Need help selecting sofa that is scratch proof!
cindinfocus
September 17, 2013 in Design Dilemma
I am on the hunt for a new sofa and really want something scratch proof and stain resistant. We have several four legged beasts and I am tired of keeping every thing covered up. Isn't there any material that can take the abuse?
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abbyjean
Is leather an option? I really do not know how it would work with a cat, but it is all I can think of right now.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 17, 2013 at 8:49PM
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sltheisen
Declawing them front and back is the only way to prevent damage. Leather will show scratches.
10 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 17, 2013 at 9:02PM
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OasisDesign&Remodeling
I spent over 30 years in the retail furniture industry & I can tell you that there unfortunately is nothing that is damage proof from animals.
9 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 17, 2013 at 9:07PM
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Nina Thomson
We have four cats (none declawed) and a large dog, not to mention kids. I'd suggest an ikea sofa with remove able slipcover. Some fabrics will work better than others, we've tried a few. The fuzzy/felted wool cover is great, hides scratches well but is a fur magnet, it also is easy to clean up cat vomit and doesn't seem to stain easily (my toddler likes blueberries). The korndal(?) (they are cotton with a waffle pattern/weave) covers are no good, the cats seem to especially enjoy scratching them and they show every snag. We currently have one of the plain cotton sort of slippery covers in a dark gray and they are holding up well. Cats don't seem especially interested in scratching them and the hair doesn't stick to the fabric much and they wash up great in the washer and dry in the dryer. We have the karlstaad sofa, but I think most of their sofas are slip covered. Good luck!
44 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 17, 2013 at 9:24PM
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cindinfocus
Nina, where do you buy the cotton sort of slippery covers? Or the wooly felt covers?Do they come with the ikea sofas? Or do you order them separately?
2 Likes   September 18, 2013 at 5:07AM
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Kathleen Jamison
For sure NO LEATHER. Olso no to any fabric with loops. Recommend MICRO FIBERs. My trick is to use indoor/outdoor carpet cut and bound to fit over hardwood. It is like a big scratch pad, cats can not tear up but can get the satsfaction and need to scratch.
9 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 5:18AM
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CHRISICOS INTERIORS
Cute cat!!! Consider outdoor fabric. I have specified outdoor materials for many projects without sacrificing comfort and softness.
16 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 5:42AM
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linlac
Many slip covered sofas come in a cotton duck material. Comparable to denim and wears well.
5 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 5:47AM
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bubblyjock
Cats shred anything and everything: when they scratch, they're scenting the fabric, so, the more they scratch, the more everyone else "needs" to scratch there too.

Solution might be to make matching fabric sleeves for the furniture that will droop down and are replaceable once shredded: you could keep them in place with velcro or a staple gun.

Or - get brutal and yell "NO!" and spray with a water bottle, which I find utterly ineffective, but you'll briefly feel better when the cats give you a filthy glare for your unmannerly behaviour, and stalk off, tail in the air giving you the bird...
66 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 6:00AM
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Genevieve
There are none ,everything scratches ,we had a leather chair many years ago and that one went to the curb, I know that this sounds rather cruel but perhaps getting the cats de clawed could help a bit ..
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 7:10AM
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inabunker
Love your cats -especially the dark grey one (he's got cattitude). So, I would suggest any fabric that doesn't have a weave. You can also put those double sided sticky things that prevent them from scratching furniture.
8 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 8:42AM
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Nina Thomson
Ikea sofas....you buy the slip cover separately and can choose from a bunch of different fabrics, each priced a bit differently. They also have just plain white cotton which is the cheapest but I never dared try it what with dog and kids. Another comment mentioned duck cloth....that might be what we have now, it is like a fine denim but has a nice thickness/weight to it. The ikea cover we have is called sivik dark gray. http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/20229068/
5 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 12:08PM
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cindinfocus
I saw that! Thanks for specifying the fabric. I have had natural colored cotton duck from the slipcover company. It isn't very thick and they seem to like it just fine, thank you very much. So it is somewhat scratched. They can also get under it to scratchthe seat , the little sneaks. The good thing is that it can be thrown in the washer. I am getting a new sofa for my house for the first time and it must last for a while! Thanks for all your suggestions! I might look at outdoor fabrics to slipcover, they are a harder finish. I remember a couch my grandmother had back years ago...it felt like scratchy cast iron. They don't make them like that anymore!And she would never let an animal in her home!We also had a leather chair that we gaveto the local man-cave... (basement men's hang out. )
0 Likes   September 18, 2013 at 12:44PM
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cindinfocus
Innabunker, yes Sammy Jr. has lots of cattitude. He tries to rule the roost, but mostly has a lot of complaining to do. Feeding time and he goes berserk. Maybe has to do with being found at Sam's club parking lot in the rain, hungry and wet. He's still not over it!
6 Likes   September 18, 2013 at 12:49PM
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Susan Cz
The cats won't use a scratch post at all? how about rubbing cat nip on it? Having pets makes it a challenge that's for sure, trust me I have 4.
6 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 2:21PM
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Emily Hurley
I too have gone the Ikea route and replace the slipcovers when they get torn. We have trimmed claws, sprayed with water, provided a scratching post and LOTS of positive reinforcement. They've gotten better about it, but haven't quit entirely. I've decided I can't buy a nice couch again until they are gone. :/
6 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 2:32PM
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Chris Haines
I have some luck with the nails covers for two of my cats, You can get them in all colors at the pet store. One cat is mental challenged and if de clawed, could not get around. Micro fiber is pretty good, cover up where they scratch with other fabric for scratching. Cat hair is my gripe, I have a brown sofa and now two white cats. ugh! 4 cats for me is too many but tell my husband that.
4 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 2:38PM
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kadodi
Pet owners should not consider declawing a routine prevention for unwanted scratching. Declawing can actually lead to an entirely different set of behavior problems that may be worse than shredding the couch.

People think that declawing is a simple surgery that removes a cat's nails—the equivalent of having your fingernails trimmed. Sadly, this is far from the truth. Declawing traditionally involves the amputation of the last bone of each toe. If performed on a human being, it would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

The standard method of declawing is amputating with a scalpel or guillotine clipper. The wounds are closed with stitches or surgical glue, and the feet are bandaged. Another method is laser surgery, in which a small, intense beam of light cuts through tissue by heating and vaporizing it. However, it's still the amputation of the last toe bone of the cat and carries with it the same long-term risks of lameness and behavioral problems as does declawing with scalpels or clippers.
151 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 2:50PM
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judehat
Cotton duck is indestructible as it is such a tight weave. My main sofa is 10 years old and my 2 cats have been unable to damage it. It's held up really well.
10 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 4:58PM
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Sustainable Dwellings
That shark cloth that is impenetrable.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 5:06PM
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rouxb
As someone said-microfiber. Ultrasuede is both easy clean and cats are not as attracted to it. Anything woven is an attraction and the looser the weave, the bigger the attraction.

As for de-clawing-ABSOLUTELY NOT!
53 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 5:24PM
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solraven
I have two cats, and since the one that scratches the most, won't let me trim her nails, I stopped trimming both of them. I have four sofas (not all in one room :) They like the microfiber sofas the least, but what seemed to really curb their enthusiasm was when I tried the "Ultimate Cat Scratching Post". It's the first one I ever bought and the only one that seemed tall enough, and stable enough. At first I put it near the sofas, then moved it into a corner.

They both love it! It's their favorite thing to scratch on. Imagine that? Now I just need to figure out how to make it more attractive. :)

http://www.amazon.com/SmartCat-3832-Ultimate-Scratching-Post/dp/B000634MH8
18 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 6:32PM
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colonialgp
I've got the perfect fabric on a chair in my home. Our cats scratch it but it leaves no marks. It's Crypton and is easy to clean as well. Cats and chair have been getting along beautifully together for over 7 years.

Check out their website: http://www.cryptonfabric.com/
8 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 6:37PM
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colonialgp
Oh, and also check out spray catnip. Works like a charm.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 6:38PM
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armygirl1987
Microfiber. My first one was in 2004 and this current one that I have owned since 2009. I thought the lady from furniture store was bsing me but my cat has never been able to put a hole in mine since I have had it and I do not own a cat scratcher in the house.
6 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 7:03PM
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lefty47
HI -- No , there is no cat proof furniture ! Just get or make some cat condos scratching posts and rub some cat nip on them . The cats will prefer them to the sofa . It may take a few little swats with a newspaper or a rattle of a pop can with some dried beans or some small stones inside to scare them away if they come after the sofa again . Or a few squirts from a spray bottle or water pistol but please don't do any de -clawing , that is so cruel .
9 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 7:55PM
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brdnrd
Cats sometimes scratch to define their territory. Since you have more than one cat, this might be the case. Combining a few tempting new scratch posts, and spraying the cats with water when they do scratch, rewarding them with treats when they use the post, and good old cat nip, should help a lot. Just make sure the cats don't see you spray them.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 18, 2013 at 8:14PM
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lkm316
Please do not declaw your babies. My husband and I have done cat rescue on our own for the last 25 years. We are owned by 14 inside kitties that we were either unable to find a home for or just got too attached to and could not part with them. We have maintained that number most of our years in rescue. We have been able to TRAIN all but two to a sisal scratching post. The trick is to say one word ("NO") take them to the scratching post, rub their paws in a scratching motion while lavishing praise on them. Catnip and Filaway on the post also help. If they only scratch in one place try putting the post there. Sometimes they prefer the post laid on it's side. We learned the hard way that declawing can change a cat's personality drastically. Four years ago we had two very hard to train kitties declawed. One did fine with it, the other was a disaster. Gracie was eighteen months old when we had her declawed. After that she fought with everyone and refused to urinate in the litter pan. She urinated all over the house. Of course we felt very guilty and tried everything from vet visits, medication,
confining her in a small room alone to retrain and anything and everything we could find on the internet. Nothing worked. After living with all the disharmony and clean up for almost two years we decided to have what was once our sweet baby euthanized. To this day we can hardly speak of it. So I beg you, do not declaw. Do the research. Be persistent with training, it may take over a year. Good luck with your kitties.
47 Likes   September 18, 2013 at 8:15PM
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condomary
I agree with Kadodi. I have 2 cats with all their claws and neither one scratches furniture. I have had them since they were babies. They have a cat condo with lots of area for their stretching and "sharpening" their nails. They also have a cat lounger that has Berber carpet on it which they love. See my post in where do your pets sleep with pics. While neither of these items are a decorators delight it is my choice to have cats in my family so think it is my responsibility to provide them a means to carry our their natural instincts.
26 Likes   September 18, 2013 at 8:21PM
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whaleeyex2
I have three new couches (1 leather) and three cats. They scratch for two reasons. Territory and attention. A new piece of furniture smells funny to them and creates anxiety. They need to mark it to claim it as safe and as theirs.
I have two sided tape from a pet shop I put on. Iplace their scratching post at the corner and a spray water bottle filled with water. If I see them scratch the furniture I spritz them.
After about two weeks their marking slows down and eventually stops. My cats are outdoor cats as they are wild and would terrorize my furniture if they stayed in all the time.
I chalk it up to love of my cats and just deal with the furniture issue as best I can. Like you, I don't want to cover up anything. It's my house, too.
5 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 4:13AM
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Ginny Reames
As lots of folks say, only way is to declaw front paws but you cannot do that to a grown cat, no reputable vet would declaw front and back or declaw any cat past the tiny kitten stage. The two sided tape is called sticky paws and is clear you can use it on any part they are drawn to. Once they get used to it being there you can usually remove it and they will still avoid the area. They also make this stuff called bitter yuck that you could saturate cotton balls and put it near any areas they are drawn to. I've had mixed success with that. I agree Microfiber slip cloth furniture is best. I have Mitchell -gold slipcovered microfiber and its also so nice to be able to throw it in the washer. Spot cleans like a dream.....As there is also the barf issue as well. Its the only way I could have off white sofas! Also, I agree that putting cardboard scratchers loaded with catnip works great.
6 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 5:23AM
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dbpoole
PLEASE never declaw! Most people don't realize that this is really amputating the toe up to the first knuckle!! And then they wonder why the cat develops litter box or other behavior problems... My cats rarely bother our leather... They go for a sofa that is upholstered with an embroidered fabric. I find that if I simply trim their claws every week or two I have few problems. When I do see one of our two try to claw furniture i scoop the offender up and do a quick claw check.... Always find that it's time for a trim!
26 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 5:50AM
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Genevieve
At this point getting slipcovers will not only protect your furniture but it will also keep it pet's hair free ,when you have company just remove the slip covers for your guest ,they will appreciate you even more for not going home with their clothes covered with them.
As far is de clawing goes not only it is a mutilation but its also very expensive , for that price just as well get a new sofa and keep your pets claws trimmed .
2 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 6:04AM
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cindinfocus
I will not declaw! I have a claw bear that they have really worked over as you can see in the picture. My furniture is always covered for scratches and hairball barf. I agree that they sometimes scratch in rebellion. I've had one that looked me in the eye while he aggressively scratched the heck out of a beautiful wingback chair, while I was yelling at him and couldn't reach him. I have a great friend who is a dog trainer. She tries to keep her dogs off of her furniture. She says the best she can do is keep them off while she is in the room! When she approaches the den, she hears dog feet hit the floor and fake innocent expressions greet her. :o. I also included a picture of the couch protectors! She guards the couch from hairball barf! But when shes gone my little quilts work too.
11 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 6:23AM
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Snaggy
Don't even THINK about De-clawing the cats !!!! scratching post s or shout no and use a water spray !!
I do the NO thing and it works !
15 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 6:35AM
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Studio M Interior Design
I would recommend getting a few slipcovers made. You can get them in a linen or cotton so that you can easily remove and wash. Maybe even some different colors or patterns to add some variety to your living room design. Otherwise, I usually just tuck in some blankets (I found a faux fur throw at TJ Maxx that works great and looks awesome) and then just throw some pillows to make it look put together.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 7:47AM
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lovemcm
Pet sitter and multiple pet owner here. Forget leather. Even if they do not intentionally scratch, it will get holes just from their jumping up and down. Do NOT use double-sticky tape on leather, either. We tried that, and when we removed it, some of the adhesive remained on the leather, and anything that would remove it looked as bad on the leather as the adhesive. Finding a scratching post they like can be a trial-and-error operation. Spraying it with catnip or Feliway spray can help. Also try No-Scratch spray on places you DON'T want them to scratch. Slipcovers or other types of covers (pet blankets) can also help, although it may be difficult to find those which complement your style. We like modern design, so slipcovers don't work for us. I echo those who recommend microfiber/ultrasuede. It's pretty bomb-proof and the cats don't seem to care for it. It will grab pet hair, but we just vacuum it right off.

We do clip our cats' nails, front and back, but agree that surgical de-clawing is cruel and can cause more problems than it solves. We had no luck with the little nail caps which glue on. In our experience, they did not stay on long, and have to be replaced monthly or more often as the nail grows anyway. And they are not cheap.

We tell ourselves that, as much as we love elegant decor, having pets is like having kids. They don't care about pretty or expensive. They make messes and ruin things. But we love them so we soldier on.
18 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 7:53AM
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armalitespade
LEATHER. Our kitties love the drapes, but they don't scratch our leather couch. Any accidental scratches from launching off the couch or from my own nails or jewelry come out with buffing using either an oil or good quality leather conditioning wipes. Also, look into Soft Claws. They are plastic caps that you put on their claws. They give you the benefits of declawing without having to such a terrible thing to the kitties you love. They have been a life saver! http://www.softclaws.com/index.php?pet=cat
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 8:13AM
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Anna Harper
One thing that worked, over time with my cat was conditioning. You have to teach them that the sofa is not a good place to mark their territory and give them places that are. Each time he would use the sofa I would walk over and gently put my hands around his front paws as if I was holding his hand, not tight at all. I would tell him no firmly and take him to the scratch post. It took awhile and sometimes he would go back to old habits, but for the most part it worked and my sofa had no noticeable wear.
4 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 8:26AM
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nar8
Your not going to believe this......but, CHENILLE (with a cotton or wool blend)! I have 2 cats and they have used my living room couch for 3 years as a scratching post! Daily!!! There is not one rip, tear or hole on it; nor is it frayed anywhere! It's been a life saver! Good luck!
5 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 8:50AM
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Laura Haynes
We used sofa covers and double-sided tape to deter scratching. Once they got over the need to scratch, we were able to remove the tape and the covers. We splurged on the covers and they are very nice because every once in a blue moon though, Rusty likes to give a demonstration of exactly what he's carrying around for defense from stuffed mice and feather boas.
4 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 8:54AM
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12beth12
Hi, We have four cats, none declawed. We have found that if your cats claws are clipped on a regular basis (really not hard to do) and they are provided a really good scratching post in a room where you both spend a lot of time (they love the kind wrapped in rope) they will not scratch the furniture, ever. Really. If their nails get caught on something or they put out their little paw to scratch, we know we have let their nails get too long. We have a micro fiber/suede couch and it has held up well.
5 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 8:59AM
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donnatu
My cats don't bother my leather, they don't even want to sit on it. Very good quality leather won't show the odd scratch anyway.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 9:07AM
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Inspired Interiors
Hi, definately stay away from leather! I have a micro suede couch and that seems to do pretty well with my 2 cats. Hope this helps!
1 Like   September 19, 2013 at 11:34AM
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stripp
I just wanted to thank you for stepping up for the animal !!! Thank you being a sweet and kind hearted person and thinking of the animal before design...which I know is hard...I have many furry kids at home. They take priority over fashion and design and I wouldn't have it any other way. Thank you for being a voice of reason : )
6 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 11:59AM
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rouxb
Saran Wrap around the base will discourage them until you get squared away.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 1:18PM
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La Lune Collection
@Bubblyjock - you're funny!
1 Like   September 19, 2013 at 3:20PM
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RC Cabinets & Closets
The only chose is an upholstery grade of Ultra Suede, used in yachts, Lear Jets, and Cadillacs. It is a polyester felted material that is mildew proof, stain proof, cleanable with a damp cloth, fade proof and is super durable that it resists damage even from metal nails. I design cabinets and any time I create a window seat in a home office with animals around and under a bright window I recommend Ultra Suede for it's long term durability. It is around $95. a yard, a little pricy, but once upholstered on a quality sofa, it will last over 20 years. Plus it comes in gorgeous pure colors, not too many prints though. The cats will be the decorative element!
9 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 3:42PM
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forann5
my daughter has pads that she puts on floor in front of couch so if they step on them, it sets off a blaring alarm. This and double-sided carpet tape are only things I've seen deter them. And yes, my new Natuzzi leather sofa isn't scratch-proof, so I'll keep looking for solutions, but I'll never de-claw. I love my furry babies!
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 6:28PM
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forann5
Ikm316--you are SO right!! De-clawing isn't the answer.
5 Likes   September 19, 2013 at 6:33PM
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Veronica Lawrence Interior Design
Micro Suede will be a great option. There are more fibers per sq inch so it's difficult for claws to penetrate. Leather is not a good option - my cat has made many tears in my leather office chair.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 6:34PM
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marci4
We have a Reese sofa and a Quinn chair from Room and Board, and (knock wood) we have managed to keep the beasties from destroying both pieces. We do keep towels on the seat cushions of the sofa, because there are buttons on the upholstery and the kitties find them irresistible. Aside from that, we keep alternative scratching options nearby--a post and multiple pads. The boy cat seems to prefer sharpening on carpet, so we provide him with carpet samples to satisfy his urge to scratch. We also use a Feliway Comfort Zone Diffuser. The pheremone is kind of pricey, but it seems to work. Keeping their claws trimmed also helps cut down on damage when they do try to scratch

It takes some work, but it is possible for your furniture and kitties to peacefully co-exist. And they do class up the joint...
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 7:54PM
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CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
I spray my cat with water when they touch the furniture. I reward when they use the post. Its very quick method of training them.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 19, 2013 at 7:56PM
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tammytimamy
I think it depends on the cat. I have a friend who has two cats who don't go near her leather sofa, yet would scratch a fabric one. I have a heavy chenille sofa, and my cat has never scratched it, even though I would think it probably looks quite scratchable due to it's squared off arms! He scratches the linen basket instead! I think though if he did scratch the sofa, it would not show too much until after quite a long time as it's such a good heavy fabric. The dog lies on it all the time and jumps on it when he's in his mental Border Collie mood, and it still looks pretty good after five years.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 20, 2013 at 8:54AM
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cindinfocus
I'm going to have my husband build a cat condo/loafing shelf system and cover it with carpet. We used to have a multiple shelf system on a pole that had carpet on it. They shredded it after 2 years. Walmart had it for $35. but I can't find them anymore.
0 Likes   September 20, 2013 at 10:19AM
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rouxb
My two cats destroyed my last sofa. I wasn't ready to replace it, fearing they would do the same to a new one, so I covered it with a slipcover. They put holes in the slipcover but did not really scratch it. When I removed the slipcover they went back to their old bad behavior. I got a new-to-me-hand-me-over ultra suede sofa from a friend (who has cats) and my cats don't scratch it all. I was nervous they would go to extreme kitty "this is mine" behavior but nothing, knock on wood.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 20, 2013 at 3:18PM
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Susan Cz
Cat Counseling 101.....Lol
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 20, 2013 at 3:49PM
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timkii
Hi, I haven't read all the comments, but I can assure you that it IS possible to have a sofa that is 100% scratch proof! We have 4 very active orientals, who also like to play hide and seek in the sofa ;) They are sometimes even sharpening their nails to it! After 5 years there is NOT ONE scratch visible on the sofa. This fabric is a miracle. Even red wine and other foods have been spilled on it and you can just wipe it with a wet cloth and everything disappears... It is some kind of synthetic suede... If you are still looking, I can look into it further to get you the correct type! Don't go for leather, I have leather chairs at the table and they are full of holes and scratches ;)
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 21, 2013 at 11:36PM
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ndbtdr
Other cat owners have given excellent suggestions to change the cats' behaviors (then the furniture won't be a question). I won't reiterate all the great ideas, just wanted to add one more vote for the two-sided tape as I read in one comment. That eliminates scratching where it's placed. Then train them on the posts and cardboard scratchers and you've given them a replacement. Those furried friends are worth it!
0 Likes   September 22, 2013 at 12:09AM
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duneya
If you go online to someplace like Drs Foster & Smith, or into a large petstore like Petsmart, you will find these little silicone (?) or rubber nail covers that you can glue onto each of the cats claws so they are unable to ruin the furniture. Beyond that, I would go with something like a dark leather
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 1:38AM
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ccboyne
Microfiber. It's the only couch my cat hasn't scratched. It also cleans up easily.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 2:23AM
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marique
I have two cats and all the upholstery in my house shows claw damage except the faux suede. Cat hair also doesn't stick to it as much and it can easily be brushed clean. You could also invest in a scratch post made even more attractive to cats by spraying it with cat feromones available from your vet.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 2:37AM
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sweetpoppi
Solution!!!
My cat scratches on everything! And she ruined my leather sofa and chairs. I bought a 2nd hand sofa that has done really well and is strong but I also bought clear PVC from Ace home depot cut it into squares and put it on the corners, I used upholstery tacks the curly ones that don't damage the sofa. I then bought cardboard cat scratchers and attached them to the wall Velcro or small nails will do and I give her 1/2 a treat when she scatches on the cardboard . This has worked really well,sometimes she forgets but all in all all good results. The cardboard cat scratchers placed on the Walls is much better than those horrible carpet ones, is they do prefer carpet you can take a square sample and place it on a frame on the wall...make sure it's sturdy though, if it falls on them they won't go back.
Good luck!
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 3:01AM
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sheils29
My two use their scratching pole and sometimes the carpet. They have damaged my leather sofa but that's when they chase each other. Please don't remove your cats' claws, that's so cruel. Cats like to sharpen their claws, it's purely an instinct. I clip the sharp tips off once a fortnight and they don't mind a bit. If you are an animal lover you put up with your pets' bad habits. Let's face it, humans are far worse.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 4:40AM
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sharonanable
I have one "pet" couch which my cats love to scratch on the corners and my dog lays on. My "human" couch and love seat is microfiber. It does have snag holes in it now after 5 years but has held up better. I find draping decorative blankets over an arm helps as the claws sink into the fabric not the couch and can be easily washed when needed.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 4:41AM
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cigany
My microfiber couch has held up well where other couches have not. Fur comes off easily too.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:09AM
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oysterpointstudio
Double sided tape, sold in pet stores, has been a great discovery for us .It is clear and doesn't seem to leave a residue. I have put the tape down the corners (the most frequent targets) of any new piece of upholstered furniture that has come into the house. I keep it there for a few months and my cat has learned to leave them alone. She has a scratching pad of her own. I'm not always home to "say No and spray water' and my dog goes crazy and gets in the act if I do. Poor cat. I've had lovely cats all my adult life and this seems to be the most affective way to save my furniture without turning the house into a cattery. Good luck!
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:20AM
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cruciangold
Microfiber material, being diligent about keeping their nails trimmed ( no sharp points) and a variety of different scratching posts ( one sisal, one carpet covered and two flat cardboard) have saved our furniture.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:56AM
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sumjoy
My 4 cats have destroyed my microfibre/suede. The've got scratch pads, too.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:09AM
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n247080
ahem. You need to provide more options for your cats to use for their nails. And you need to train them to "want" to use those options. I have always had cats with minimal moments of using furniture as a scratching post. (your cats are beautiful btw) During the training period....1. TONS of praise for using the correct scratching post. Ignore scratching of furniture with no drama. Simply and gently pick the cat up and re direct to the scratching post where they are lavished with praise if they use it. Sometimes I put a small tempting toy on the top of the post and rub it down with catnip. 2. Place the scratching post right next to the place you don't want them to use. It blocks them and they get used to the post instead. refer back to #1. Eventually you can move the post further and further away until it's where you feel comfortable having a scratching post. I have 3 cats and they all like different types of scratching material. (flat cardboard with replaceable liner, post with rug, post with rope) I also have them throughout the house in 3 different rooms. They get used aggressively and are replaced frequently. 3. Wait to get new furniture until you have your cats at least semi trained to using scratching posts. And in a worst case, enjoy the cats. You can always get new furniture. You can't replace the individual qualities of the cats. ;0)
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:09AM
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Isabella Garrucho Fine Art
First off declawing an ADULT cat should NEVER be done!!!! Declawing a cat both front and back is animal cruelty! There are to many options available:

1. Soft Paws (silicone nail covers)
2.Clip your cats nails regularly
3.Scratching pads and posts sprayed with cat nip

Buy a spray bottle fill it with water when the cat scratches any surface you don't want it to... a quick squirt and in a very short time the cat will no longer scratch your personal items. Reward the cat with a treat when it scratches the post or pad.

Cats can be trained just like a dog.
7 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:20AM
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litehearted
HAVE THIS QUESTION COVERED!

Yes, you should provide alternate scratching posts/mats etc., and it helps to have a spray bottle of water handy to emphasize that certain areas are off limits.

However, cats will be cats and rather than spend the rest of your time yelling "no", or considering declawing, putting up with double sided tape, etc. just buy furniture in the right fabric.

1) Do not buy Leather, unless you want the super distressed look.

2) Do buy POLYESTER. I don't know why Oasis Design doesn't know this, but strong Polyester is virtually indestructible. Veronica Lawrence is right, MICRO SUEDE is a good second choice, but will snag and pull if it gets a lot of abuse.

I purchased a Chaise that is supposed to look like Linen, but is in fact Polyester. My two cats are all over it, all the time, especially our four month old kitten. Over the past two months, she has clawed her way up and down that chaise, scrambling in a frenetic pace in crazy kitten play, with her razor sharp baby claws, and the polyester fabric has held up.

Polyester is smooth, and not unpleasant to sit on. Visit a few furniture stores and check it out. I purchased this particular chaise at HomeSense, very inexpensively. At the moment we are shopping for a new sofa, and I'm finding that quite a lot of sofas are available in various Polyester fabrics. You'll want a darker colour - our kitten matches the chaise, but I put a cover on the seat otherwise it's covered in the older black cat's tufts of fur.

The only damage that is showing on the chaise, is where kitten claws have pulled at the actual sewn thread lines {where seams meet}, not the fabric itself, if that makes sense.

Good luck! Don't worry, there is hope. :)
5 Likes   September 22, 2013 at 6:23AM
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JAC Frances
As a cat owner for most of my life, the answer is not a piece of furniture that can take "abuse". Teach you cat to respect your home. From the time a cat enters a home, it's shown a scratching post, a litter box, food dishes and what not to do. My furniture doesn't not have scratch marks, neither should yours.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:26AM
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Mary Fyock
Microfiber fabric comes in various grades of thickness. When shopping, pinch the fabric to test the thickness. Then unzip the cushion to check it is all fabric, and not a thin fabric with a backing. Microfiber is what it is, fiber so tightly woven that even pet hair can't get into the fiber. You just wipe it off. And little needle nails have a difficult time grabbing on!
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:37AM
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Kitty Poundstone
We have had great success protecting our furniture with a very simple combination of 1) an attractive-to-cats scratching post made by SmartCat (the cats love the sisal material, and it is incredibly durable - not a bad design either) + 2) clear contact paper adhered to the back corners of our sofas only (a long strip maybe 8-10 inches that is wrapped around the corners and goes from top to bottom) + 3) regular nail trimming (protects the humans, too). We have not had to do any special training for our cats, beyond an occasional loud "NO" if they scratch something they're not supposed to. In our experience, as long as cats have a desirable place to scratch - and they need to scratch to stay healthy - they will leave everything else alone. People who suggest declawing are not informed, and I'm glad so many other people have posted on the dangers of declawing. There are super easy steps like the ones we have taken that are highly effective at helping humans and cats live together happily without costly property destruction.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:39AM
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johsmi
My Mom's cat loved clawing one of her leather chairs so leather is not a answer. They do sell nail covers in wonderful colors for cat claws. You put them on with a crazy glue type adhesive. My daughter in law who is a vet uses them on their cat. She could declaw the cat but chooses not to.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:47AM
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litehearted
BTW -- I have the SmartCat Ultimate Scratching Post as well, and the kitten loves it.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:01AM
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cyanco
I "second" what Nina Thomson had to say about the Ikea sofas. We have a Karlstad model with a white (duck-type cotton cover). If the cats do scratch it and leave marks, we simply run our own fingernails over the area and the cat claw holes disappear. If we make human spills, we can throw the cover into the washing machine (bleach if needed) and it becomes brand new. We had this same type of fabric on Ikea dining chairs for years that the cats used as their scratching post - no damage at all, just remove/wash/put back in place (they were also white).
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:04AM
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PRO
Tamara Heather Interior Design, LLC
I wrote a recent blog post on cat-friendly design choices here: http://designcarolinas.com/secrets-to-pet-friendly-design
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:09AM
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mellocke
I have 5 cats and a microfiber couch for 15 years, and they don't bother it. Bought leather for another room, and there are scratches on it. They love scratching on the rugs and staircase : )
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:12AM
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steelwillow
Try Soft Claws, they are cute claw covers, come in colors. Our cat was destroying our leather recliners, didn't touch our micosoft sofa. You and your cat wall love them. Google Soft Claws.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:14AM
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Stacy Tintocalis
One more vote for micro suede. My two cats have damaged my faux-leather sofa by jumping on it and sinking in their claws. They've damaged a fabric sofa by scratching it. But our micro suede ottoman has survived for three years without a scratch and doesn't seem to attract cat hair.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:25AM
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Phyllis Hambelton
My sofa and loveseat have not been bothered by scratching. The material looks like suede but I feel it must be something else. Anyway, why would anyone be so cruel as to declaw? Are you all so lazy you don't trim your cat's claws? There are special clippers for cats claws and it is pretty much fool proof.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:30AM
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alrats
Microfiber sofa, Anti Scratch spray and for stains Folex is a miracle working product.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:44AM
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winkoo
nails trimmed and lots of scratchers. Looser upholstery seems to have less appeal than tight, rigid built pieces. 3 inside only cats here and there is little damage. They are rarely home alone for long lengths of time since we are retired. They tend to get less bored when they have company.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:51AM
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suhunt
I have had great success recently with temporary use of those rolls of sticky tape on the usual favorite spots for scratching and it stopped it cold with an older cat who joined our household. He also stopped jumping onto kitchen counters for good after a week of use of a Scat Mat. They make sofa sized ones that might make your cats steer clear of it. When I adopted my two older cats as kittens, I immediately bought one of every kind of scratcher, and sprayed all with cat nip extract, and my rugs with herbal No Scratch. They each had a favorite scratcher type, I donated the rest and those two have never left a mark on any furniture. I think, the sticky tape and a sofa sized Scat Mat might solve your problem. Most of my cats respond well to a water spray, but usually just for the moment, not always in a lasting way. Plus you have to have the consequence/aversion occur each and every time they do damaging stuff.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:55AM
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carolynv
sitheisen set off the right reaction. NEVER DECLAW. Declawing is like cutting your fingers off at the knuckles. barbaric.

Denver has a store The Livable Store http://www.thelivablehomestore.com that is Pet friendly furniture.

The idea of using a slip cover, or outdoor fabric is also great.

I have a Nubuck leather sofa that does not show scratches. I have 2 cats. I have them trained to not scratch but when they run and job on the sofa it does not scratch. If it does I use a damp cloth on the leather and scrub and let it dry. If it is not too deep it looks new-same with spots.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:11AM
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rosebud3
I had a very comfortable microfiber couch many years ago. When I adopted a new kitten I covered it with a blanket and wrapped aluminum foil around the legs. After leaving kitty alone during the day for a week while I was at work.....I took the blanket off on Saturday to wash it...was shocked to discover my Willow was crawling up under the blanket and she had torn chunks of the fabric out of the top of the back of the couch. I have never found another couch as comfortable :(

BUT cats are just as trainable as dogs, people just don't realize it. If you can, look for some kind of wand that you can you put a treat on the end. When kitty goes to the couch lure them away with the treat over to a scratching post and give them the treat. It will take a while but can be done. Do it before you buy a new couch. My cats have always loved the dried fish flakes you can get at Petco. They would love me to death as soon as I picked up the jar.

My cats liked catnip but the spray never attracted them to a post. One thing about a post. Most manufactured ones are too short. For a cat to want to use one, it has to be tall enough so a cat can do a full body stretch against it. My cats have always preferred the carpetted ones over sisal. If you are handy you can make one. An a-frame shape will be more stable. Make sure the base is heavy so it won't tip. About sisal - the sisal you can buy at home stores has oil on it - not good or attractive to cats. If you want to use sisal on a round post make sure it is all natural - and, yes, it is a lot more expensive than what you find at a home store. I found it online.

Good to know about the chenille. I am "catless" right now, but after i move and get another cat i will look for chenille.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:12AM
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rosebud3
Oh, and like someone else said, I was going to suggest outdoor fabric, but let's face it, that's not too comfy for the humans.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:15AM
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suhunt
My cats who used the post always chose the shortest one! Others only like the cardboard ones that lie on the floor and they stand on it while pulling and scratching. They're all so different. Sisal is definitely preferable. None of them ever go near the tall one I bought to redirect the newer adult cat. Depending on the cat, if they use their claws to balance themselves on a leather sofa, you end up with punctures all over. I also have to say that declawing is flat out inhumane and should never, ever be done. Learned the hard way, many years ago.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:18AM
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George Coons
Cast iron or steel ... stone.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:19AM
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cynthia kurk
A great micro fiber is bella or belsire a polyester velvet.It is used on all styles of furniture.I have used it on high end and mid priced pieces. Most furniture stores carry it and it comes in a wide variety of colors. My cats never scratched it , being too smooth . A damp sponge rolls up all hair . Hair can not interweave into this fabric. As a former furniture store owner with cats this has worked best.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:24AM
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katzandroses
Whatever you do, please do not declaw them! Declawing is actually an amputation of part of the "fingers," similar to cutting off the tips of your fingers to the first knuckle.If they ever go outside, they have no way to defend themselves, and even inside the house they use their claws for balancing and other needs. Beauty, whether in clothes or furniture, should not be an excuse for animal suffering. Behavior modification and choosing smooth fabrics like microfiber have always worked for me and my cats.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:33AM
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litehearted
Know thyself, know thy cat(s). Some people are more consistent with discipline, AND every cat responds differently to it.

I know of a couple in my mother's apartment building that have four cats. Each and every day, the couple take turns propping the doors open and allowing the cats 30min of outside time. They will sit in the front garden, which is bordered by two busy roads {and no fence}. The cats are trained to be allowed to roam the garden freely, but are not allowed on the pavement.

I could never achieve that level of cooperation from my cats, knowing my own limitations and their personalities. However, there are two rules that our cats do obey that are the law in our household:
- no cats on the kitchen counters
- good behaviour on the balcony

For those of you who have your cats trained with military precision, I say kudos. Not all of us are able to achieve that level of mastery over our pets, it is often the other way around! Living with animals in the house involves compromise, as does any relationship. We all have our own way of making it work. :)
6 Likes   September 22, 2013 at 8:34AM
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ahnaie
my kitchen has a island counter with 2 bar stools. I put a extra stool just for the cat. I covered it with leopard print velvet and hung feather toys from the high part of the back. He goes there to be high up watching the 3 dogs below and me watching tv in family room (open concept) . With a rubber finger brush whatever hair comes up easy from velvet which is SUPER durable (like on some of the dog beds);and he has scratch pad below on floor. The most important is; I got the long rubber finger brush and brush him 2x day to remove all loose hairs and undercoat. He LOVES to be brushed and literally begs for it. It eliminates most but not all. My couch is a vinyl; very delicate; and he does like to sit on back to look out window. There I have put a throw to protect when he does his landing. I also brush my dogs; even though short hair rat terriers; every day and it helps with flying hair everywhere. I have wood floors and can see all the hair that is shook off when they get up or move around.Another trick for cat is that he does not like pet beds. But if I buy something in a big box and leave it on the floor; he crawls in and spends hours in it and the novelty lasts a week or two and then it"s over and when the next box appears; it starts over again....
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:37AM
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Hafner Fine Carpentry
Please give claw covers a try. Our 15 year old cat adapted to them quite easily when we got a new couch. Yes, there is maintenance involved as their claws actually fall out altogether every 8 weeks or so. You have to monitor weekly and reapply covers. Cost for one cat is running about $25 every 6 months. Much less $$ than a new couch.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:38AM
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rosebud3
By the way, your cats are beautiful. My cat passed in February and I am missing having a cat underfoot.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:40AM
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Mihaela Raileanu
We have applied soft paws to our cat and all furniture is safe now. We take her to the vet every 2 months or so where she gets her nails trimmed and soft paws applied. Best solution for us, you can try!
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:41AM
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nottley
MICROFIBER!!! We bought a chair covered in a microfiber that looks like a sueded leather and there is zero damage. Our cat jumps on the arms and frequently sinks her claws in, but you can't see any evidence. Other than that, we keep throws on the arms of the leather sofa. Canvas is probably tough enough also.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:50AM
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nottley
I want to clarify that my cat never intentially goes after furniture. She has those disposable cardboard scratching pads and uses them. It's only when she's trying to keep her balance on a rolled arm that she digs in. Do NOT declaw your cat. It is very cruel if you research it and they can have terrible complications from the operation.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 8:55AM
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rosebud3
Oh, and your dog is a cutie!
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 9:02AM
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annemoltchanoff
I had a microfiber for 8 years and not one scratch. (But the cat did spray on it - still cleaned up nicely no smell whatsoever, it is like iron) My particular cat does not go after leather at all, but the dog is not allowed on. I am lucky that I have a door that closes the room off when we are gone as the dog is the one that would really trash the new leather sofa. See if there is any way you can close it off while you are not there to supervise. I agree with the pheremones, helped my cat deal with moving and new furniture anxiety more for the spraying. And finally, do not get really textured fabric as that is like a scratching post for the cat, and you can put clear packing tape on the edges, they will not scratch through it but of course it will not work with leather or certain other fabrics, it would have to be a pretty tight weave. Good luck - it is so frustrating to want a great looking house, but then those are those critters we love, dogs, cats and kids....
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 9:09AM
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srck
Micro fiber suede with sticky paws strips on areas they scratch like the corners. It has worked for our scratchers. Just watch where they are going to scratch and put sticky paw tape there. Its clear and doesn't damage furniture.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 10:38AM
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daylilydiva
Check out a product called Soft Claws online. We had four cats who clawed velour, corduroy and leather despite having lots of scratching posts in the house. Soft Claws was the answer.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 11:08AM
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Jan Yatsko
I used Sunbrella (an outdoor fabric) to cover my sofa cushions. The fabric is dense, fade-resistant, machine washable, and water repellant (easy spot clean up). It has been on my sofa for 8-10 years and I live with four cats...no damage at all to the fabric. Keep the calico....they bring good luck!!!!
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 11:31AM
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Katzzmeow
Do not declaw,did that with my last cat,he had behavior problems his whole life ,he was fixed,but sprayed on every thing in sight, even the furniture,I'll take scratching any day.Have 2 kittys now and I use clear tape on the corners of the sofa and chairs,it seems to work,and is hardly noticeable,scotch mailing tape works well.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 11:35AM
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sclawson
Best for stain resistant an durability is a 100% polyester, tightly woven microfiber with Crypton treatment. Hoping this will also help with the cat, though the upolsterer said nothing is guaranteed. Rather than declaw our cat, we have started applying Softpaws to her front claws, available at www.softpaws.com. These are small claw-shaped caps that you apply over the claw. They fall off naturally as the cat periodically sheds the claws. You do have to keep checking for ones that come off, but they are pretty easy to put on, and my cat was completerly used to them in no time. They come in clear and a variety of colors, including rainbow packs! My brown tabby, Maisie, is very dignified, though, so she only wears gold sparkles.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 11:38AM
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sclawson
I forgot: The Softpaws will not stop the cat from doing its natural scratching, stretching and marking behaviors, but it will keep their claws from snagging furniture and scratching floors and woodwork.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 11:40AM
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rawketgrl
1 Like   September 22, 2013 at 12:00PM
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Beth Sibler
Flexsteel furniture has a fabric called KASHMIRA. I have it and you cannot scratch it with anything. I have a cat. You can write on it with a pen and it washes off. Cannot stain it with red wine either. It feels wonderful and has a texture and feel like suede. I am not kidding. Do yourself a favor and check it out.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 12:51PM
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maryrw
I have a leather couch now. Before I had the whole leather set including loveseat and chair. My cat scratched the back of the loveseat so badly that I had to throw it out. As an option to declawing, I get my cat soft claws or soft paws. I take her to the vet every 8 weeks and they trim her nails and put on soft claws. Soft claws are plastic nail tips that go over her real nails. With them on, when she scratches at something it does no damage at all. They are about $20 but worth it.I had looked into getting her declawed but it was too traumatic and I just couldn't do it. Been using soft claws for a year now and they are a lifesaver to my furniture.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 1:19PM
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bohomor20
CHENILLE is definitely the answer with cats (I have three, two declawed/one not but very faithful to his scratchpost from the day I showed him how to use it. None of my cats has even tried to scratch the chenille couch and as for jumping up on things (i.e., kitchen table) a water bottle works wonders to break the habit-after a few times they run as soon as you show the bottle. On a few occasions one of their claws may get stuck in the chenille, but when they pull it out - no tears, rips or marks.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 3:14PM
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cindinfocus
Litehearted, you have some cuties! I also really like your colorful pillow! Sclawson, very regal, must you bow when entering the room? ;)
0 Likes   September 22, 2013 at 3:49PM
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Victoria Pierce
My cats don't touch the micro fiber sofa... the killed my cotton one.. Micro fiber really works..
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 4:26PM
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sumjoy
I just bought a Sentry Calming Collar at PetSmart yesterday. I put it on my cat with the worst behavior this morning and already he's calmed down. He comes to me when I call him and even fell asleep at my feet on the recliner. It's supposed to help with innappropriate marking, excessive meowing and scratching.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:20PM
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housewren
My cat does not scratch a slip cover made of boat canvas. I pre-washed and dried it. I think that because it was made a little loose it is not a very satisfactory scratch post. My cat prefers wood corners. I use clear packing tape over his efforts and provide him with a cardboard chaise lounge made for cats. He hangs out it and the chaise lounge is placed where I hangout working.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:40PM
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2manyhorses
PLEASE, DO NOT declaw, it is the equivalent of cutting off your fingers at the first knuckle! It is extremely painful and usually results in serious emotional issues (I've worked at several shelters/rescues and saw it many times).
Clawing is a natural and pleasurable behavior for cats...in the wild it is necessary for keeping their claws sharp to snag predators.
I've had great success with Microfiber. Do not get leather, mine think it is the most wonderful indoor scratcher and will seek it out! I've also heard of a fabric called Crypton that is supposed to be superb with animals of all species.
Sounds odd, but have also had success with training cats. Most view cats as untrainable, but that is not always the case. A good scratching post with catnip liberally applied and placed next to the kitty's favorite off limits site (preferably with clear plastic packing tape loosely applied - don't ruin the surface, obviously) is the start. Praise and feed (treats) when he/she uses the scratching post and as the behavior becomes more frequent, slowly start moving the post away from the off-limits furniture and to a place where you would like the scratching post to permanently remain...yes it will need to remain.
Best of luck and thanks for putting your animals' welfare first!
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:43PM
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bizsr
I have a suggestion for getting your cats to use a cat scratcher. My cat turned her nose up at every cat scratcher except the sofa. She is a jealous lady so on a hunch, I sent my cat scratcher to my sister for a week. Her kitties tore into it and marked it up. Sure enough, I brought it back into the house and mine decided she had to "fix" the markings on that sucker. I put it right next to the couch and now she prefers it to the couch.

So if you have a friend who has cats that use their cat scratcher, see if they will break it in for you.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:49PM
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bizsr
PS - I also did the clear plastic tape thing on the furniture. You can potentially use tin foil also. It took several weeks, but she got the hang of it.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 5:50PM
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domesticangel
I have two cats but only one of them scratches furniture. I have had several cats over the years and all have scratched furniture. Your question got me thinking. My cat likes to scratch my fabric couches and my leather couches, however, he never scratches the micro suede seats at my dining table. Curious. I put throw rugs over the arms of my couches, and have found that this deters him. Please don't have your cat declawed, it stops them from exhibiting a natural part of their behaviour and they will suffer mentally because of it. The only sure way to stop cats going near furniture is to use camphor. Moth balls or some chest rubs have it, just put a little on the furniture spots where the cats scratch. Cats hate it. You just have to decide whether you prefer the smell or the scratches. (I tend to put up with scratches).
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:08PM
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safetyshuttle
There are scratch deterrent products on the market that work. I have a leather sofa that my cat attempted to scratch. I purchased a spray product designed to deter this behavior. It Worked! Again, there are such products on the market. Just google it.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:26PM
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fatcatz
I also have had some success with microfiber and microsuede. Also velvet. At one point I sort of made my own slipcover. I selected a nice upholstery fabric, had rectangles cut to fit our sofa and a chair, large enough that it would go from the back of the piece, over the seat. Then a tailor simply hemmed it. It was nicer than the normal beige couch covers you see in catalogs, and was washable. It didn't cover the arms of the sofa. I wanted to keep it very simple and inexpensive so just did a big rectangle.

Also, please DO NOT declaw your cats! As one of the posters above described, it is major surgery, not simply clipping the nails. Often cats never recover from it, and endure physical and psychological pain for the rest of their lives. Many vets now will not even perform the procedure.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:34PM
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synclair
I "third" the Ikea sofa. I have two cats and they destroyed my previous sofa. I replaced it in January 2013 with the ektorp sofa with the white slipcover. Works like a charm. It's so easy to clean--cold water and some OxyClean and it looks like new. I get lots of comments from people who are surprised I got the white cover, but I find it easy because it can be bleached, although I haven't had to use chlorine bleach yet. I've spilled coffee on it myself and it washed right out.

A tip for you if you go this route, buy some of the disposable bed pads they make for children and cover the cushions with them under the slipcover. That saves any stains and potential resulting odors from seeping into the actual cushion, whether from the cats or from you. The reason I like the ones made for children's beds are that the corners have an adhesive. DON'T use puppy pads. I am thinking about buying a second slipcover to make life easier when I need or want to wash the other one. It takes two loads of laundry if i want to wash the whole cover set and so I end up with a naked couch for a few hours.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 6:43PM
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Elizabeth Douglas
According to some of the top Designers, Faux Sued is one of the best fabrics to use. I would not think of de-clawing the cats. I would also get a scratching post with catnip
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:10PM
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n247080
Violetta. One of 3 feral kittens I found living under my deck last winter. As you can see, she's now well behaved, socialized and respects my furniture (not an easy task!) Educate the human on how to communicate limits with their cat, provide appropriate options for scratching and you can have any fabric you want on your sofa.
5 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 7:11PM
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cindinfocus
Her eyes match the sofa! What a beauty!
0 Likes   September 22, 2013 at 7:56PM
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PRO
CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
I would never do leather or vinyl-but rather a chenille and thicker grade Chenille-best fabric with cats. Chenilles are great with pets.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 9:12PM
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jorjagirl
I've always had cats. The way I've gotten my cats Jody, Julius, and Jorge to stop and not scratch the furniture was with the carpet floor mats from my car. I simply placed them near the areas on the side of the sofa and chair where they were scratching and they started using the mats instead. Occasionally, I sprinkled catnip on the mats as a reminder and I haven't had a problem in years. I have also used this solution for other cats that I have rescued. I suggest you try this for at least a week or two to see if it works for you along with a strong verbal NO.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 22, 2013 at 9:35PM
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koran2013
My advise - do not use a carpet-covered scratching post. The cats then are encourage to scratch your rugs. Sisal is best.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 4:59AM
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Vicki D
Mohair and microfiber...avoid anything with a looped fiber. And I love jorjagirl's idea of using a car mat. One of my cats loves to jump through my sunroof (when it's in the garage) and scratch on the floor mats. I'll have to try it out as a treat to my kitties.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 6:50AM
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skfreyca
As a cat lover and a lover of all things home decor, I have a couple of ideas. Please do NOT declaw your beautiful cats! This is akin to chopping off your own fingers at the first knuckle. It can leave permanent nerve damage with resulting pain and it can alter their personality. A cat's natural instinct is to claw; they claw to trim their nails, "mark" their territory, and to stretch their backs. In our home, I have made sure my cats have their own scratching posts and furniture. A cat post with sisal is fabulous for cats; we have some by Purrfect Post and we and our cats love them. They're beautiful and minimalist. If you provide your cats with their own stuff to scratch on, they'll leave your stuff alone. One thing we did when we got new sofas was to put two-sided sticky tape liners just on the corners; this was because the sofas were new and most cats would want to go after them simply for the purpose of putting their scent on them. Cats hate sticky surfaces, so until ours were used to the new furniture (a couple of months), we kept the two-sided strips on the corners. I hope that helps. Thanks for posting the pictures of your cats...they're beautiful!
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 9:20AM
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narge
First of all get a good scratching post and place it near the sofa. Put a little catnip on it and praise the cat each time it's used. A synthetic velvet fabric works very well for sofa covers. Cats can't get their claws into it. It also cleans up very easily.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 9:28AM
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zliceskl
Lynda

Have had many cats. The best fabric by far is microfiber.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 9:35AM
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sjb924
Lazy-Boy has a "leather-look" fabric available that my cat has not been able to destroy yet... he has been caught many times scratching on the corners... it's like a microfiber. Always provide plenty of alternative scratching surfaces... encourage, encourage, encourage. You wouldn't ask your cat not to poop, would you?
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 9:57AM
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cindinfocus
True. Litter boxes are a trained response to poop on the floor!
0 Likes   September 23, 2013 at 10:32AM
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cjmacp
My daughter has 2 cats and a dog. She has a beautiful beige microfiber sectional and it is 7 years old and looks like brand new. The cats will not scratch it and it does not stain at all. I have 2 cats and a leather sofa and love seat. One cat just starting scratching the loveseat and it looks bad. I do not recommend leather.
0 Likes   September 23, 2013 at 10:52AM
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lindak2010
I haven't read all the comments, but I put aluminum foil down on surfaces I want my kitty to avoid. She hates the feel and sound of the foil when she touches it. One time was enough, and she never returned to the same spot.
0 Likes   September 23, 2013 at 11:02AM
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labougresseverte
Dear sindin,,,,, firstly buy a cat tree . Your pet let your sofa alone, end you make them happy .....bye
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 11:27AM
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jorjagirl
Here's my Jody. She's also a Calico and looks a lot like your scratcher. The Orange Tabby is Jorge and the Tuxedo is Julius.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 11:31AM
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2bsmaller
Is your hat a house cat? If yes, have you heard of Soft Claws? They soft silicon claw caps that glue (hypoallergenic) onto the cats claws. The cat retains full function of their claws, but without the damaged furniture. Our cat lives inside, and he's fine with them. In fact, he seems to prance around with them on! Google Soft Claws. :0)
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 12:18PM
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jdehagen
I have placed SEVERAL wireless door bells strategically around furniture and entrances to rooms which I do not want my cats to go. Works 100% of the time!
http://www.harborfreight.com/wireless-driveway-alert-system-93068.html
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 1:16PM
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Urbanxt Design
Wow! The amount of comments this question has attracted goes to show the amount of cat lovers there on this planet. Someone should design a range of cat proof furniture. Indications show a strong market for it. I ended up investing in a pair of genuine leather sofas. I remember bickering over prices with the sales consultant who convinced me not to buy the alternative I.e. bonded leather. The hide I have resists scratchig, perforations heal themselves and they are easy to clean. Biro marks not so much but that applys to any material. I then purchased a sisal rug that seems to attract most of the attention from my cats and holds up well because its easy to steam clean. Hope that helps.I love cats.
6 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 3:18PM
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cindinfocus
Jorjagirl, your Jody could be Sally's sister! She's gorgeous. I also have a soft spot for tuxedos. They seem to be a different type, almost human! I've had three tuxedos, and every one was very close to me. One was a female stray, pregnant, who came to gete before each kitten was born-to softly stroke her belly while she gave birth. I would leave her with her kitten, and 7-10 minutes later, she would come get me again! I sure miss her.
1 Like   September 23, 2013 at 3:45PM
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nottley
Well, this is interesting! Here's a designer who hates microsuede. She said nothing about micofiber. She uses Sunbrella fabrics, which even come in velvets.
http://www.mariakillam.com/should-you-buy-a-sofa-in-microsuede-yay-or-nay/
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 4:55PM
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Brenda
since everyone is posting cat photos ... here is my sweet Killian. she died at the age of 18 earlier this year. not quite over it yet ...
5 Likes   September 23, 2013 at 5:05PM
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Brenda
... and yes, she was a scratcher. the only thing that worked for me was putting a cocco fiber (think that's what they are called) door mat on the inside of my entry. she absolutely loved scratching that thing. wish I had discovered it earlier ... I could have saved more than one sofa.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 5:08PM
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cindinfocus
Sorry, :( She was a beautiful kitty.
2 Likes   September 23, 2013 at 5:27PM
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Rosie Ranger
Ditto on the training. I brought home the cardboard scratching pads from Target. I praised my cat when he clawed them and when he tried clawing the rug, i said no and took him to the scratching pad. He figured it out. Trimming their claws regularly helps as well.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 23, 2013 at 11:07PM
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Anne
We got a "distressed" leather sofa. The cat sometimes makes a mark, but it just blends in. Also agree with the training. I catch my cat scratching where he should not, I pick him up quickly and and take him to one of his scratching posts. I also trim his claws every other week, which keeps them shorter.
3 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 24, 2013 at 12:02AM
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hcorso
Whatever type of furniture you decide on, do not declaw your kitty! If you have problems & trying all the suggestions given here do not work, it's better to give kitty to another loving home than to put him through that! You owe it to him to research (Google it) to see what this cruel surgery entails.
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 24, 2013 at 1:09AM
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tmo2078
My couches are made of a corduroy material and I have had them for about 10 years and my cats have done very little damage to them. I would get this material again in a heartbeat.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 24, 2013 at 4:32AM
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Tim Copas
I think corduroy is the best way to go, I have a leather blend and it has held up Okay as well, but still shows signs of wear. Don't declaw them, cats get great pleasure out of kneading their claws, I have taught mine to not use the furniture as a post, whenever you see that they are wanting to scratch get them immediately and put on a rug and let them have at it, I done this and my cat has never used the furniture, but that rug sure got it share of abuse! Just remember they didn't ask to be boxed up in your house, you brought them in so we just have to deal with it the best we can.
4 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 24, 2013 at 4:52AM
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Tim Copas
These are my buddies ! Both recused from shelters, How did I ever live as long as I did without 'em! Love you guys!
4 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 24, 2013 at 5:40AM
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cindinfocus
Wow they match!
1 Like   September 24, 2013 at 5:47AM
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cindinfocus
Neasmom, two words...little Budda. Thanks to all who have weighed in on this topic. I especially would not ever declaw, and the fabrics recommended for scratch resistance are so far; good quality microfiber, corduroy, heavy canvas, outdoor fabric, crypton, pleather, distressed leather, ikea sofas with slipcovers and polyester velvet. For hairballs; microfiber, outdoor fabric and washable white slipcovers that can be bleached. I have a world of knowledge now! Thanks to everyone for their input. I feel like the world is a village of wonderful cat people!
6 Likes   September 24, 2013 at 5:59AM
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PRO
Needle & Shears Custom Decor
WOW! So many suggestions and comments. We get several calls a week from pet owners looking for slipcovers to solve this problem. After 15 years we have come to the conclusion that nothing stands in the way of a determined cat. However, a good tightly woven micro fiber seems to do well - at least that's what our customers tell us. http://www.needleandshears.com/
2 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 27, 2013 at 2:28PM
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Mary Lowell Navitas
Thanks to some commenters, I just bought the Smart Cat Scratching Post from Amazon. Thanks!
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 27, 2013 at 3:37PM
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Stewarts Point
Spray it with catnip spray every day or so.
0 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 27, 2013 at 4:22PM
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lemi
You probably don't need any additional advice but I have been through this several times with several kitties over the years. Leather or bonded (faux) leather can scratch or be punctured easily but assuming your kitties don't use it for a scratching post, most cats don't like the way it feels & I have found they won't lay on it. If they jump up on the back or run across while playing, it can definitely be damaged. The Karlstaad from Ikea has a cover called Isunda grey or gray that's a tweed like fabric, not too dark that most stores still have (although it's not currently on the website). I called my local store & they are still carrying those slipcovers. Friends with cats & dogs swear this is the hardest wearing couch they have had & unless the cats are using it to scratch continuously in the same spot, it doesn't show hair or claw marks. I think they are supposed to be dry cleaned but my friends throw their covers in a washer.
I have a polyester fabric that has a bit of texture to it on my sofa from Macys & any snags from claws look like part of the fabric.
A friend has a very heavy chenille on her couch & claw marks don't show but because it's a solid color, cat hair shows pretty badly & seems to want to stick to it.
I am looking for a new sofa again & based on what I have seen & tested, get a tweed type fabric which won't show cat hair as badly, just make sure it isn't a loose weave they can snag. Solids will always show hair unless the sofa is the same color as the cat. I am having good luck with Rowe Furniture. They have over 500 fabrics & I have been testing 8 swatches the last few days. As soon as I laid them on the old sofa, my cat wanted to lay on them so I definitely saw which ones are better with cat hair immediately. The good part is that of the original 15 fabrics I selected, only one of them is not the lowest price point so they have a good range of fabrics at the least expensive price point. I am doing a sectional and I am finding them in the 1600-2200 price range. Their couches seem to be more in the 900-1300 range.
I tried the claw covers (mine hates the process of putting them on) and they seem to pop off all the time - too much maintenance for me. I know it's harder to teach when cats are adults but adding a few extra scratching posts, especially taller ones helped when mine was a kitten & just trying to scratch the couch for the first time. I would pull her off couch, take her to the post & scratch on it myself. To this day if I go scratch the post, she will come do the same. Keeping all 4 claws trimmed every 2 weeks helps prevent marks on the couch more than anything.
Good luck finding a suitable couch for you & your adorable kitties!
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    September 30, 2013 at 9:46PM
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PRO
La Bella Antiques and Fine Furnishings
There's a polyester microfiber velvet on the market that cats do not care for. I've used it in my clients homes successfully that have cats. For some reason cats seem to not like the texture. It has a luxurious look and hand and can be used for many applications. The fabric's name is Belsire and it comes in at least a dozen colors. Currently the manufacturer carrying it is Klaussner. Any reputable furniture store that carries Klaussner will offer fabric by the yard.
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    October 2, 2013 at 9:29AM
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Anne
@la Bella How does the fabric do with showing/holding animal hair?
0 Likes   October 2, 2013 at 10:17AM
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Sheralyn Miller
We have six (yes SIX...) kitties inside...it's a long story, so I'll skip it to say that we also have 2 cocoa brown microsuede sofas that we purchased in 2003 for about $800 each. They have NO claw holes or scratches and only a small stain or two (probably from hubby). These sofas have been thrown up on (by the kitties, not us... ;0) and have had full glasses of red wine splashed on them by kitties jumping across me and have also endured an occasional plate of spaghetti or roast beef spilled on them. Honestly, they still look almost brand new. They do collect cat fur, but a good vacuum (i use the floor brush & the upholstery brush) and they look great again. I try to keep washable throws on them because that makes touch ups easier, but it's not necessary to protect the upholstery. However, keeping them out of vases is another matter altogether.... :)
8 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    October 2, 2013 at 3:10PM
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cindinfocus
Hee hee!
0 Likes   October 2, 2013 at 9:22PM
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PRO
La Bella Antiques and Fine Furnishings
@ Anne ~pet hair wipes right off! It also doesn't get embedded in the fibers. I have two mastiffs and covered "their" sofas with it. It's great!
1 Like   Thanked by cindinfocus    October 3, 2013 at 7:10AM
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PRO
Design Line Kitchens
Do you like Mission Style furniture? Nothing to scratch...
0 Likes   October 3, 2013 at 8:44AM
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rosebud3
Sheralyn - adorable!!!!!
0 Likes   October 11, 2013 at 9:30AM
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dexter4
I have three very hairy indoor cats that have not been declawed. I have a microfiber couch that they do not touch, as well as an entire leather set of den furniture. I want to replace my living room couch, which is loosely woven that they HAVE scratched on. I will look for an inexpensive microfiber. Will buy a new couch before taking my cats claws.
5 Likes   Thanked by cindinfocus    October 14, 2013 at 10:08AM
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rahul7720
Hello,

There is a simple solution to avoid scratches on furnitures:

Watch this video:


Please follow the link for more information:

1) http://www.feliway.com/us/Cat-Behavior/Scratching

2) http://www.amazon.com/Comfort-Zone-Feliway-Spray-Milliliters/dp/B003E71E24
0 Likes   October 20, 2013 at 10:51AM
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alexzee
I have 2 cats, all claws in place. They don't scratch the furniture because I provide them with their own scratching post.
3 Likes   October 31, 2013 at 10:59AM
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ljoyw
After reading everyone's comments, I think I've found the perfect cat-resistant sofa. It's slipcovered and has some Tier 3, Sunbrella fabric options available. So while it can be washed, because if you order it with the Sunbrella fabric, you may not even need to ever wash it—with a little luck, just spot treat it. Here's the link if anyone is interested. I'm ordering now and have high hopes for this one: http://www.clubfurniture.com/chssesl.html
2 Likes   December 31, 2013 at 3:26PM
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PRO
Daybreak Workroom LLC
Sunbrella (Glen Raven Mills) has really done its homework with respect to marketing. Too bad they do such a crummy job with sample books... that cost retailers a pretty penny!

I've been working with their solution dyed fabrics for over 20 yrs., and trust me they are not the "end all and be all" of bullet-proof fabric. They're wonderful in many applications, but once the factory applied stain resistant finish is worn away they're really pretty ordinary!
1 Like   December 31, 2013 at 3:31PM
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okdokegal
I have owned a cat that had all four corners done when he was small; he took extra care to train him not to dart out doors to the hall or the great outdoors, and extra attention to his well being (keeping him indoors only). He made it to 19 with nearly a decade of slowly progressing renal failure (his vet supported us all the the way and he had a very good purry life) and had to be put to sleep finally, New Year's Day 2002. We still miss him. I have actually seen the surgery done; it's not pretty either. I've also had my own accidents fingerwise so I can relate... I am not an advocate of it.

If you are home most of the time and I found it best to have a pair (one of each), with lots of cat-centric things like a really good scratching post (those cardboard ones where they can stretch out on it horizontally) are much favored, as is a good vertical one. Some cats are just 'born to scratch' and others are more laid back. An old normal faced Persian I had once, lovely black with chocolate undercoat, had all his, and loved his scratch posts except... if he wanted to get your attention he'd go over to the couch or a chair, put his paw on it and hook exactly one thread and pop it. Ping.

About one in five cats are not into catnip, and until they reach about 9 months old, aren't into it much. I've had one that it was waste time with catnip but he LIVED for a good ear and neck massage. Getting a massage at the scratch post? Heaven.

Furniture... I tried everything and hot pepper was what finally worked. Tabasco. Sprayed onto sacrificial discarded upholstery fabric and put over the corners with those clear curly prong things you use to nail down armcovers. Taught while young how nasty tabasco tastes, getting it on their paws means They Have To Clean It Off, and used sparingly; but where you mean it; works. I also had one kitty that hated mouse trap surprises, and to get her to stay out of stuff or off stuff or away from stuff, was set a trap, carry her in one arm and the trap in other hand and show her where I put it. Check once in awhile to see if she tripped it.

I took notes about the pet resistant furniture, thank you everyone. We lost our housepurrs and our doggie girl a few years ago; and after the remodel is done, are planning on getting some more. We haven't had a couch for some time, I'd like to have one that wasn't rummage sale fodder because a pet's just going to total it for me (me Plus 1 gallon odoban plus 5 rolls of paper towels and all the raggy towels... trying to save a cat peed couch or a puppy accident christening)

Thank you ljoyw, I have 'favorite tagged' that URL. I love the idea of I can have my couch and my furkids too
1 Like   December 31, 2013 at 3:57PM
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naomibook
Do NOT declaw your cats! No furniture is worth that. We have microsuede. It hasn't held up as well as I'd hoped with our four cats and one beagle. I have heard that a really tight weave works best, but I wasn't able to find that in our rural area. We finally decided that furniture falls in the category of things and pets are family.
1 Like   January 1, 2014 at 7:21AM
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naomibook
Cindifocus, where did you get that wonderful "clawbear"
0 Likes   January 1, 2014 at 7:25AM
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Yvonne Manning-Jones
there is nothing to deter a determined cat. I just got a new microfiber sofa but I am still getting a slip cover. For years I have protected an antique velvet sofa with TWO slipcovers. When guests come over, I just remove them and put them in the closet. I am depriving myself of 100% enjoyment of my furniture but that is the price a cat owner pays. The ultimate cat proof sofa? Wood. Even if they scratch it, it is easily disguised. So, I ordered a Bale daybed to use as a sofa. All it needs is an extra long twin mattress and as many throw pillows as I care to use Visit .http://www.southseasfurniture.com/ This is mine, currently in transit from Bali.
1 Like   January 2, 2014 at 6:54PM
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sange13
My cat destroyed our couches, i got her declawed. Had no choice
1 Like   January 2, 2014 at 9:55PM
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cmcole1121
It seems it depends on the cat - my cat has ripped apart most sofas and chairs and the only ones she seems to have no interest in are the leather chairs. As for microfiber - she has definitely made her mark, although I think it would be worse if it was a textured fabric.
We have had our beautiful living room sofa for about 10 months and it has had a cover on it most of the time :-(. My current dilemma is that she has figured out how to climb up side and get under cover to sleep - but she doesn't seem to scratch. I have left cover on as I figure it's better to have her sleep than scratch it up if I leave it uncovered! It sucks but what am I going to do. It is What it is at this point and declawing her is definitely not an option.
0 Likes   January 2, 2014 at 10:22PM
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rouxb
I would live with shaggy furniture or find a good home for my cat before declawing. No, I'd just live with shaggy furniture.
2 Likes   January 2, 2014 at 10:35PM
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PirateFoxy
You had a choice - you got a cat or agreed to be responsible for the care and well-being of a cat. Once you've done that, you make decisions that are for the best for the animal, even if it means having to give up or change other things. Like putting up with slipcovers or more frequently replacing furniture due to scratching. Want a super-nice home with no one and nothing disturbing your perfect finds? Don't have pets or kids. (Even the best behaved pets will have accidents and bad days.)
2 Likes   January 2, 2014 at 10:52PM
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PRO
CMR Interiors & Design Consultations Inc.
As a designer and owner of multiple cats and a dog-I have been a cat owner for 20 years. I've been also working with ferals and doing TNR for 10 so I have very strong opinions on this subject . I'm also a designer and I understand very much the cost of upholstery, drapes, fabric-all of which are expensive much of the time. So I see both sides of things.

I have never bought into cat hysteria over declawing. Because I know better because I've done it and lived with the cats until they died from something far more insidious that the cat hysteria groups have done nothing about: kidney disease.

When you honestly look at other procedures that cats have done left and right. For example: Fixing them is very serious surgery and you are cutting up their gut and changing their anatomy forever. Not to mention probably messing with their hormones permanently. Which affects their health down the line. Does this not affect their future behavior? Of course it does. But you won't hear that from the cat hysteria crowd.

So its okay to cut the tip of a TNR ferals ear off so that it will be shown they have been fixed to the public? Did you know that is how they mark them so other tnr people will know they have already been fixed? . And who is not to say that the microchip does crazy things to our pets that we may not yet realize????

But to say that one is worse than another is just silly. Not to mention stupid. I'd rather have a happy cat owner than a cat in the pound on the death list. What makes more sense to you?

Owners have to make up their own minds. But as someone who has done it 5 times-and my parents also declawed their cats front and my aunt also declawed-I've never heard of an issue.
2 Likes   January 3, 2014 at 7:28PM
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motupeg
A year ago I bought a pottery barn slip covered sofa (it is so tight it is hard to tell that it is a slipcover) in microfiber. I then put several scratchers (the cats like the ramp type) around the base of the sofa with catnip on them to draw them to the scratchers. So far I have been lucky. No scratches. Now I am trying to find a chair to go with the sofa.
0 Likes   January 3, 2014 at 7:38PM
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alleykat6093
I have four cats, none are declawed. Our first sofa had a textured fabric that our cats LOVED to scratch. It drove me crazy! We purchased a microfiber sofa and none of our cats touch it. Maybe because it doesn't have any texture or anything to dig claws into because the microfiber is so smooth. I also try to keep scratching boxes and sisal rugs around for scratching. We now have three microfiber sofas and none of them have been damaged by the cats. I will be very sad when microfiber goes out of style. Also keep your cats nails trimmed as short as possible. Mine get trimmed every two weeks. That way if anyone gets any funny ideas they can't do too much damage.
0 Likes   January 3, 2014 at 7:39PM
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rouxb
@CMR-Your experience-and trivializing the concern of others about declawing by characterizing it as "hysteria"-notwithstanding, the prevailing opinion of animal protection groups in many countries is that declawing, especially for the "convenience" of the owner is inhumane. I would hate for anyone readying a dilemma about pet-resistant furniture to think that declawing is a "go-to" option. To equate ear tipping and spaying/neutering with declawing for the protection of one's furnishings is, minimally, short-sighted. Those procedures are done to protect the overall health of the feline population. Declawing-not so much. I have cats. The cats have claws (our shelter requires we sign agreement not to declaw), The cats scratch with those claws. I deal with it because that is the promise I made to them and to myself. All done sans hysteria.
5 Likes   January 3, 2014 at 8:43PM
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PirateFoxy
@rouxb - Your post made me think of the people who get their dogs de-barked rather than just, I dunno, DEALING WITH WHY THE DOG IS BARKING ALL THE TIME? I mean, it is entirely possible that there's the odd problem puppy where the owners really have tried everything and the barking is so problematic that the dog can't be kept and likely couldn't be rehomed, but the average dog, the barking is because the dog is lonely or under-exercised or stressed or bored, and those are all things that you should fix for the good of the dog anyway - removing the dog's ability to bark annoyingly is just making it harder for the dog to tell you that there's an issue that you should be dealing with.
2 Likes   January 3, 2014 at 9:34PM
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rouxb
word
1 Like   January 3, 2014 at 9:42PM
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motupeg
alleykat6093 Congrats on your sofa's being unscratched! May I ask what side chairs did you purchase? I was thinking of mainly a wood chair with a microfiber seat but haven't found any comfortable.
0 Likes   January 4, 2014 at 7:37AM
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jn3344
Old thread but a timeless problem.

For furniture - I have found they mostly like the arms and backs. So if a new piece of furniture is introduced into the house I cover it with a heavy clear vinyl on the arms and back. They wont touch it. Then, after a month or so, I remove the vinyl and like magic, no scratching. If you have company in the meantime just remove it then put it back when the company is gone.

Oh yeah, you can clip their nails pretty short if you do it every 2 weeks as has been recommended. Don't cut the quick the first couple times you do it. Eventually the quick will draw up closer and you can clip the nails shorter. I use a human nail clipper, works better than the cat one I have found.
1 Like   January 4, 2014 at 7:58AM
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rouxb
I did the same thing with plastic wrap. Just wrapped the base and removed it after a few months. At the first sign of re-interest in the chair, out comes the plastic wrap.
0 Likes   January 4, 2014 at 7:07PM
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housewren
I made slip covers of natural canvas, ( heavy mattress ticking might do). The cover does not fit tightly so it was not very rewarding for nail sharpening. I also hung the cardboard scatch blocks from the wall with a screw as my cat liked to sharpen his claws on a vertical surface. Cats like to stretch when they scratch so hang the block up as high as high as
the cat can stretch. Clear wide tape on areas where cats scratch works pretty well. Pet stores are apt to sell it for that purpose. Try clear tape on one area first so that you know it will not damage the furniture. ( The cat most likely will do more damage than the clear tape.
0 Likes   January 29, 2014 at 4:39PM
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Popsy Harley
Leather is absolutely the last material if choise. We have tried almost everything & micro fibre seems to be the most hard wearing. Leather is not forgiving at all, unless you are going with a very heavy buffalo distressed leather. That MIGHT work. =^,^=
0 Likes   March 1, 2014 at 9:11AM
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Popsy Harley
Declawing is NOT a cat lovers choise. How would you like your fingers amputated because you scratch, after all it's a natural necessity. If you can't stand the idea of your cat scratching you sofa, then a cat is not the pet fo you.
2 Likes   March 1, 2014 at 9:17AM
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carolkelley
I don't know if anyone has posted this yet, but Jackson Galaxy, the cat daddy of My Cat From Hell suggests putting a scratching post near where the cat the cat already likes to scratch and also making sure that the surface is either horizontal or vertical according to what the cat already liked. He also recommends claw caps (Soft Paws) for the uncurable scratcher.

Jackson has a number of videos on YouTube that talk about declawing and why not to do it, how to satisfy that scratching need without destroying your furniture and why you should NOT use water bottles to correct your cat.
0 Likes   March 1, 2014 at 9:43AM
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carolkelley
Naughty No More is a good book about clicker training cats.
0 Likes   March 1, 2014 at 9:55AM
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PRO
Hrivnak Associates, Ltd.
Easiest question yet. Lose the cat!
0 Likes   March 1, 2014 at 12:29PM
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Popsy Harley
It takes a special kind of person to choose their sofa over the life of their cat. I would want to be around a person like that. Glad I dont know you.
3 Likes   March 1, 2014 at 1:48PM
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Ann Blackwood
Trying to decide between Maharam Milestone and cotton velvet for a Reid sectional at DWR. My cats don't seem to scratch as much any more, but when I had two leather chairs, they scratched the heck out of them. Which material less likely to be scratched?
0 Likes   May 10, 2014 at 12:46AM
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Diane Brewer
Cats hate polyester microfiber velvet, stay away from cottons and rayons
0 Likes   May 10, 2014 at 7:52AM
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blackwhitecat
I tried with microfiber, but my cat carried on to scratch the sofa arms. That's why I decided to follow the instructions I read on a website that realize tailored anti-scratch covers for sofa and armchairs. It was awesome! It was even easier than I thought :) My Tracy now is no more stressed with my scoldings :))) Great Cat Friendly Sofa.com!
1 Like   June 4, 2014 at 10:31PM
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fatima1958
Declawing is amputation. Cats have a need to scratch. Get ample scratching posts. Have what you like for fabric (except silk) and put double sided tape on the corners.
2 Likes   June 28, 2014 at 6:07PM
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motupeg
I had a chair destroyed by one of my cats. I had the chair and ottoman recovered and followed a suggestion from this thread. I covered them with painters plastic sheeting and left it there for two months. I now just have towels on them to catch their hair if they sit on the it. I also have a cat scratcher by it just in case. No scratching yet.
1 Like   June 28, 2014 at 6:17PM
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subtlesparrow
I've got two kitties who shredded my last hand-me-down couch. When I bought a couple new, expensive couches I wanted to keep them from becoming scratching posts!

First, I bought a scratcher and placed it near the new furniture. When I started noticing the first signs of scratching on the corners, I taped tinfoil over the favored corners. It has been five months and I am pleased to report that the couches are still intact!
1 Like   June 28, 2014 at 6:42PM
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Popsy Harley
Well, I have tried the double sided sticky tape, without much luck. Most of my cats are pretty well educated as to what they are allowed to sharpen their claws on except one. He is a real challenge. Sticky tape does not work on him, neither does the NO, clapping loudly or the water bottle. He is the must undomesticated, stubborn cat we have ever had. But I am going to try the foil. Its worth a try. Bitter spray seems to work some what, but then everyone in the house tastes it for days.
1 Like   June 29, 2014 at 12:03PM
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Susan Pittman
There's an awesome place that makes CUSTOM slip covers and replacement cushion covers for a very reasonable price. http://www.slipcovershop.com
0 Likes   July 15, 2014 at 5:20PM
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wisneb
One of our cats might try to scratch, not much. The younger one doesn't, but she has hook-like claws that get stuck in the tiny looped fabric of our sofas. They never seem to get stuck on the smooth microfiber in the family room. Stay away from looped fabrics.
0 Likes   July 15, 2014 at 5:35PM
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Eric Haubert
It is very hard to keep a cat away from scratching the sofas. And leather sofas shows scratches a lot. My idea will be to buy a scratching post . In some case it will be effective but not so in some other cases. A replaceable covers will be a good idea too. The best idea will be to not allow cats in the room with those leather sofas from coja by sofa4life, Vaughan, Ontario, Canada but you know it is easier said than done.
0 Likes   July 22, 2014 at 3:04AM
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designcrazy288
Do NOT declaw your cats I've got two and they were a problem with scratching the couches, I solved that by adding a cat scratcher and if that doesn't work say no very firmly (still have the cat scratcher) and in courage them to use the cat scratcher and not a leather couch maybe velvet.
0 Likes   July 22, 2014 at 3:28AM
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PRO
Hrivnak Associates, Ltd.
This is way too easy. Get rid of the cats.
1 Like   July 22, 2014 at 6:55AM
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Popsy Harley
Your soo funny. NOT
0 Likes   July 22, 2014 at 11:36AM
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adivra
I kept my cats away by purchasing very tightly woven fabric and then put citrus peel and whole bulbs of garlic by the corners. They never attacked that sofa and chair. Destroyed everything else including wood table legs. There's only so much peel and garlic you can have around the house.
1 Like   July 22, 2014 at 12:32PM
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bdeese
Distressed leather.
0 Likes   July 22, 2014 at 12:40PM
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bkallaur
I am in the market for a sofa and have been looking at Cococo Home Sedona leather which they claim is virtually scratch proof. I may, however, just get a new slipcover for the old sofa and see how microfiber works. As someone else said, I'll sacrifice the sofa before the claws.. I've done that with a previous generation before we knew the problems, and there were major behavioral issues with one cat...Alas, one can't live in a showroom and have animals or kids.
0 Likes   September 7, 2014 at 6:00PM
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PRO
River Valley Cabinet Works
@Hrivnak Associates, Ltd.- That suggestion was tried on another post; nearly cost me my kidneys.
As for fabric-velcro? Kevlar?
0 Likes   September 7, 2014 at 6:16PM
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dooders1981
Declawing is the only way to assure your home will stay beautiful. It is humane and they heal well. Declaw a cat only if it is in an inside cat only. Outdoor cats need their claws. Inside cats can and do live happily for 16 or more years with no claws.
0 Likes   September 7, 2014 at 6:26PM
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1 Like   September 7, 2014 at 6:40PM
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bungalowmo
sltheisen wrote:
Declawing them front and back is the only way to prevent damage. Leather will show scratches.

@dooders1981...this is a wake-up call for you as well. FAR from "humane"!!!

OMG!!!!! ANYONE who resorts to this should never ever be allowed animals! EVER!
http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/cats/tips/declawing.html

Here......Lets do this to YOU & see how you like it!!!!

**there are tips for stopping unwanted scratching....
3 Likes   September 7, 2014 at 6:56PM
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studio10001
bungalowmo- jinx! You owe me a coke.
2 Likes   September 7, 2014 at 7:07PM
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bungalowmo
I'd buy you a case if it gets people to see this is 100% unacceptable!!!
2 Likes   September 8, 2014 at 2:55PM
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adivra
Declawing a cat is absolutely cruel. It also shortens their life span. Cats are meant to scratch, the resistance claws provide keeps their muscles and bones in good shape which in turn keeps them healthy. Without claws the muscles atrophy.
1 Like   September 8, 2014 at 3:47PM
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dooders1981
It does not shorten their life! Give me a break. It's okay to have differing opinions on this topic but plezzzzzz do not just make stuff up! Our PURRFECTLY HAPPY, loved beyond words, 2 house cats lived to 14 ( one did) with no health problems EVER and had a wonderful life. . Out other is still happily co-existing with us and our beautiful, unscratched furniture/floors for 10 years now and going strong. I'm the queen of my castle not my pets. Now, when it comes to humans- yes- their sedentary lives can and do shorten their lives ( can you say-30% obesity rates) My cat is anything BUT sedentary. It's okay to disagree. I support declawing for indoor cats to protect your biggest investment. If you don't, then don't declaw yours. My future cat will be declawed.
1 Like   September 8, 2014 at 7:18PM
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flopsycat1
Flopsy is now 16 years old, purrs whenever you touch her, has never been sick, and is front paw declawed. We did not declaw her, it had been done prior to our adopting her from a rescue.
There are many would-be pet owners who will not take in a cat which is likely to ruin their furniture, rugs and curtains. Therefore, without declawing, there is the risk of losing potential adoptive homes. In volunteering for animal rescues, it is clear that we need more homes for pets, not fewer. Fewer homes = more cats headed for euthanasia. This is an emotional issue, but I firmly believe that it is better for the cat to lose its claws than to lose its life.
0 Likes   September 8, 2014 at 7:42PM
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bungalowmo
My biggest investment isn't a monetary one....it's my pets. Life over "things" always.
3 Likes   September 9, 2014 at 9:03AM
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studio10001
And while nobody wants to see animals without a home, that is roughly the same argument made for FGM. The view that some animals seem to survive without side effect is not to the point,as a reported 38% of declawed cats have extreme issues of mobility and lethargy (note that the figure includes none but extreme problems): their existence should not be predicated on the potential for harm from their owners.
1 Like   September 9, 2014 at 10:45AM
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PRO
Hrivnak Associates, Ltd.
Scratch-proof furniture... concrete... yes, there is such a thing... used in corrections industry. Don't like concrete furniture? Two simple solutions; keep the cat outside where it can do some good ridding of mice and snakes or get rid of it. The amount of cat dander and floating hair in the air can't be healthy anyway. Yes, I'm allergic to cats and they know that - they are attracted to those of us with such allergies. No, the rest of us don't like your cat as much as you do. Or the smells. Or the sneezing. Or the itchy eyes. You asked for an answer. You got one. Simple, logical, and allows you to purchase whatever furniture you want. No, don't think "cat people" will be swayed. Your alternative is to deal with the airborne "stuff" and retire your furniture rather frequently.
0 Likes   September 9, 2014 at 11:09AM
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litehearted
I think I'm somewhere in the middle on this one.
We have two cats and that is plenty. I'm not tempted to fill our home with animals.
Yes, there is cat dander and floating hair, but can be kept in check by (a) brushing cats regularly and (b) normal cleaning routine [vacuuming/dusting]. Lint brush works wonders on clothes. You learn which fabrics fur tends to stick to the most. Our new sofa will be covered in Polyester, very durable.
Those with severe rather than moderate allergies, can take an anti-histamine before visiting or we meet up elsewhere. As for people who hate animals, not a problem, I don't have friends like that. On purpose. ha ha
0 Likes   September 20, 2014 at 12:25PM
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xredheadx
I don't know the answer, but DO NOT EVER declaw your cat for furniture. It is extremely painful! Many cats do not 100% recover. It often causes the cat to not use the litter box due to pain. Declawing is the equivalent of amputating your last joint off every toe. Declawing is an AMPUTATION!

That being said. I have 3 cats. I have leather furniture. I deal with the occasional surface scratch and encourage my cats to stay off the furniture unless they want to snuggle. It works.
1 Like   October 2, 2014 at 7:05PM
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motupeg
Has anyone used the plastic nail covers? I have one that uses the scratching boxes/trees but also everything else.
0 Likes   October 2, 2014 at 7:31PM
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Ann Blackwood
I ended up getting the ultra suede from Design Within Reach -- so far the cats have mostly left it alone, other than sitting on it. I have also put double-sided tape on a previous couch when I first got it, and then the cats were averse to the stickiness and did not develop the habit of scratching there. I have used the plastic nail covers and they work, but ask yourself if you will realistically if you will change or have your vet change the nail covers at least once every 6 weeks.
0 Likes   October 2, 2014 at 10:36PM
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emilylovesragdoll
I solved the scratching problem! I am definetely against declawing and soft paws, that's why I was looking for a real cat-proof couch cover. Finally I found on line Cat Friendly Sofa and I ordered two tailored covers. It works perfectly: no more scratches on my couch (www.catfriendlysofa.com).
0 Likes   October 5, 2014 at 12:34PM
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PRO
Hines & Associates
I have micro suede and crushed velvet. My sofa is navy blue and both my jack Russell's are on it every day. The one scratches it as if he is feline and it has done very well. The only maintenance That is involved is I have a lint roller nearby for a quick clean up of stray hairs and of course a vacuum every two weeks. It was not an expensive sofa as I have done that route in the past and they lasted two years. I have considered the slipcover route but I hate the idea of constantly having to wash them and pit them back on. I also have blankets in a huge covered baskets that when I know visitors are coming I do a quick brush up then place the blanket down, doorbell rings blanket goes back in basket. Couch looks perfect. I know people say invest in a expensive couch however that does not seem to work when you have kids and pets. I did however change the feet for 60$. And I am 4 years into this couch and it looks great. Best of luck.
0 Likes   October 5, 2014 at 1:53PM
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Yvonne Manning-Jones
emilylovesragdoll what is the website fr Car Friendly Sofa?
0 Likes   October 5, 2014 at 3:42PM
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emilylovesragdoll
Hi Yvonne! The website is www.catfriendlysofa.com. You have to send them your couch's measurements and some picture. It works very well! ;)
0 Likes   October 5, 2014 at 11:34PM
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Timothy Lippman
If you appreciate this style... http://goo.gl/LwxPDy
0 Likes   last Thursday at 12:51AM
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