Can I lose the boulders and gain a mantel?
ckuretski
July 22, 2013 in Design Dilemma
I have always wanted to lose the stone and gain a real mantel. My husband is convinced it can't be done - or too expensive. Any suggestions?
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
glitzy
I suspect these may not be real boulders, but a faux stone product that is easily removed from the walls. It will be a messy job for sure, but then you can repair the dry wall and install any type of fireplace surround and mantle you would prefer.
July 22, 2013 at 11:22pm        Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
duchessofdelmar
we have a faux stone fireplace and a big hunky mantle. I'll take a picture tomorrow (though I won't clean it off for you because we are under construction and our whole house is in the living room). So if you decide removing the boulders is too much you can at least still have the mantle.
July 22, 2013 at 11:30pm      Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
smdrovetto
My former boyfriend had a firplace EXACTLY like yours, except he had higher ceilings, so there was even MORE to love! :)

I hated it, and one Sunday I couldn't stand it anymore, and he got a crowbar, and started pulling the boulders off the wall. They are hollow, but still heavy, and were held on the wall with mortar and chicken wire, so I had to be there to help hold on, because they were wired together. We had to use wire cutters to get them off in manageable pieces. There should really be two guys.

He is not a big guy, but very strong, and he had to throw his body into it. And the debris was heavy, and a mess.

He managed most of the demo, but did not have the time to construct a new fireplace.

The wall did suffer, but not too badly. And honestly, we both agreed that the wall left behind even looked better.

We had marble that was just flat on the wall, and a beautiful mantle. We didn't do a whole surround.

We are not a couple anymore, and I actually don't remember how much it all cost. We hired a contractor, and it was a few thousand dollars. They always mark up materials, etc.

But it was so worth it. It completely changed the look of the room. I had talked him into getting new furniture before that, and the new fireplace even made the furniture look better. I was surprised, even after we had just taken the boulders off, how much light they soaked up. And it improved even more when the marble was installed.

When we started dating, he still had this REVOLTING furniture from when he was in medical school. It was threadbare, and this horrible pattern from the 80's. Well, once I managed to convince him to get rid of it, he also bought a piano, but nothing looked good because the fireplace was so dominant. Oh! I just remembered, the furniture was so bad, Goodwill wouldn't take it!! I had to bribe the guys to haul it out of there!

He had done nothing to the joint from when he bought it. He wouldn't even heat canned soup to eat. I would see forks sticking out of Campbells' Chunky Soup cans.

The previous owners had put indoor outdoor carpet on the deck, and the rain had soaked it and rotted the wood underneath. Your foot would sink down about an inch walking on it. If I hadn't taken care of that, he would have been found starved to death, stuck in a hole in the deck!:)

His friends tried to talk me into getting back together with him, but he took way too much supervision! :) :)

It could cost more than you want, depending on how long you plan to live there, etc But I know our new fireplace raised the market value of the house a lot! You would definitely easily get your investment back I know our old fireplace would be an instant deal breaker for many people.
July 23, 2013 at 2:05am        Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Ancient Surfaces
I deal with this issue you are facing about 10 time a month! my recommendation is always the same if you can hardy back and drywall/paint over the entire thing without demolition that will save you a pretty buck that you'll later spend on a real limestone fireplace option with a lot of character. The only set back is that you will add a total of 2" more to the existing faux stone you've got there. but the savings are far worth it i think.
July 24, 2013 at 8:14am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Ancient Surfaces
Here are some examples of what the end result may look like.
July 24, 2013 at 8:22am      Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
jilljill24
We have recently ripped out ugly stone fireplace which dominated the room and made every piece of furniture look 'wrong'. It took a builder one day to remove and another to rebuild a frame and fireboard (dry wall) new chimney breast. So that might give you an idea of what it may cost? Really, it has been SO worth it! Every time I came in the room it was something to detest, now I just love looking at it! Haven't attaché a mantel yet but probably will.
July 24, 2013 at 12:34pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
jilljill24
smdrovetto, lol, loved your story !
July 24, 2013 at 12:35pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
jilljill24
July 24, 2013 at 12:41pm        Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Ancient Surfaces
Much better Jill but you still need a mantle to frame the fire box.
July 24, 2013 at 2:09pm        Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
smdrovetto
Oh, thanks, Jill! It felt good to hear your story, too! I felt exactly the same when I would walk in the door! :)
July 24, 2013 at 2:15pm        Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Jeffrey Brooks Interior Design
Fire places like yours are not easy to tame. Clients who opt to go with the rustic sensibility discover that the wall was actually just in need of the right surroundings. Rustic traditional, rustic modern, and even industrial elements will deliver a spectacular room for you. Check out Elle Decor magazine and Restoration Hardware online for ideas.
A pet peeve I have with fireplaces like yours is that builders will use Colonial trim on walls beside the stone and run them into the chimney sides. Now you don't know how to handle it! If you'd prefer to do something more traditional then by all means swing the sledge hammer. Once you've taken out the stone veneer you can do something more to your taste.
July 24, 2013 at 2:23pm        Thanked by ckuretski
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Ancient Surfaces
Well put Jeffrey.
July 24, 2013 at 2:30pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
ckuretski
Thank you all. The same rocks are on the front of my house - so I'm done. I'll have to make sure that when they come off, my stone and hardwood floors won't be damaged. Should I contact a contractor or a masonry person?
July 24, 2013 at 4:05pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
bubblyjock
I'd ask around for personal referrals, and get a few quotes, yes. Just make sure they're insured, because there might be quite the mess!
July 24, 2013 at 4:20pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Jeffrey Brooks Interior Design
you should do well with a general contractor
July 24, 2013 at 4:58pm   
Sign Up to comment
Related Discussions
Can I plane or sand back hardwood to gain 1/8"?
I'm working with a vintage console that I'm retrofitting...
Can I use inserts without losing clean style?
I have white tiles picked with a flat finish and I...
Losing my mind!! What can I do with this room?!?
We just painted & I'm hating it! It's a very cool blue...
Can I merge ideabooks? And without losing comments?
We frequently share ideabooks with clients and occasionally...
More Discussions
What is your favorite white to use in open great room with vaulted ce
Be drown leather, reclaimed wood tables and deep gray...
Is it possible to get a four piece bathroom in this space?
Hi, at the moment we have a situation where we want...
Renovating multifamily house
We are buying a multifamily house that needs a lot...
Back Porch Decor? What do you think?
I am trying to spiff up the back porch and would love...
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™