Need help on style of porch and front door!
rc m
August 29, 2013
We've recently purchased this house and want to add a front door and a porch onto the centre front, but cannot come up with anything that we like and that suits the style... Part of the house was built in the 1870's...

Look forward to the suggestions!
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chambers1589
What area are you located in? You aren't from the US, right?
    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 29, 2013 at 4:43PM
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OnePlan
hi ! congratulations ! it looks a lovely home ! I'm trying to dig out a pic of a porch with storage for logs either side - can't find the one I want to add right now ! must be on other laptop ...
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 29, 2013 at 11:58PM
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OnePlan
did a google search instead ... this one is a bit longer than you need .. unless you actually take it along the entire front - adding glass in the roof above the window areas ? but the shape of the roof is good for your height above new door and window above !
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 12:04AM
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Rina
It looks as though there was a door there originally. How great if you could find a photograph of the house from that time. It may be stating the obvious to say that the door should be in the period, but though some old houses can do with modern additions I don't think this is one of them. I found this simple Victorian-style door on http://www.cotswood-doors.co.uk/product-details/105/352/30857/External-Doors/Victorian-Edwardian-and-Georgian-Doors/Victoria-Park-P20D9-Victorian-Doors-from-the-Victorian-Georgian-and-Edwardian-Periods-.htm. (NB: Not recommending orange stripes.) I think the porch should not extend further sideways than halfway between the door and the window on each side. That should keep the beautiful simplicity and symmetry of the house intact.
9 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 1:10AM
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Rina
Didn't work, did it?
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 1:11AM
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chambers1589
Clicked on your profile and I think I answered my question. You're from the UK! Your house is wonderful and pretty different from anything we have in the US. I love how your house has subtle Gothic sensibilities. When you see those influences on this side of the pond they're almost always pronounced and a little forced. All of this is to say, sorry, I love your house but I can't be much help.
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 11:21AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Give us a call and we will draw up something nice for this space in a 2 D or 3 D full color rendering .
    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 1:15PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
2 D Renditions
1 Like    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 1:19PM
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Hudson Street Design
Love your house and yes it needs something. Here is an idea
7 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 1:39PM
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anne dee
This would be nice frontage for yr home

37 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    August 30, 2013 at 1:45PM
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taylvs3
Try a brick or stone porch accented with columns. My 100 year old home has a wooden porch, which while charming, makes it difficult to have a container garden. Here: http://my.diynetwork.com/crash-me-please/South/Memphis-TN/detail.esi?oid=30714526.
    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 2:01PM
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rc m
Thanks Taylvs3 - like the idea of brick and columns (but not too pronounced)... Scuse my innocence, but what d'ya mean by 'container garden'???
1 Like    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 2:26PM
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bubblyjock
Charming house!

One Plan's idea is good, and appropriate to the vernacular of a house of that style and vintage, a cottage roof on a shallow-ish porch. It would also be historically accurate to glaze the roof of the porch, if that tickles your fancy, but it is a bit more expensive usually.

I can't quite tell from the photo, but it looks like there may be the remnants of an early porch, judging by the little black dots running along the wall between the upstairs and downstairs windows?

Did you try searching your address on google images? Sometimes an old photo of a property will show up, in which case you might even see what and where the original porch might have been!

You presumably would also need to get planning permission, which is a drag, but worth it in the long run, so you don't get slapped with fines, or a demolition order!
1 Like    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 2:35PM
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taylvs3
Almost more like a small portico than a Southern porch. A container garden is made up of assorted plants in various, I.e. terra cotta, ceramic, containers, rather than planted in the ground. It can be helpful if you're just getting your plants started, if you have very cold winters, or if you're like me and your yard is full of weeds that you need to kill before you resod and plant.
    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 3:03PM
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anne dee
you could add turrets to the sides and have a mini manor ; -)

    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 3:34PM
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joloel
I'd put one with large windows for plants, benches for sitting built in too and hooks and space for an umbrella stand. Simple roof sloping to both sides and overhang and pitch in keeping with house.
A task worthy of an architect.
    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 3:36PM
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anne dee
another
7 Likes    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 3:39PM
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midrashist
do you actually want to sit on porch (way we used to more decades ago on this side of pond), or are you mainly wanting not to stand fumbling for keys in the rain? what do you want to do on your porch? do you have a historical society that would have pictures? Do be careful of not making the inside too dark. (what is the exposure? (where is the sun?).
3 Likes    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 9:50PM
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midrashist
if you really want to sit on it, then post a photo of what you'd be looking at too, so we can see the scale of the total space. looks lovely already, with lots of potential.
    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 9:52PM
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Ironwood Builders
Great brickwork on your home, love the detail. Because of the limitations of the second story window above the former(?) front door, a flatter roof is necessary. Taking from Ann Dee's first post of a vine covered pergola, a timbered front with flat roof over the entry and open wings would allow light to enter the windows while providing cover for the door in inclement weather.[houzz=
3 Likes    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 10:21PM
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Ironwood Builders
Some imagination is necessary to see the center roofed section with flanking wings of open timber. Liking the clipped arch roof idea with the simple Tuscan columns to support the roof and timbers.
    Bookmark   August 30, 2013 at 10:25PM
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Nest.
ALL this charming house needs is perhaps a black and white awning to differentiate the front door. I would not disturb the integrity of the style of the architecture. Also, add window boxes and it would be simple and perfect!!!!
4 Likes    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 6:39AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Two options . The patio floor can be yes more brick it was the building material choice of the time, nothing last longer than brick in colonial times . The column also in brick the over hang, copy your existing roof material and keep it simple They did not have our modern materials .
6 Likes    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 8:30AM
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Classical Home Design, Inc. by Susan Berry
PLEASE hire a professional architect or residential designer experienced in designing historical properties. While many of the FREE "pro" ideas presented here are interesting, NONE of them are proper solutions for your historical home. Cut and paste 3-D CAD solutions are not appropriate for an 1800s house. Proper proportion, scale and detail make the difference in maintaining your homes value.
30 Likes    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 12:37PM
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judianna20
So, what is behind the middle window? That is where you want the entrance.
    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 2:31PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
However simple a rendering 3 D or 2 D it's merely conceptual to determine clients taste, it's not a historical drawing but conceptual in design, allowing the home owner to make suggestions to his likes and dislikes . In which case the historical society would make recommendations for the materials allowed . The drawing would then be used to reflect those materials and presented to the owners without having to spend a lot of money up front with an architect before a concept exist, first you must develop that concept, depending on what has been selected for the project, cosmetic changes or structural changes, will determine if we take the drawing to an architect for plans . We have two on board . This drawing as simple as it was , was submitted to the historical architectural review broad here in Historical Williamsburg V.A. The changes to the homes patio area had to conform to historical values.The home being over a hundred years old. Any changes however minor had to be approved by a stringent historical review broad and the county . Never under estimate the power of a 2 D or 3 D drawing. Words are not enough to describe what you are about to do for a client.
3 Likes    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 5:53PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Here are your verbal recommendations for curb appeal in another post. i made a visual representation of your suggestions for curb appeal next to mine . Remember the clients problem was the area rt of the windows . Second drawing is my suggestion with the windows. you can't visualize the two opinions without some side by side comparison.
1 Like    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 6:03PM
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Classical Home Design, Inc. by Susan Berry
3-D "cut and paste" can be a great visualization tool for simple projects. For properly scaled projects designed by someone aware of historical architectural design, the illustration will take significantly more time to custom detail, then can be given away for FREE on-line. For example, when you draw shutters, they should be 1/2 the width of the window. A shutter at a radius window, should have the same radius. They should look like they can actually close. It's the little details that make the difference between just making the house look better and real architectural design. The book "Get Your House Right," by Maryanne Cusato is a good resource for remodelers. I think that it's great that people use your low cost service for simple home solutions, but your service is not appropriate for all styles and price points of homes.
5 Likes    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 7:18PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
The drawings are conceptual not architectural full scale drawings event bough I can do them to scale , but not on this plat form unless someone specifically as for plans and pays for them . This is all they get for free . I don, t do free drawings even for my clients who pay much more than I offers on houzz . If something is off it,s oh well it's free in some cases to help houzzer move on this is all unbillable time when they get a free drawing . Not all things can be learned in a book practical theory without actual hands on building experience is just that theory and someone's advice . We have in the 30 years building had many architects plans and drawings with so many mistakes, we have had to stop the jobs until it was corrected and the one usually who catches the mistakes is the remodelers . Thankfully we have a minimum building code but guess what that s the problem there aren't any architects adding extra joist or footers to make things better on there own because of this minimum code . It's usually the remodelers who by hands on experience catches those errors an adds what's needed. Every designer architect should be required after graduating to do some sort of internship doing actual hands on building to get a real world feel for what books can't teach you . I just don't draw I actually hands on build everything for the last 30 plus years . I have worked with both designers that never so much as put a nail in the wall let alone know what was behind the wall but is directing a large project . When the cabinets don't fit the space because the walls are not leveled we have to stop the job to fix the walls . Scale is important and that's why I design and build to make sure it's done write the first time.
1 Like    Bookmark   August 31, 2013 at 8:16PM
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Alex
Beautiful house by the way. If it were me, I would install a black door on a flagstone base and flank by two modern topiary bushes. However, I note that you would like a porch - given its victorian aesthetics, I would suggest the attached picture of a porch - try and match the brick and tiles as closely as possble and this should fit in with the style of this victorian cottage.

PS. I am a Brit, this property matches many I have worked on
26 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 4:58AM
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bevballew
I liked Anna dee suggestions.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 5:21AM
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lavc
Yes , the little porch above [ by ALEX ] is what I think would be beautiful and proper ! Maybe with a black roof ?
    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 5:23AM
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Amy Canary
Hire an architect who is experienced with homes from your region and period.
2 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 7:53AM
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Revolutionary Gardens
Everyone sees the cost of hiring a design professional. People who know how to get the most bang for their buck see the VALUE in hiring a design professional. What I think gets lost on here is the process that a designer takes to get from where we are to where we need to be. Design starts with an in-depth conversation with the homeowner about wants and needs, how they will live in the space... basically it's my job to get you to tell me the story you've written in your head about how you and your family will live. If I put pen to paper or finger to mouse before I know that, I'm projecting myself onto your project and that's not what *I* think design is.

As a few folks have already mentioned, there's a lot at play here - historic home, altering spaces, planning commissions - so hire a local pro who knows how to respect what you have and navigate the path to what's possible.

@EverythingBeautiful - "guess what that s the problem there aren't any architects adding extra joist or footers to make things better on there own because of this minimum code" DUDE. Come on, you know that's utter BS. To make that statement is just immature, and this is coming from someone with a wall of toys in his office. My experience (I work with realtors, developers, architects, and design-build firms) is that nowadays, people aren't going straight to the architect. They're getting referred to the architect by their realtor or their builder. In other words, architect who suck end up in other professions because no one wants to work with them.
4 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 9:22AM
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Rina
Ummm, isn't this thread getting hijacked a bit? rc m is likely to call in a professional when he/she has a feeling what he/she might really like to do. This is a discussion, a throwing around of ideas that are meant to be helpful. I would certainly, if I were to contemplate an important change to my house, discuss it either on this forum or with friends with savvy. Then, when I'd clarified my own thoughts, I would call in the professional for further development. Let's get back to the lovely house .... unless, rc m, you have already decided what you want? (PS Love architects. Really.)
7 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 10:58AM
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Nolia Design
Embrace the age and charm of your home, it's stunning. If you trend towards modern decor, I would choose a steel portico and trellis to train vines on, the juxtaposition would be very interesting. If you want to keep it classic, again, I would honor the symmetry, and choose a beautifully detailed wooden door with sidelights, and paint it a nice shiny lacquered gray or black. Classic Urn planters and uplights would add to the drama. For details contact us: inquiries@noliadesign.com
1 Like    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 11:16AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
I agree we have to get what's in clients head and develope a comprehensive artistic plan, encompassing both the wishes of the client and designer . That can't be done in the first reply to any post not even with a drawing but I provide a rendering for the sake of helping houzzers Visualize there thoughts . Our drawings here on houzz are not architeual drawings at all but conceptual weather you verbalize ideas or in a drawing in your first reply to a post are all just conceptual opinions or suggestions without as you say going further into an actual in depth consultation . In regards to my BS statement as you say. What is BS? the fact that the building codes are a minimum or the architect that doesn't add extra supports, footers, braces , headers , in his drawing or even the minimum requirements in his / her drawing, because they have never framed a wall in there life. In my experience we have had our share of set backs because the project will not pass inspection without a header one is ok but multiples are not . That's BS that everyone should go directly to an architect for everything . it does not matter who refers you to an architect or if you go on your own you still wind up in the same place . If it involves structural alterations then you better get one but for cosmetics a builder is fine. My point is simple sorry it went over your head . Everyone in this profession needs some hands on building experience through a internship programs before they ever get there degree . It can hurt only help . Example we have a huge retirement home under major renovation 5 floors simply because the foundation failed, millions to repair and a major inconvenience to the residents who can't play bingo . I am not implying all architects are wrong in any way I have two who work with me and they are on point but both of them have experience in hands on building . Don't think this is the right place for this conversation . You have my email . Be well
2 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 11:55AM
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collettec
rc m, You have a beautiful home. There are so many things to consider with a decision like this, including the inside of the house and what the door would be leading into. I think this is a great forum for getting ideas, but ultimately I think it would help to work with an architect.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 12:03PM
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midrashist
I think some people are reacting to the americanizing look of tacking on something totally irrelevant to a lovely subtle historical looking house. (At first glance it was obviously not american.) I might not have a hissy fit about tacking on a veranda on the back somewhere, but on the front??!! Cultural and historical anathma. i think that's what has tempers up and professional competitive juices flowing. i can be amused by more modern buildings with various things sticking out here and there, but am not at all amused by mass produced glitz added to, and disturbing the coherence of, something timeless that already looks great.
5 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 1:25PM
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Pamela Danner
So far I think Alex is on the right track. To me this house looks gothic revival and I would think that a gothic revival porch with a steeply pitched roof, hexagonal pillars and some fretwork would look period
1 Like    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 1:33PM
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Alex
It's not really gothic revival, its not really detailed enough, it's just a Victorian style consistent with buildings all over the uk. Given the small detailing, I would suggest that this building in particular was built as a rectory and modified slightly over time.
2 Likes    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 1:45PM
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jenanilali
Judge
    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 1:46PM
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bevballew
Anna dee's first picture seems to stick with keeping with the architecture of the place and not adding too much to take away from its look.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 1, 2013 at 3:12PM
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rinqreation
I think there are three options to stay true to the house, but that's just my opinion. One is a small portico/screen hung above the front door (either in glass or rooftile). The second is a full width narrow porch perhaps with a small gable above the door (either done in wood like a pergola or as a addition to the house with rooftile) as seen in the picture.
3 Likes    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 3:06AM
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rinqreation
A pretty 1920s style third option is to move the entry door inward.
This seems the best solution to me, but requires a little sacrifice.
These are dutch examples:
4 Likes    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 3:20AM
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Kathleen
Please check on planning and building permits. My Uncle lives in a English farmhouse and cannot change in any form the outside of his home. Many of the beautiful homes and gardens I have been to in England keep the transition from home and garden simple. You often have a door located close to but not always at the outdoor sitting area. The fun is in the journey! An aged looking patio surface. Climbing vines, mismatched furniture. Varying styles of pots arranged for privacy. Add an umbrella if you need shade. Enjoy your new home.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 4:51AM
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William Feil
definitely agree with "Hudson St Design" I could see the same. The dark trim paint on door adds another nice detail.
    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 8:50AM
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Lynne Mysliwiec
I did a search of google images for english victorian porches brick homes and it came up with a lot of inspiring images. Applied vestibules seem to be fairly popular --
http://www.narratives.co.uk/ImageThumbs/AC070_01/3/AC070_01_Porch_facade_of_Victorian_brick_built_country_house.jpg

Of course, with the gable roof on your home, the gabled suggestions are probably more appropriate. Perhaps with a barrel vault inside the arch to mimic the arched windows?

Alex's suggestion is particularly lovely with the half brick walls -- it looks very appropriate and provides an airlock for inclement days.
4 Likes    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 8:59AM
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Laura Maddox
personally i agree with Alex, it just fits with the rest of the house. If it were mine id also add a flagstone or weathered brick patio and path. But thats me! Good luck
1 Like    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 1:18PM
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cbminteriors
Try oak masters in the uk.
4 Likes    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 2:01PM
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lavc
wow that looks perfect !!!! {@cbmint.}
1 Like    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 2:55PM
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cbminteriors
They have great porches... Oak masters.co.uk
    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 2:59PM
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3 Likes    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 11:10PM
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Paul D'Amico - Period Design
I suggest the following strategy: look at relevant historic examples, thus mid victorian.
Solutions should take into consideration:
•Proportions with property
•Aesthetic compatibility and this includes material.
Decide whether you want a porch or just a portico and bare in mind that in England and Wales if your property is not in a conservation area you will not require planning permission if:

1. Ground area of the porch, measured externally, not to exceed 3 sqm
2. Highest part of the porch not to exceed three metres.
3. No part of the porch to be within two metres of any boundary that fronts a highway.

You should expect a professional to produce proposal drawings.
7 Likes    Bookmark   September 2, 2013 at 11:35PM
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katinahat
a wonderful book every library should have: ELEMENTS OF STYLE --awesome reference for many details: windows, doors, stairs, woodwork, fireplaces etc. through many time periods from renaissance to post modern. great for ideas too, if you want to 'tweak' something on a smaller scale.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 3, 2013 at 12:04AM
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Sustainable Dwellings
What a lovely, stately home! Stick with Everything Beautiful's ideas. They are on the right track here.
    Bookmark   September 3, 2013 at 7:36AM
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William Grey-Bellis Interiors
ALEX is spot on with his suggestion!
1 Like    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 4:06AM
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sunnie2day
My husband is a retired historic building conservation officer (NE Scotland and Gloucester England). He looked at your picture and said the roof for any porch should be a simple forward slant that echoes the house roof. He loves the gable storm porches but for this house (which he agrees was probably a manse in it's first life) the simple forward slant is the closest to maintain the historic aspect of the home.

He said a glass conservatory across the entire front but with the slant roof would look great without being too jarring if you were thinking along that line, but wants to know if your home is listed? A yes would mean the next step no matter what you are hoping for is to check with the council conservation or planning officer.
3 Likes    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 5:59AM
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Travis Robert Renovations
Great house!
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 6:10AM
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finds2flip4
I would google English Manor houses, they have lots of ideas and pictures of what you could do whether big or small.
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 6:45AM
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sclawson
I would be hesitant to obscure any of that beautiful brickwork. I'm assuming you currently enter through the courtyard and to the side? What about jazzing up the courtyard to create a pathway that leads visitors to the entrance and plantings that enhance and even call attention to the wonderful masonry in the building itself.
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 6:47AM
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sunnie2day
@SCLawson (ETA: WHOOPS! meant this to be towards the poster above SCLawson!) - sorry, my fault for the confusion. The house in the OP isn't an 'English manor house', it looks to be a manse (Scottish word for vicarage). Now, the homes at the following image search link, those ARE English manor houses:)
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1024&bih=654&q=english+manor+house&oq=english+manor+house&gs_l=img.3..0l8j0i5l2.1787.7415.0.8007.19.15.0.4.4.0.233.1175.14j0j1.15.0....0...1ac.1.26.img..0.19.1193.lOhEq6eeyW0

You can quickly see the difference with this image search using the term 'English manse or vicarage':
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1024&bih=654&q=english+manse+or+vicarage&oq=english+manse+or+vicarage&gs_l=img.3...1789.10353.0.10689.25.10.0.15.2.0.114.379.9j1.10.0....0...1ac.1.26.img..14.11.314.7YBj43IQRsQ
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 8:11AM
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blkhorse14
I have a limited knowledge of architecture, but from the picture you presented, it lends itself to the British-Victorian Styling. Your choices will, in reality, come down to what you prefer. I would first suggest you do some research on your home and the style to decide if you want to follow the style given or to add a few ideas of your own. Most of the homes I have noticed in this period have porticos (single or two tiered), with a entrance door flush with the front of the building. Steps would either be direct to the entrance or tiered down in a half circle. These porticos would have a pedimented porch with the second tier being supported by Iconic columns. The landscape design of shrubs and driveway and possibly flowering plants would add a softness to this severe design it currently has. Your home is a beautiful design and is worth the correct changes to add to that beauty.
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 11:12AM
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blkhorse14
FYI: The elements of Style ISBN: 0-671-73981-6 (CHECK AMAZON.COM FOR THE BEST PRICES)
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 11:17AM
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marker1
If you wanted to incorporate a porch The Firestone farm house in Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum may provide a classic idea to build upon and update per your tastes One Flicker post http://www.flickr.com/photos/71288712@N00/369445648/in/photostream/ or
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 11:30AM
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shoebunny
Another vote for Alex. North American ideas for North American houses just don't fit. I've seen Alex's ideas on old homes in the UK, including my cousin's. His home was built in the 1600's. The little front porch between the two side windows is perfect.
2 Likes    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 11:31AM
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OnePlan
hi - I just want to say that Alex's image is a lovely porch - but for the shape of this space on this property it will be too tall - if you look at the space above where the door would be to the base of the window above you will see why Sunnie2day's husband and I suggested the shape we did - like the pic I posted at the top of the thread.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 11:44AM
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shoebunny
True.
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 2:58PM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
I'll repost the initial quick drawing . kind of looks like what your talking about doing which was my intention.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 4:10PM
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druesig
I think ALEX is correct in the little porch/covered entry. It is perfect for this house. Good luck!!
1 Like    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 4:47PM
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Pat
This house looks like a Federal design ... most of that type had no elaborate entries or porches. I agree with Hudson Designs for a stoop which has a Georgian column front or Anna Dee's just below that, which allows for vines such as Wisteria or Trumpet Vine to cover the front. Love your house! =)
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 5:29PM
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Paul B. Showers
I think Paul D'Amico was on the right track above with the simple flat roof with columns. The roof should appear rather thick and you could either use a balcony effect with railings above or I've seen period porches with the same flat roof with boxed in copper details above. Another style would be a simple roof supported by iron brackets with iron railings above creating a balcony. It's a very attractive home. Keeping the porch addition simple and well appointed should enhance the home not overwhelm it.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 6:37PM
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katinahat
i take it that an entrance near where the car is, i.e. on the side, is out of the question?
such a shame to 'abort ' the existing facade but if you extend the porch to cover the side windows as well, you will greatly reduce the light in those rooms; and while the glass roofed porch is a great solution for most north american homes it just doesn't seem right on this beautiful home. i would favour a false gable-end smaller porch with an era-appropriate pediment and change the second floor window to a door accessing the new deck . a professional can provide you with several sketches in a short period of time and, when you see one that works for you AND your home, a complete drawing can be prepared. the brick detail is lovely on this elevation--i would be reluctant to mess with it much.
    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 8:59PM
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Victoria
The majority of these suggestions would never be permitted in the UK and are not in keeping with the house. Alex's suggestion is typical of UK but there is not enough room for it. A typical American period porch with columns and balcony on top is not in character, and would not get planning permission. Similar to OnePlan, I suggest a simple canopy, as generally in the UK porches are used to stop you getting wet unlocking or waiting at the door. The link shows an example, they do many different ones. http://www.fineiron.co.uk/new_images/title_images/fineiron-porches-verandas.jpg
3 Likes    Bookmark   September 4, 2013 at 10:36PM
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ilangelo
Beautiful house. I'd go for small glass panes in wrought iron casement - beveled glass, if you can afford it - and a copper roof. If you hang a coach line in the center of the ceiling inside, it'll make a nice outdoor light, as well. Good luck!
    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 4:07AM
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bevballew
What a great and perfect suggestion Victoria. Simple yet elegant and probably not very expensive and does not destroy the original architecture.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 6:10AM
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Alex
I love the iron work in Victoria's post - however, it is much more in keeping with a georgian style not victorian. If the property is listed you would not get permission for this. Plus, I am guessing that, the reason rc m mentioned a porch is that they want an area where they can store shoes, coats and the normal ancillaries associated with family life. The height, pitch and style of a porch such as the one posted previously is easily customised by any architect/building firm.
    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 10:35AM
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Victoria
Actually, if you look at the website and the picture in more detail you'll see the house in question was built in 1862, approx 25 years into the reign of Queen Victoria ;)
2 Likes    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 10:49AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Just a quick 3D
    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 10:50AM
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Alex
The house is victorian, I agree. I was making reference to the ironwork verandah - that is a georgian/regency style
1 Like    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 10:54AM
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blkhorse14
rc m I hope you will post the decision you make. The rule in the US concerning the addition to a historic building is not to 'change' the existing structure, but you may 'add to' a existing structure. If you have limitations in the UK you need to understand what they are; then proceed to research the building style and even its history. The original picture you posted was a little difficult to understand, was there a portico at the opposite side? I hope you will advise all as to the route you plan to follow.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 5, 2013 at 11:28AM
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ourfarmhouse
rc m,

Here are a couple of suggestions for your beautiful home.

The first (sort of) ignores your request for a porch, but shows you how a proper entrance might be on this home.

The second gives you a portico for your guests to stand under as they wait for your splendid hospitality. Both entrances are borrowed from homes in the London area.

I also thought it might be nice to see how landscaping might draw a guest to the front door and soften so much brick and gravel.
17 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    September 5, 2013 at 9:55PM
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rinqreation
ourfarmhouse, those are marvelous!
1 Like    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 2:23AM
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PRO
Paul D'Amico - Period Design
Interesting post from Ourfarmhouse because although historically wrong- the examples are "Georgian", they work well with the facade. Eclecticism goes back a long way in Architecture it's anything modern or post Edwardian I would avoid. I have posted a photo I took of an Edwardian House with a Georgian portico built at the time. Eclecticism has always existed. Harmony can be reached through compatibility of the forms, proportion and materials.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 2:45AM
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Alex
Really like that ourfarmhouse, great CAD work. Possibly a better door surround could be found for the period but I think that gives a lovely welcoming impression and, as long as there is a separate drive, that landscaping is perfect. Would love to see what rc m does in the end.
5 Likes    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 4:42AM
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Belle Chaise
Please hire someone who knows about historic homes. Designers are all very confident in their opinions but your house is very unique.
2 Likes    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 6:30AM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
I believe they are smart people and will consult in the end with the right people.
    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 7:56AM
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Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Wrong drawing.
4 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by rc m    September 6, 2013 at 8:01AM
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Rina
I have been loving the creativity and caring (and even the sniping) in this thread. rc m, how are you feeling about it? (PS I look at your house and think rectory and novels .... how I would love to see inside.)
1 Like    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 9:17AM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Don't know if you like this but where the heck are you going to have your coffee.
    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 12:42PM
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Victoria
We don't do sitting in the front porch in the UK. We are waaaay too reserved to do that, someone might see us.
7 Likes    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 12:45PM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
LOL.
    Bookmark   September 6, 2013 at 12:59PM
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rc m
Thanks so much everyone - this has been great. Sorry for the lack of response - been flat out!!!!

It must be hard for you American guys to work on such old English designs.... The ideas have gradually culminated into what really would look good on the house. Ourfarmhouse - these are absolutely great ideas, and thanks Everything Beautiful for getting the jist and putting the ideas onto the house image - nothing like seeing an actual design on your own home.

We've got an architech working on it, and he's keen on the iron-wrought idea... but we're not sure. Basically toss-up with this and Everything Beautiful's design (2 above). Going with a four-pannel door, but would like to incorporate some glass somewhere! Possibly a panel above with the house name engraved on it??

Victoria - absolutely right...! We don't need to sit outside with the weather.......... say no more! Just wanting something to cover yourself while you're unlocking the door.

We've also done a tour of the local areas, and found a couple of porches - amazing what you find right on your doorstep! Will attach pics shortly...
6 Likes    Bookmark   September 12, 2013 at 12:46PM
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RosemaryR
Can't wait to see the final design and completion. Best of luck.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 12, 2013 at 1:03PM
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PRO
Everything Beautiful Home Designs LLC
Hat's off to you and Good fortune.
1 Like    Bookmark   September 12, 2013 at 1:13PM
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mugsy1703
How about something like this? Since you have to change the window to a door anyway, add an arch for interest.
1 Like    Bookmark   November 17, 2013 at 7:26PM
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