OK: Preston Hollow_Traditional. This is better: The Gatehouse

Random: exterior Notice the dove cote feature, you could go for that instead of the non-functional vent. Pretty colors on this random version: Idaho Retreat - Gate House. Vote no for this look: Attic Conversion to Bedroom. I really like these colors, especially if you go with a gray roof: The Rivendell Manor. This a thin veneer: Thatched Roof Home in MA Featuring Boston Blend Round Thin Veneer Siding. Does this remind you of something: needham studio - dphj.01 ? Good greens on this property: Eclectic Modern Tudor Exterior. Roof could be a light gray.

One aspect that makes the stone work is that the color of the grout should blend with the color of the stone.

I love your light fixture. I have a hand made one next to my back door that is original to my 1935 house. It makes me think about the people who built the home. I think yours is the right size for the A, so I would keep it right where it is. I think we tend to over-size light fixtures now, but I would rather have this piece of history stay.

Regarding the depth of the copper portico, I have a gable pergola at my back door and covered a section right by the door with a clear plastic corrugated material, so I wouldn't get wet or have snow pile up right at the door. It is about 36 inches deep and does the job quite well.
   July 27, 2013 at 11:26PM
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houssaon
Holly, This might be the product you are looking for:
I like the tight joints. It might make installation easier.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 27, 2013 at 11:56PM
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brickln
I love the stone, but I'm thinking a veneer treatment with irregular slate tiles would be lighter on the structure and easier to work around the sharp angles. Try to get a good mix of colors in case you want a change down the line.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 28, 2013 at 6:30AM
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PRO
Susan Harter Muralpapers
My grandma had this house, or one very much like it, built in the 1930s. She and Grandpa built it themselves. I'd shy away from the stone suggestions entirely. They had little money, but made the place utterly charming.
They used cedar singles with a natural dark brown stain, yellow trim, deep green shutters and curved, wooden door. It was like a storybook cottage.Two pollarded mulberry trees out front like giant mushrooms. Roses, peonies, lilacs, pinks, and snapdragons flooded the gardens, the lawn was velvety grass studded with white and purple violets.
Is it possible you have a curved door under the siding? If not I love the curved wooden awning idea. Or perhaps a curved fanlight over the existing door? A small round window in that tall gable might also break up the peak nicely.
Shutters would help a lot to widen the existing windows. Grandma had cheerful wooden window boxes spanning with of window and shutters, brimming over with seasonal displays of flowers, and low horizontal hedges across the width of the house, breaking up the verticality of it all.
You shouldn't have have to break the bank on this one...paint, shutters, new cedar or shake style siding on the front if you can swing it, a couple of small windows, and lots of nice plantings would work wonders. Losing the iron railing out front would help, too.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 28, 2013 at 6:51AM
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lucindalane
Here's a photo of an absolutely original Tudor cottage built 600 years ago, according to the site. If you have probably somewhere around $300,000(I'm estimating totally what it would translate into dollars from pounds)it can be yours.
It's amazing to see all those old timbers and plaster walls with modern furnishings. This is a true cottage, though its really not extremely detailed. http://www.needaproperty.com/property/for-sale/Stowmarket-IP145PP/3-Bedroom-Cottage-House-2994653
If you want to see something that's got details galore, check this out-also an original Tudor, though its really an estate-and it sits right on the Thames River! Check out the barrel-shaped chimney. http://lc.zoocdn.com/ab43c2aff32b24a75112bb07d4116a488c6871c1.jpg
Love the main entry http://lc.zoocdn.com/1312d6c142ce9f6999ccbd6743dc456164b11e97.jpg
This is all I'll post, because I don't meant get too far off of the topic, but I believe these photos show some interesting features of the style
   July 28, 2013 at 2:12PM
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lucindalane
Interesting color scheme on a Tudor-type house. Also, note the window on the far right that looks rather like the window treatment on your garage.
Bloomington Residence 1
I think this brick style looks very nice.
Bloomington Residence 2
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 30, 2013 at 5:42AM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin I'm making a trip tomorrow to go to a stone yard that sells both stone and veneer. You mentioned slate tiles for the front. I'm not sure I know what that look is? Would you mind dropping an example please.
   July 30, 2013 at 4:18PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Susan Thanks for the ideas. Your grandparents house sounds charming and you have given me yet more ideas on moving forward with planting etc. I am planning on putting shutters on the right window but have yet to decide if I should on the left window also (they would have to be less than 10" inches as that is all the space I have between the right side of the window and the A). I think a decorative flower box under he left window would be attractive because the window is smaller than the right one but in reality it would not be functional as there are stairs below it would prevent access for plantings and watering. Any suggestions?
   July 30, 2013 at 4:47PM
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Holly Woodworth
@lucindalane The tudor accents above the window that are similiar to my garage windows are really cool (thanks for the decorating idea). I like it and believe it could really accent the character of the garage. I was not planning on going with the Board and Batten look on the house rather putting stone on the A. How do you feel about dressing up the garage with tudor and the house with paint and stone. The obvious way to tie the two together would be to dress up my A with Board and Batten but that's was never my first choice (either stone or cedar shingles was what I had in my mind's eye
   July 30, 2013 at 5:08PM
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brickln
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 30, 2013 at 5:31PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Brickin ok thanks slate= Hardy Plank
   July 30, 2013 at 6:25PM
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brickln
No- the slate surrounding the first floor entry is slate, Holly. Hardy plank or shingle is above.
http://store.stoneyard.com/categories/Thin-Stone-Veneer/Stone-Veneer-Shapes/Mosaic-Thin-Veneer/?sort=featured
   July 30, 2013 at 6:43PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Brickin Perfect I understand now!! thanks for the clarification. I do love the slate look (if I did use this product, do you think that I would use the exact same product on the porch flooring to match? I've been looking at the example you provided. I think this is a really good option than you
   July 30, 2013 at 7:55PM
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lucindalane
Holly, I think that it would really add to the garage to add the Tudor accents. I believe that you should paint the garage the same color or colors as your house, as they would certainly help to "match" them. If anyone knows anything about the Tudor types of style, I am sure they will see the over all style of both structures without you having the timber-type Tudor accents on the house.
   July 30, 2013 at 8:08PM
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Holly Woodworth
@lucindalane In Addition to matching the color to the house is there any other areas other than above the front windows on the carriage house that I should consider dressing up with the Board and Batten look. Here is a photo of the side profile of the carriage house
   July 30, 2013 at 8:15PM
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lucindalane
You could extend that piece of timber out from the pergola looking item over that porch all the way across, and then do just two of the timber pieces kind of fanning out from there, if you wanted to. You could also just do a couple of those braces under the eaves there by the vent, to give the side a little Tudor flavor.
Did you ever decide what colors were going on the house?

I think I'm getting addicted to these pictures-they are just so cool.
Here is one that shows how a garage door would look painted in the two-tone manner. It also shows the timber treatment on some pretty large gables, like the sides of your garage.

   July 30, 2013 at 9:51PM
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brickln
No- one place or the other. I'd choose the patio.
   July 31, 2013 at 1:45AM
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Holly Woodworth
@lucindalane Thanks for the tudor ideas for the garage. I have not decided my paint colors yet. I have gotten lots of ideas for design options but very few suggestions for colors. My contractor just left for vacation for 10 days and when he gets back he is expecting to begin and I still have to finalize the awning, stone face for the A and colors. Needless to say this is overwhelming as I know I've only got one shot to get it right or I am facing a very expensive mistake. Thanks for participating and suggesting ideas.
   July 31, 2013 at 8:36AM
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lucindalane
You're very welcome. In our modern age, you can now use non-traditional colors on Tudor styles-though I can't say that I've ever seen one painted in bright "neon" colors-though there probably is one out there somewhere. That one with the green timbers is just about the brightest one I've seen, personally, but I thought it really made the house stand out, yet it still coordinated perfectly with the other textures and colors on the house. When you pick out the type of stone that you are going to use, then you will have that as a reference point.
I think that you are making careful choices. Obviously, one never knows until one sees the result, but you are very wise to not make any rash judgements/decisions since it is something that is a substantial expense for you.
There was a thread that I commented on a while back where the OP asked if one had to use traditional colors on a Tudor home, and I remember that I found an example out here where the owner had used shades of blue for the house and the timbers-subtle colors-and it looked very nice. I noted that example I gave earlier where the shutters are actually a shade of turquoise, and I thought it made the house look interesting, and in very good way.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    July 31, 2013 at 6:47PM
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Holly Woodworth
STONE UPDATE: PLEASE PLEASE JUMP IN and give your opinion. So I went to the stone yard today and viewed the choices that my contractor is allowing me to choose between. I don't think Allmeri is going to be one of the available options so that being said what do you all think? Any votes for Chocolate Gray? http://www.sislersstone.com/page/products/natural_stone/thin_veneer.php
   July 31, 2013 at 6:51PM
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brickln
Choc gray
1 Like   August 1, 2013 at 1:06AM
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lucindalane
I agree, Chocolate Gray looks the best. It should allow you all sorts of coordinating color choices.
1 Like   August 1, 2013 at 4:31AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Chocolate Gray. It looks really nice. Gives the home what it needs, brings it to life . Almost there Hollywood, Proud of you for doing your home work .
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 1, 2013 at 8:48AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everyting Beautiful You've given the house yet another completely different look by putting the stone on the house vs. on the A. Surprising, I like the look; actually even better than just on the A but unfortunately I don't think my budget is going to allow me to modify both so I think I have to choose between dressing up the face or the A. I have noticed that you only have shutters on the right window. I did find some 10 in shutters that would fit on the left side but... I can't tell from the photo if you have put some sort of an awning over the left window or if it is just trim.
   August 1, 2013 at 4:13PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
No awning just dental molding . The wood is reclaimed barn wood gives it character and is probably cheaper than stone . No shutters on the small window did not know if you wanted them there.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 1, 2013 at 4:44PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
With shutters on both sides and a patio I built a about a month ago.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 1, 2013 at 5:06PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything it must be fun to be not only an artist but as a contractor to also be able to see your creations come to life. The stone patio would look awesome at the cottage. Wanna make a trip to VA? lol Thanks for putting the second shutter on the left window. I think I have to agree with you that it looks better without possible with a nice wrought iron planter box below for accents.
   August 1, 2013 at 5:33PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Don't rush into anything take all the time you need Hollywood.
   August 4, 2013 at 10:39AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Shutters aren't common on Tudor Revival houses and tend to be used as an accent on only a window. I agree if you are going to use them, it would look best on the left window only and a window box on the little window, or possibly a decorative metal grill. Fake shutter dogs can complete the look, and make sure they are sized to fit over the window, and mounted very close to the sash.

I do like the concave design without the arch, and I think 60 inches wide might be a bit big proportionally. Note how the examples Houssaon and I posted and drawn by Everything Beautiful were barely wider than the door. I think the idea of a cardboard mock up for scale is and excellent idea--doesn't have to be too fancy--just a shed type angle would give you an idea, and if custom, the canopy can be any width or depth. Having it too deep will make it look out of scale as well. It will be much smaller than what you are used to unfortunately.

Also, I would consider what is happening to the side of the house, and to the steps. You have a lot of brick there, so perhaps clay tile would be appropriate for the patio and steps, or a stenciled version. If you took another picture of your house from the left corner showing the side and the front, and without the awnings, it would help visualize what the entire house would look like with the changes. If you are feeling brave, you can peel back the aluminum on the A to see what's underneath. You might be pleasantly surprised.

I don't think the Carriage House has to match--just harmonize. I think a grey or brown would look nice on it with white trim. The white band I put on it was to indicate the pergola across the top, although it might be possible to have a painted beltline. Unfortunately it was sided without window casings, which limits your options to bring out more character.

If you wanted to reside the garage, board and batten on top, possibly with shaped bottom slats, overhanging narrow clapboard or stucco could look nice, and window casings. You could insulate the second floor to add a bit of depth over the bottom. But since the siding is in decent shape, I think some sort of paint job could go a long way. I would also stain the presshre-treated wood of the side porch--you can buy opaque stains and I think white to go with the stairs would look nice if the siding was a darker color, perhaps with a brown or grey for the floorboards and steps.

Not sure about picking out the detail in the garage doors--can look very fakey. I prefer that sort of thing done with lower contrast colors, such as grey and white, or taupe and brown or tone on tone. Neatness really counts too.

You could try Sherwin-Williams to try out different paint schemes in a natural palette. Takes a bit of work to figure out the masking and such, but worth it once you get it done.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 4, 2013 at 11:54AM
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What do you need to see color on holly ?
   August 6, 2013 at 6:14PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ Victorian Bungalow & Everything Beautiful- The only thing I know for sure is a Grey Roof (One of the recommendations was a medium grey color, darker than what I currently have replaced with an architectural shingle).

I thought I wanted a sage Gray green house but I have been working with the house photo using the Sherwin Williams Masks and I can't seem to find many color combination that I can see work well together, but then again I haven't gotten many ideas of trim/shutter colors as examples. I made a trip to Benjamin Moore and found a color called Chateau that is more of a taupe. I really like it and thought it would look sharp I'm just not sure how to work with color and what trims I should be considering. However it would be nice to see my taupe color with the white trim that Victorian Bungalow just mentioned (even though earlier in the post I was advised against white trim and someone said I should go more with an off white or beige). I am still stumped how to coordinate this all with the shutters.

I currently have a white storm door and can replace it with a higher efficiency product made by Anderson and their colors only come in a few stock colors see link.: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Andersen-3000-Series-36-in-White-Aluminum-Full-View-Storm-Door-with-Brass-Hardware-HD3F36WH/100027910#.UgGoh9LD-po.

I know I'm putting the plank shutters with shutter dogs on the front right and a wrought iron window box under the left window (but no shutters there). I have taken Victorian Bungalows advice and sized the width of the awning down from 60 to 52 inches and the awning height is currently 24" high.

Eventually I will be putting new windows in the whole house but for now I'm just replacing the two front ones only. The window representative I spoke with said she can do diamond shaped cut glass at no additional cost. It is not the diamond grids which are very prominent on Tudors but a much more subtle look that you may not even be able to see from the street but would reflect prisms into the room if I didn't have shears on the windows which I do. I thought about diamond etched glass onto the left smaller window and replacing the larger right window either with the same diamond etched glass or using grills with the same look as is currently there (grids on the top only). I do love the craftsman window grills but that requires me to go with a much more expensive window and I think the style I currently have should be fine considering it would also match what is currently on the front of the carriage house.

I am keeping the wrought iron railing on the front and have an appointment to meet with my contractor tomorrow to discuss the porch options for repairing and sealing the concrete.
   August 6, 2013 at 7:14PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything Beautiful. It has been hard to visualize the photo with the textured reclaimed wood since I am only going to be painting the aluminum siding and the porch will most likely start out being a solid color. I am not making changes to the existing shape of the porch so visualizing it more in it's present state is more realistic.
   August 6, 2013 at 7:16PM
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lucindalane
I went out and worked with some colors on the Sherwin Williams site.
There is one called High Tea, which is a light taupe.
Shutter colors could be Rockwood Dark Green, Rockwood Sash Green, and Rockwood Green. There is also one I like, called Indigo, and Inkwell.
I also colored the roof a dark gray color-as you said that was what you were considering, I believe-and these colors looked nice.
Also, the High Tea coordinates nicely with a lighter, color called Khaki Shade, if you decide to do the two toned thing on the garage.
Just some thoughts, as I didn't really know how light or dark that you want your colors-I figured that you might be wanting something in a medium shade, and most of these are like that, in that they don't look too dark, or light. Of course, I realize that comes down to how it looks in the light in your environment,
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 7, 2013 at 2:00PM
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Here are two options one with white trim and another with a color called steamed milk. SW
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 7, 2013 at 3:49PM
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Holly Woodworth
STONE UPDATE!!
After long consideration I have picked the stone. This one has definite burgundy tones mixed in.
4 Likes   August 7, 2013 at 7:14PM
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Holly Woodworth
Thanks Lucindalane for the color suggestions and Everything beautiful for the drawings.
   August 7, 2013 at 7:17PM
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brickln
Beautiful!
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 7, 2013 at 11:49PM
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rinqreation
Just a little photoplay for you. I'd remove the awnings and 'wrap' the roof around the front to create a new covered entry. Mansard roof type. This way the gutter looks more in place too. The recolors show a more fun cottage style. Good luck on your restyle.
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 12:43AM
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Alexander F. Marshall
OK , If you like Hansel and Gretel, Disney land stuff you might not like my ideas. I do see possibilities. Do not do architectural shingles. Keep it simple . If you want slate make them thin square cut straight. The biggest thing you can do is extend the overhang on the gable and eves to at least 24 inches. On the colors , make a contrast between the entry and the rest of the building.

I can see a lot more how this house can be enhanced if you don't let Walt be your architect. Keep it honest.
   August 8, 2013 at 12:59AM
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Holly Woodworth
@ringreation I am so stunned by your suggestion that I immediately sent your photo to my contractor to see if he would be able to work within my existing budget. I really like the look as it has given a complete different feel to the front of the house. Thank you for your time and input. If he says yes do you think It would still be appropriate to cover the remaining A with Stone around the front door?
   August 8, 2013 at 5:07AM
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rinqreation
That's lovely!

I wouldn't cover it in stone, but that's my opinion, I like the plank and brick look. Maybe a more earthy paintcolor on the concrete steps and planter (or stone on those). A slightly larger window on the right and a more romantic front door. I like offwhite trims on a colored house, keeps it looking fresh for a long time.
If the house is not listed I would dare installing vinyl windows, but a better quality than the regular white/cream ones. (We had them installed with stone grey woodgrain exterior color and soft white interior, about 40 years paint and worry free they said).

Wish you loads of joy in your new home!
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 7:34AM
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lucindalane
I just have an amateur eye, but if you change the roof style, then the shingles running down down the side of the "A"-to my eyes anyway, come off looking awkward, because now the sides of the "A" aren't part of the roof, but now just a lower part of the house. Of course, that would mean that they would need some kind of siding. I don't see why you still couldn't use the stone. You would now possibly using less of it-or not, depending on the square footage of the lower sides of the "A" as opposed the the upper, front facing surface part. As I said, I'm just an amateur, but its not as aesthetically pleasing with the shingles on the sides of the "A" with the new mansard roof style, IMO-but I'm just talking about the shingles. The roof style is attractive-I like the mansard style, and hipped roofs anyway. Also, will you now not need the copper overhang, and would it even fit now?
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 11:51AM
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Holly Woodworth
@lucindalane that's for your input. I appreciate you jumping in with your two cents. My contractor can't see the vision of this new roof design and in his initial reaction he said it looks to big, to much and to boxy. Arrrg!! I know that ultimately this is my decision,.but it would be REALLY important to have the support of the contractor because if he can't see the vision it may not come out looking as great as it could. I had just moved into the space of falling in love with the stone faced A when ringration put this together. Everyone I have shown the photo to loves it so much more than the stone alone.

Now all that being said I can not seem to come to grips with the monotone paint examples ringration included along with the suggestions you just made about the roof line leave me wondering if I should pass on this concept. I am still on a strict budget so have to be cautious on the choices I make.
   August 8, 2013 at 12:11PM
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dbellisario
I'll pipe in on this. I know you fell in love withe change of the roof line ringration put up above, but to me it looks chopped off and makes the house proportionans out of whack.
3 Likes   August 8, 2013 at 1:00PM
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The last two drawings had vertical siding as an option. I feel it needs the stone .
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 2:39PM
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rinqreation
It is chopped off.

But no proportion was changed the way I imagined it. Thank you.

The idea is taking away some of the 'a-point' and adding some 'forward slope' on the lower half. I think a good roofer will know what to do with it shingle-wise (it's not the first mansard shape on the planet).
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 2:57PM
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rinqreation
The colors were merely thrown on in my photo editor by the way. I don't know your taste or personality, so I cannot tell you what you need to do to make this place your home. Follow your heart in this and you'll be fine.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 3:01PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ringreation Thank you so much for following this blog and providing the additional drawings and recommendation. I do love it so much. I have a roofer to do the shingles but need a contractor to work with the frame.
   August 8, 2013 at 3:02PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ringreation What is the greatest amount of depth that you recommend could be created under the overhead portion of the roof for cover from the rain when entering and exiting the house?
   August 8, 2013 at 4:26PM
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Susan Jacobs
Benjamin Moore Prescott Green is a sage-y green that I have long admired. Maybe you can use it on your shutters, or body of the house. Love this post, I'm following along with the fun now.
   August 8, 2013 at 5:45PM
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Susan Jacobs
Also... Saybrook Sage.
   August 8, 2013 at 5:46PM
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Susan Jacobs
here's a link to Prescott Green cottage exterior... http://pinterest.com/pin/89860955037212754/
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 5:53PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Susan I immediately copied your link and hopped on over to view that lovely little cottage. It is darling. Thanks for following along and the color inputs. Fun Fun Fun!
   August 8, 2013 at 5:58PM
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seeso
Some one sent me this one when in regards to my house dilemma... Mine isn't quite cottage bit has some aspects... I thought this was simple and cute. Good luck :) [houzz=
]
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 8, 2013 at 6:02PM
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Holly Woodworth
@seeso Oh what a pretty house I could definitely see myself living there. Thanks for sharing and keep your eyes open for the before and after photos.
1 Like   August 8, 2013 at 6:04PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything Beautiful This photos have really progressed from 3 weeks ago. Geez has it really been that long. I believe you have been with me throughout most of this journey while I have been culling through the many different ideas and design features and I appreciate you jumping in and making changes to the front of the house as I put them together.
   August 8, 2013 at 6:06PM
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rinqreation
Answering your question: About two feet I think. Measure the width of the front roof area next to the door take about 60% of it for the overhang. Golden ratio is 1 to 1,6 so that would look most aesthetic.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 9, 2013 at 12:45AM
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lucindalane
Well, again, I'm only an amateur, but it seems that an integral part of a cat slide is that it has, well, a point-literally. It's a rather lopsided "A", with a curved side, and that's the style. That bump out catslide is what gives your little house its unusual flair, but the mansard roof will cover the top part. However, perhaps it would be possible to modify that mansard roof to incorporate a point.
Maybe something like this?

3 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 9, 2013 at 1:42AM
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maxdc
I agree that roofing over the A section will look like a hack job - if your contractor can't see it, there might be a reason!
3 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 9, 2013 at 2:49AM
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lucindalane
Here's a more slender version, that I found in a search. I think this company is in Canada, just to give the credit for the photo. http://www.hazelmereroofing.ca/images/White-Rock-United-Church-Steeple-roof.jpg
This will certainly be different than the vision you've been sharing with us, though-if you go this route. I think that the term for this type of roof is a "tented roof," but its roots are in Russian and East European architecture-not that it didn't get adopted elsewhere, like architecture always does.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 9, 2013 at 7:28PM
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brickln
More colors and different building materials. How's it coming along?


   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 11, 2013 at 4:37AM
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Holly Woodworth
Good morning Brickin- I went to the stone yard and picked up samples of my preferred stone and got some disappointing news. Apparently the mine that this comes from produces two different colors stone. The dark burgundy and a lighter pink (depending on the side of the mountain that is currently being mined). The sample board showed the beautiful darker cranberry color and the actual stones were the lighter pink. I did find out that the stone is called Virginia Fieldstone and have been searching Google all weekend trying to find another quarry that I can call who is selling the stone to find the darker color. Any suggestions?
   August 11, 2013 at 7:23AM
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brickln
What a shame-the pic you posted was perfect. Pink would send things in a whole other direction and be limiting for future updates. Sorry to hear. I'm not from the area so I don't know what other sources would be available. Hopefully someone will see your post and refer.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 11, 2013 at 7:40AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
I ,ll check my stone yard here in Virginia . They have lots of stone .
   August 11, 2013 at 9:58AM
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lucindalane
Here's one in NC-I found it using Bing. Of course, I realze that is several states away. http://www.tablerockquarries.com/pages/specs/vafieldstone.html
   August 11, 2013 at 12:23PM
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Holly Woodworth
Thanks Everything Beautiful and Lucindalane. The local quarry in Lorton Va told me that Virginia fieldstone is mined in Southwest Virginia. I have been focusing on VA/W-VA quarries but I am beginning to think it may be mined out of the mountains on the NC/VA boarders as I'm finding the stone online in NC more than anywhere else. Guess it may be time for a road trip to examine.
1 Like   August 11, 2013 at 4:38PM
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lucindalane
I think that the one I found suggests on their webpage that it's better to see the stone in person because a photo on the Net might not give an accurate image of what the stone really looks like.
   August 11, 2013 at 5:12PM
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Dynamic Garage Door
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 11, 2013 at 5:45PM
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Holly Woodworth
Thanks for more trellis photo options!!
1 Like   August 11, 2013 at 6:03PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Holly call my dealer Charlie's Antiques , Amazing Stones ask for dean 757 566 8300 . He has stones from all over the world but his business is here in VA . He knows me well . Call today if you can they are closed Tuesday and Wednesday for deliverys .
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 12, 2013 at 4:01AM
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thechadwick3287
Holly, I've attached 3 photos of stone Tudors in my hometown. One has a covered portico similar to the ones that you're considering. Look at the dormer over the garage; I think an arched awning similar to that dormer would have a softer look. The catwalk roof is so steep and pointy that I'd rather avoid more sharp angles on it. The one with the red door just kinda reminds me of yours more. I wish you could afford an arched door. Maybe if one were available from a salvage yard? If not, the arched awning would kind of emulate it. Also, note that the mortar joints were finished with a rough texture that makes it look old and rustic, like an English country house. Could be a good look for your stone veneer. And the other house has only one window with shutters. Note that they are a V groove board style; you could potentially build these yourself. The small cutouts on the shutters, and the subtly scalloped details on the half timbering could be done to add interest to your window and door trim. As far as stone goes, I have an emotional attachment to Wissahickon schist, which which is the bedrock and most popular building stone in older Philadelphia suburbs. Thin veneer is available from the Wissahickon Quarry in Glenside, PA, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's expensive.
   August 12, 2013 at 8:11AM
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Karen Nunn
If located in SW VA near Roanoke you should contact TBS Construction out of Moneta, VA 540-484-4752.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 12, 2013 at 9:23AM
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victorianbungalowranch
I think the Mansard roof would look totally wrong for your house. The "A" is the defining characteristic of your house and it would destroy it. Plus because the "A: is deliberately assymetrical, it would look strange, like the building is slumping over, even if you found a contractor who could handle the complicated angles. Plus it is likely expensive.

The rendering is from one angle which minimizes the asymmetry. And renderings from straight on minimizes projections. I think if you saw it in 3-D, you would see that the shapes don't relate well, and I know of no historic precedent of such a design.

There was a style briefly popular around 1940 called Norman Revival which featured short stubby towers, typically inset into a corner created by two gables and used as the entry. There are also various French Revival styles that used Mansard roofs, and a revival around 1970 called Mansard style--now considered one of the ugliest of the period without major refinements.

To make such a style work on your house would require tearing out the "A" and building a round or at least a symmetrical entry, and would utterly change the style of your house. It is possible, but not worth the expense in my opinion. I would stick with the copper hood of a moderate size. More appropriate, and easier to get the details right. And I would place it high enough so that the existing light fixture can be used.

Siding Decisions:

Since the siding on the "A" is coming down anyway, I suggest you carefully remove it to see what is underneath. It might have original stucco or even brick or stone detailing, and the original curve, And it will give your contractor an idea of what you are dealing with. You might be able to just restore the original finish.

Stone can vary greatly from samples, and how it is installed can alter its appearance. I recommend supervising the job to get the look you want. The more variation in size and color, the more of an art it is to put in place. If the stone you want isn't available, it might be better to go with one with less variation.

Brick and stone were quite often mixed in this style of house, and it might be nice to include some brick someplace to tie it in with the brick on the side of the house. Perhaps just a simple brick facing to match the existing brick would look nice. Or possibly on the patio or stairs, or retaining wall.
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 13, 2013 at 10:36AM
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nikawareham
Sherwin williams (zeus) is a very pretty grey green/ tan.
   August 13, 2013 at 6:10PM
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nikawareham
That is a portico that is premade and sent to you. Also what about a pergola running off both sides of the A roof? No shudders since the house isnt' symmetric. Invest in painting the house, the roof ,a new railing, and landscaping
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 13, 2013 at 6:15PM
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Adrianne
How about.. Doing an arched door. This house originally probably had one..

You could do a standing seam barrel dormer over the front door like this but just have the standing seam part.
additions to an existing historic home

and a matching catslide..
I bet if you dig in there.. You will find that catslide was originally curved
East-West House

a matching gable vent would top it off perfectly
exteriors

The Hansel & Gretel cottages in SLC have a brick/stucco mix.. I'm not sure I'm sold on it but here's what it looks like
Tudor Entry

The door typically has a keystone arch
Some are brick with rock around the doors, some are brick & stucco.
   August 13, 2013 at 10:35PM
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Adrianne
aww man! just read all the posts.. I'm just re-inventing the wheel! Good Luck. Looks like fun!
   August 13, 2013 at 10:39PM
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nikawareham
This is sw Zeus. The second pic is the lower half of the house and fence
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 14, 2013 at 8:35AM
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Holly Woodworth
@ Everything beautiful I spoke with Dean at Charlies Antiques he was extremely nice and helpful unfortunately he is does not carry the Virginia Fieldstone. I spent Monday calling many different quarries and have sadly resigned to the fact that I may have to choose a different stone.
   August 14, 2013 at 7:43PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ thechadwick3287 Great Post! I've read through it many times as you included so much detail with each of the three photos. I did look up your Wissahickon schist and can understand why you like it so much. What a beautiful choice. I approve and would put this on my house. Wonder how much they would charge to ship to Northern VA?? Thanks for your help and feedback
   August 14, 2013 at 7:49PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ victorianbungalow It has been such a pleasure having you contribute to my blog. I have learned so much historically and your accuracy and attention to detail is outstanding.

After my initial reaction to the Mansford roof design I have realized that this is not correct for the house and have settled back into working with the stones (still working through the color issues/acquisition etc) and copper awnings.

The most recent contractor that came out felt that the awning needed to have a structural support built underneath because he didn't believe it could support it's own weight from a snow storm. I'm a bit surprised by that since all of the manufacturers in the Louisiana area said it could be installed directly to the house by just the copper flanges, and only a few of them even made the awnings with additional supports.

Siding:

Yes plan is still moving forward slowly but surely and the aluminum will be coming off in full investigative mode. Wouldn't be great if I found a wonderful surprise. I'm still haven't gotten to choosing colors for the house since they have to be keyed off of the stone's color. So until the stone is decided that is still on hold. But all recommendations are welcomed.
   August 14, 2013 at 8:06PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ nikawareham Thanks!!! for the Zeus Color sample. It would have worked perfectly with my original stone choice. Darn darn darn. I like the color and feel it has lots of potential. I have been playing around on Sherwin Williams color visualizer and hadn't yet come across this one so many thanks for bringing it to my attention.

The prebuilt portico is pretty. too bad it is out of Canada (I think). I did do a search for an American built company but didn't find one. My only question would be if angles would compliment or fight with the existing steepness of my current A; is it customizable and would I be able to get one delivered for under my 2K budget.
   August 14, 2013 at 8:14PM
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Holly Woodworth
@ Adrianne You've provided 4 great ideas with matching photos.

I would love to do an arched door. I even went out online looking for one about a month ago. The problem is they are not cheap, so for my initial renovation I am sticking with roof, painting the siding (color combinations still undecided), new wrought iron railing, chimney relining & repairs and changing the A to most likely stone and including a new copper awning. Oh and giving my landscaping a boost. To stay within my budget I am only able to paint the porch vs. pavers or flagstone which of course would look awesome once I can come up with an additional $4,500.
   August 14, 2013 at 8:25PM
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jnobob
Add bright plants and get rid of that terrible orange things u have
   August 15, 2013 at 6:08AM
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jnobob
And fix the rail
   August 15, 2013 at 6:10AM
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jnobob
Fix the rail
   August 15, 2013 at 6:10AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Thanks Holly. I learn a lot researching these things too. It helps to know enough to figure out what search terms to look for. People make mistakes with their homes because they buy stuff they like and put it in, but then find that the result isn't quite what they wanted. It is so much easier and better to use what you got and enhance it than to completely change the style. But you first have to know what that style is, and sometimes it takes a bit of detective work and creativity.

I like the door you have BTW. A different storm could be nice since that is what you see anyway. Or even painting the existing one a darker color.

Here's a DIY stencil floor link that could be modified to dress up your steps and tie them in with the rest of your home. http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/diy-floors-painted-stenciled-a-144119
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 15, 2013 at 11:41AM
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abigail822
When does the work start? i can't wait to see the after photos.
   August 18, 2013 at 8:17AM
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Holly Woodworth
@abigail822 I'm ready also... Having to start over picking out stone again and still waiting on specs for copper awning. These folks seem to be taking their sweet time and it appears they don't work under the same schedules or urgency we do (and in my limited experience this is pretty much consistent with most of the awning vendors) arrrgh! The order of repairs 1)chimney 2&3) stone and awning 4) roofing 5&6) wrought iron & painting.
   August 18, 2013 at 8:29AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Are you going with the Pennsylvanian field stone ?
   August 18, 2013 at 8:31AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything Beautiful I have not seen any actual samples of that stone only photos on the internet. I found a Quarry that sent me photos of the "Red" Pennsylvania Field stone (see photo) but I am unsure if that would be too much red
   August 18, 2013 at 8:36AM
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lucindalane
Holly, I admit that I don't know "beans" about the stone situation, but do you think it might be possible to ask them how much they would charge to send you, basically, a "mock up" of the stones. All they'd be doing was to be gluing some stone pieces-of which I'm sure they have plenty-to a piece of MDF or something substantial enough to bear the weight. Or, maybe they'd just send you the stone pieces, and you could then arrange them-even take them outside and hold them up to the front of your house to see how they actually look in your environment. If your still interested, perhaps that NC quarry might do the same?
Having said that, the photo looks like it has quite a variety of shades of different stones to go along with the ones with the red tones. So, if you decided to take a chance with this quarry, you could do your best to have it understood that you want the stones to be a mixture of the different shades in with the "red" ones
Just some thoughts.
   August 18, 2013 at 11:47AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
If you have the mason hand pick the right combination you'ill be OK with this color not to far off from the Virginia stone. He can't just slap this stone up without asking you how much of each color do you want . example, if i were doing this for you i would lay a 6'x6' area on the floor and use 60% gray 30% brown/ red and 20% tan then ask you how you feel about that combination, you create the combination by adding or taking away the colors that you like the best. Say you want more tans, less grays then you adjust the percentage until your happy . Then it goes up not before. It must look natural and have balance . You can't just put this up right out of the bin .NO NO NO . You may have to get two pallets to make up the difference, so what use the rest as dry stack stone for your flower beds. What's the price per ton?
2 Likes   August 18, 2013 at 12:02PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
They won't do that in any stone yard that i know of. They will only sell it by the ton 1/2 ton, what you see is what you get .They don't count how many reds, browns, tans go in the pallet. You might get more of one color than the other. Its not that big of an area, two tons is more than enough .
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 18, 2013 at 12:13PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful Thanks!! Most stone yards around here do not allow you to hand pick each stone you are limited to purchasing the pre weighed bundle. I only know of one yard in the area that will allow that and they don't have the VA fieldstone option. The cost for the VA fieldstone is $385/ton and the chocolate grey combination is 320/ton. A ton covers about 100 sq feet and the mason who was out this morning said I had about 85-100 fsq. feet to be covered on the A. His quote is for labor only which leaves me the ability to pick out and purchase my own stone.
   August 18, 2013 at 12:23PM
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Holly Woodworth
@lucindalane I called and spoke with the NC Quarry they are a distributor only to stone yards although they were extremely friendly and helpful and pointed me to several local yards. That being said thanks for the idea for getting a stone board as the quarry with the red Pennsylvania Field stone did mention that they would put something like that together for me . Still don't know which stone but do have an excellent mason to do the work so happy dance there.
   August 18, 2013 at 12:30PM
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lucindalane
Wow, a ton sounds like such a big amount, so these stones really are heavy, aren't they? I'm looking forward to seeing the result of your choice, Holly.
   August 18, 2013 at 12:34PM
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lucindalane
I know you are anxious-I would be, too. but you're getting there. I'm glad that it is possible to see some sort of actual example, so I hope that you can find what you want and somebody that can supply it for you.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 18, 2013 at 12:38PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Holly you know how long it would take to hand pick stone at the yard ? No not at the yard .Once they deliver the stones to your house , then sort them out as i said. you have to see them as they would be placed on the home. Therefore a 6'x6' area on the floor with the mix of stones as i suggested for you to see if the pattern is what you want. Get it? LOL
   August 18, 2013 at 1:45PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
The stone price sounds about right, plus delivery . What mortar is he using? I need to know. Is he mixing it himself ?
   August 18, 2013 at 2:01PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Look at this house and see the pattern of the stone you can see the proper balance in the stone, they look good .
   August 18, 2013 at 6:34PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Forgot the picture .
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 18, 2013 at 6:35PM
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libradesigneye
holly - just popping in to see your progress. Yes, i think too much red - red / purples are not the color direction you were heading. If you love gray, maybe gray greens are more the earthy look you were hoping for.
   August 19, 2013 at 3:19PM
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kendallboyd
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   August 19, 2013 at 3:21PM
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lucindalane
I think I'm drawn to this blue color. I liked the shape of the shutters on this Tudor style house, and I think it would be a nice way to add even more curves to go with the cat slide and the porch. Blue isn't really a traditional Tudor color, but I think it looks lovely here-and I also posted another house earlier with the blue shutters. It also would match the shade of the brick, if you go with the ones you had in the photo of the stack ones.

   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 24, 2013 at 11:02AM
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brickln
How's it coming along, Holly. I know you're having trouble deciding on the stone. Have you started repairs to the roof and railings?
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 25, 2013 at 1:26AM
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Holly Woodworth
@ lucindalane This a pretty house with the perfectly manicured stepping stones. I won't be able to use those shutters as I don't have arched windows but I am going to be going with the board and batten style. I'm definitely not a blue person so I'll be staying away from that color line. Everything I do with color starts with the stone, including roof painting etc. so I'm at a bit of a stand still until I get the stone figured out.
   August 25, 2013 at 7:30AM
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Holly Woodworth
@brickin So here is the update. Stone still undecided. I have gone to several other stone yards and just can't find anything that excited me as much as the original Virginia Fieldstone that I originally fell in love with.

So my contractor stopped by and suggested I look at a manufactured stone made by Environmental Stoneworks at http://www.estoneworks.com/index.php/site/products/northeast The good news is there are several here I could live with such as Buckeye (Rubble Fieldstone), Bucks County (Rubble Fieldstone), New England (Fieldstone Fieldstone) and Pennsylvania (Fieldstone Fieldstone).

Can Anyone tell me what is the difference between regular fieldstone and rubble fieldstone is?

I also found the company: Plygem formally known as United Stone Veneer who has a mix that I really love ((see photo - lots of vibrant colors combinations). The only problem is this particular look is a proprietary mix from a stone yard in PA so on Monday I'll be calling and making some inquiries to see if I purchase from them if I can have it shipped directly down to VA.

Any advise pro or con for either of these two companies?

I don't want to order roof yet as the color will be affected by the final choice of stone. Here is the link to the color choices for the roof. http://www.certainteed.com/Products/308747 Previous posters in this blog thought a nice medium dark gray would look good. I have made one 3 hour road trip so far checking out the Georgetown Gray, Cobblestone Gray and Driftwood colors. I have ruled out Driftwood and the Cobblestone Gray is pretty but it's really light. Today I'm off to see Colonial Slate, Pewter, and the two darker colors charcoal and moire black. The roofing company contract said damage could occur below so I will have that done prior to having the railings replaced to avoid any accidents.

Still on the ledge not knowing which direction to go regarding paint and trim colors and desperately still needing suggestions but I know that I also have to wait for stone and roof decisions first. Patience Breath Patience.
   August 25, 2013 at 8:38AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Everything beautiful Must have been a busy week I just saw the photo you attached of the house with stone on the front as an example. I will insist they use the Type S mortar to install the stones. The first quote I got from a Mason contractor was $22/sq foot for install alone. My contractor said that was highway robbery and that was when he told me the Environmental Stoneworks product estoneworks.com could be installed for 18-19 sq foot including material. He is pushing this company on me but since I like the internet photo of the Plygem product better (from photos only) that means I have to find another mason who is cheaper for installation only. Back to Angies List for another week of calling and setting appointments to interview contractors.
   August 25, 2013 at 8:48AM
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lucindalane
Ah, I stand corrected. Just goes to show that one has to be cautious about what is read, because I just read info that said curved shutters could be added to a house to give it a Tudor look, but they apparently didn't know that's not how its supposed to be done. So, proper info duly noted.
You're not a "blue" person, so that's understandable. I am generally not a "green" person, especially what I consider those ugly "olive" green colors that they used in the forties and fifties. I remember having those colors in the house I grew up in, until my folks decided to remodel it, in the-at the time-more modern style of 1960. My poor dad had no choice when he came home one day and my mother had ripped down the old wallpaper, saying that she'd rather live with the bare walls than the old, dirty paper. I was still a pretty small kid at the time, and my sister and I thought it was a great adventure, and merrily helped tear it off. Boy, did we ever get dirty-but it was fun. It was rather amazing how much dirty dust accumulates behind old wallpaper. So, that was my first experience in "remodeling" a home. :) About six years later my Sunday School class painted over some more of the ugly green with a more pleasing off white paint in our classroom at my church.
So, hope it all comes together for you soon.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 25, 2013 at 11:17AM
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Helen Thomas
Everyone, thank you SO MUCH for contributing to this thread! I'm learning a lot and can't wait to see further developments. Best wishes, Holly!
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 25, 2013 at 12:44PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Holly color is easy just do a take off of the stone, your talented , use the tans ,gray's, reds or cranberry to coordinate the home with the stone. On the low side for the stone install 15 to 17, he is on the high side but don't go for lowest price on this, its the focal point and he better be good other wise it's not going to be a clean cut job. When working with natural stone it has to be shaped to fit the puzzle or you'ill wind up with peaces that just don't look like they belong. Type S is good.
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    August 26, 2013 at 10:47AM
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Holly Woodworth
*Update: I took some down time over the long Labor Day weekend to get away from construction research. I took it upon myself to tear out the hearth with a hammer and screwdriver to make room for the new woodstove. Still waiting for the stoneboards from Environmental Stoneworks to arrive to make the final stone decision. The jury is still out on the product pictured above as I haven't been able to get a clear understanding of what the plygem product is.
1 Like   September 4, 2013 at 5:35PM
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thechadwick3287
Holly, I think Wissahickon schist is pretty expensive. The pre-war stone houses in the Philadelphia area are generally schist, and by the 50's a mix of schist and granite was more common. I think the quarrying is expensive. I did some research and the Wissahickon Quarry in Glenside makes a laser cut stone veneer so you should call them for a price quote. Worse comes to worst you found out that you can't afford it.
   September 17, 2013 at 10:58AM
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Kathryn Peltier Design
I just read through this discussion. Holly, did you proceed with your project? I'd love to see the final product!
2 Likes   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    February 22, 2014 at 9:02AM
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Holly Woodworth
The project is 99% complete still need shutters on left front of house wrought iron window box on left side of house and porch painted and of course the yard cleaned up. We have had 3 months of snow and so the project has been moving slowly.
1 Like   March 4, 2014 at 8:40PM
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Holly Woodworth
Work done: new chimney, (new wood stove and granite surround inside) 2nd chimney on left of house removed. New roof, new cedar shake vinyl siding on front of house new stone front, new wrought iron, new shutters and gutters, new storm door and light fixtures. Entire house and garage painted. I will forward garage photos tomorrow
1 Like   March 4, 2014 at 8:48PM
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Holly Woodworth
More construction photos
6 Likes   March 4, 2014 at 8:57PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Nice Hollywood very nice.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    March 4, 2014 at 10:24PM
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donnawildy
How about an awning or verandah style roof covering the whole front in the shape it's in and that will give you cover for the whole front and use what you are using to replace the roof. I think it would look like it was always there. Donna
   March 5, 2014 at 1:20AM
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donnawildy
Oh I see you've done it. It looks beautiful, you should be proud of the finish. I love it. Donna
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    March 5, 2014 at 1:24AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Looks great! So is the awning coated to keep it copper colored or will you let it weather to a verdigris? So nice to be able to see the original door too, but I wonder how well it is going to hold up against the weather. The little lights look nice too--perfectly scaled. So were you able to recycle the old fixture someplace?.

Just a small point, but shutters should be mounted on the window casing and have shutterdogs to look operational. You can get fake hinges as well to complete the look.

Got any plans for the carriage house--like paint and a pergola across the front?
1 Like   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    March 5, 2014 at 6:15AM
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Holly Woodworth
The carriage house was painted got a new maroon storm door and shutters on the side with the stairs (yet to be installed) will also have wrought iron window boxes on the front above the garage doors (matching the one on the house under the little window)

The lower color of the garage will be the same color that the main house front porch will be painted.
5 Likes   March 5, 2014 at 6:54AM
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Holly Woodworth
@victorian bungalow i am letting the awning weather as i think will fit in with the older house look better. I still have the original light fixture and may eventually replace the rear porch light with it.

The shutters were installed while i was out of town and i do plan on having the contractor come back for the shutter dogs ( I've seen so many different installation styles that i haven't decided where the placement of the hardware should be
   March 5, 2014 at 6:56AM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful I've been looking at a table sets like your photo. I haven't yet found one that is small enough yet has the swivel rocker (but then again it hasn't been the highest priority)
   March 5, 2014 at 7:00AM
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houssaon
I'm glad to see your work. It turned out great!
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    March 5, 2014 at 7:03AM
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Holly Woodworth
Old garage photo
   March 5, 2014 at 7:09AM
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victorianbungalowranch
I'm not sure if shutters are required on the left window of your house--the window box should be enough, and the spacing looks really tight. It was common to have a small feature window back then, and shutters don't have to be on every window.

Garage looks nice, esp. the new doors. You really went to town and I bet the neighbors are very appreciative.
   March 5, 2014 at 7:09AM
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Kathryn Peltier Design
Your house and carriage house look fabulous (can't wait to see it with the planters planted)! One tiny comment: I actually like the house better without the shutters: it makes the stone and door stand out even more. If you are going to add shutters to the little window, however, do just one larger shutter (the width of the window) opened to the left (and as victorianbungalow said, add some shutter hardware - you can find imitation stuff on Amazon or you can often find some vintage stuff on Ebay inexpensively - look for "shutter dogs").
   March 5, 2014 at 7:16AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Kathryn & Victorian thanks for the shutter comments. I never originally planned on shutters on the left side as the recommendation was to go without to keep the house in character with the period but when I saw the finished product it just looked a little plain and needed a bit more of a lift. I'll order the boxes get them installed and check back in for opinions.
1 Like   March 5, 2014 at 7:24AM
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Holly Woodworth
@Victorian I love the improvements and when it is completed I will have the before and after photos posted in the appropriate forum. Every idea has come from the people on this site who lovingly gave of there time to assist me in the process. I am so grateful for the tips and advice that I received that gave me the confidence in making my decisions. The finished product looks so different from where I originally started and yet there were hundreds of hours I agonized over the decisions of material colors designs and shapes. Hiring and firing of contractors, cold weather, snow and more snow. I feel that we are almost there and am looking forward to getting into the flower beds with a trowel and packages of annuals.
2 Likes   March 5, 2014 at 7:34AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Looks a lot like the drawing boy it's been a long time good to see your getting it done . Proud of you Hollywood.
1 Like   March 5, 2014 at 7:34AM
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armygirl1987
Awesome update.
   March 5, 2014 at 7:49AM
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Holly Woodworth
Snow picture
3 Likes   March 5, 2014 at 11:47AM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
WOW That's like story book material . Can't wait till you finish so we can do your landscape.
   March 5, 2014 at 12:17PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful yes I'm looking forward to being bitten by the spring bug and doing the beds
1 Like   March 5, 2014 at 12:40PM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
This is all my work by the way.
   March 5, 2014 at 12:51PM
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Holly Woodworth
@everything beautiful Yes you were instrumental in working with me on my vision. The entire conception process took about 6 months to come up with the concept and materials list. Lots of false starts and disappointments in having to come up with alternate building materials. Tons and tons of research. You were there through the whole process along with a handful of other folks on this board who made my concept a reality. I just reread through the entire thread and it is overwhelming seeing the process develop into the completed project. I am single and really felt that I had developed a new family throughout this process and felt good about each decision, because so many of you were supporting me and making sure I didn't do something really stupid.
3 Likes   March 5, 2014 at 1:16PM
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Holly Woodworth
Oh and a big thank you for your contribution!!!
   March 5, 2014 at 1:17PM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
We love ya Hollywood.
   March 5, 2014 at 2:19PM
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brickln
Looks gorgeous, Holly. Love that you got the copper you wanted and were able to keep that door! The house has a lot of charm and character; hope you're enjoying it.
   March 5, 2014 at 2:26PM
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Holly Woodworth
@Brickin I'm glad you saw the photos. The awning was just installed last weekend so I haven't had time for this all to sink in yet. Few more tweeks before completion. Then I will sigh a big sigh of relief. Thank you for being there for me.
2 Likes   March 5, 2014 at 4:11PM
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lucindalane
I was so hoping that you'd post a photo of your little cottage after you remodeled it. Thanks so much for sharing it. Maybe Old Man Winter will finally move along and you can start planting some pretty flowers.
   Thanked by Holly Woodworth    March 5, 2014 at 11:11PM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Hey holly can you post some close up picture of the stone work ? I want to see the finish work if you don't mind.
   March 22, 2014 at 5:42PM
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