Resilient Buildings for Global Warming
chookchook2
December 13, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Are you planning a new building or renovation that takes Global Warming into account? If you are coastal, it may be flood mitigation. If you are inland, it might be heat mitigation. Maybe you are preparing for increased storms, or increased fuel bills, or food shortages, or population pressures. Please keep answers to property design. eg
http://cleantechnica.com/2008/04/10/holland-builds-floating-houses-in-response-to-climate-change/
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
What do you know about preparing buildings against mild floods, Fred? Is there a waterproofing compound to paint under floorboards?
December 13, 2013 at 1:55am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 13, 2013 at 2:43am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 13, 2013 at 2:54am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mefor
I live in a stone house. It stays cool on very hot days. Occasionally if it's very warm at night, the stone will release some of that pent up heat into the house during the night, but overall, it's a wonderful building material with passive cooling :)
In the wintertime, the heat that is soaked into stone on sunny days keeps house a bit warmer. Also, the tight fit of the 22inch thick walls of stone and mortar is very draft proof.
December 13, 2013 at 3:28am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thankyou Mforr.
December 13, 2013 at 3:31am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Does anyone have storm shutters?
December 13, 2013 at 3:32am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
I loved my hurricane shutters when I lived along the US Gulf of Mexico, they saved windows for me! Of course they didn't help when Ivan took the roof off but hey, can't have everything!

We think we've found the new house - the list of 'must-haves' included southern exposures to help with heating (we live in a cold climate) and enough space for a good sized poly tunnel or even greenhouse+the ability to change the central heating to multi-fuel owing to the really horrific price rises for gas and electric we're seeing here in the UK.

Also on the list: double/triple glazing, multiple entry/exits, windows able to be used as exits in case of emergency, and insulated loft-walls-floors. Over here almost every home we've looked at is stone, thick walls that need to be insulated to keep out the damp.
December 13, 2013 at 3:50am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
There's a lot of good ideas there,Sunnie.
December 13, 2013 at 3:54am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Our electric is so high no matter how much we reduce usage it just goes up.
December 13, 2013 at 3:56am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
I met my now husband online, Chook, in an international current events discussion focussing on issues like this one.

In early 2008 he posted a picture of one of his conservation saves of what had to be the most resilient property ever, spread (lol) over a bare one acre plot and sustaining a family of six with the smallest 'carbon footprint' possible. LOL, I really believe that's when I 'fell in love' with him.

It had been 'updated' badly, as part of his work he got it listed and restored. The family was able to keep the few updates that were in line historically whilst managing to mitigate some of the issues our changing climate is engendering - all the other 'updates' were cosmetic and frankly awful, the family was glad to see those go. That home will be sustainable for several more generations, it's really well done.

The property already used southern exposure, poly tunnel veg and fruit gardening, multi-fuel heating (and water too), but took advantage of the various schemes he was able to lead them to as far as insulation and a few other things to make the home even more resilient - he took a lot of mental notes and has applied that to our homes (we're on No2, working on No3). I have to be honest that it does make me feel a bit smug when our electric bill is a mere £30 a month, and we don't fash a grid failure thanks to the multi-fuel back boiler heating.
December 13, 2013 at 4:06am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
Chook, I had increasingly high bills in the US owing to the need for near-year-round air conditioning. I expect it's the same for you there in Australia. It's one of the reasons we chose to live in his native Scotland instead of the US. Plus his house was bigger, lol!
December 13, 2013 at 4:08am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
They reckon temperatures will go up 4degrees. However, due to ice melting in the poles, they say some coastal areas near gulf streams will actually get colder.
December 13, 2013 at 4:14am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
My reverse cycle air on broke a year ago and I deliberately didn't get it fixed, but the bill still went up. It is pure price gouging. I have a wood heater but don't use it due to athsma. The locals say the cost of wood has gone way up anyway. The price of gas is going up due to our country exporting it.
December 13, 2013 at 4:20am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mommickey
geothermal is being installed in homes around here alot. Price gouging is crazy for it though. solar panels the same thing. I can only burn birch due to my asthma and allergies. I am allergic to the other woods. you may try that.
December 13, 2013 at 4:45am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thanks 5blues! Geothermal might survive storms better than solar panels, does anyone know?
December 13, 2013 at 4:55am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 13, 2013 at 4:57am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mommickey
We know someone who has the geothermal in his house and it was hit by sandy it's on the beach. As far As I know the wiring need to be redone as per code. The unit I am not sure I wil ask. I know the drilling down part is o.k. but his house had just been finished 4 million right on the beach water up to the second floor. The good thing is he bought the lot right next to it and the home that was completely under water and plans to fix his and rent it and build an even bigger house on the lot next door.
December 13, 2013 at 5:15am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
5Blues your friend must have thought he was doing all the right things and it just wasn't fair. Sunnie you must have felt the same.
December 13, 2013 at 5:32am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
You know Chook, I really didn't to be honest. I lived in Hurricane Central and knew one day I would be hit hard - comes with the territory, I figured.

I did move away from Earthquake Central as soon as I could (grew up along the San Andreas and other lesser known faults) because those can't be predicted, but hurricanes and tornadoes can to a certain extent. 'Watch the sky!' was art-carved into the average person's brain along the Gulf. But 'canes turn and tornadoes come out of nowhere sometimes, and LOL, I even went through a couple of small earthquakes along the Gulf too!

I don't think there is anywhere 'safe' from natural disaster, one has to know the territory and prepare to the best of ability. After that it's come what may.
December 13, 2013 at 5:41am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
cormac1
Just move up north to the woods and build an I.C.F house. No hurricanes, earthquakes or tornadoes up here to worry about just snow and cold haha.
December 13, 2013 at 5:50am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
Chook- come on, you a person who does not keep on topic on most threads, now posts a thread and asks everyone to keep their comments/answers to design and no less sighting an example?????? Just how many are there of you? ;))))))))))))))))))
December 13, 2013 at 5:50am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 13, 2013 at 5:52am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
I believe Al Gore invented global warming along with the internet.
December 13, 2013 at 5:52am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Very broad topic this!!
December 13, 2013 at 5:53am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
All opinions valued, Margo.
December 13, 2013 at 5:54am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
I think I heard it on Al Jazerra lol
December 13, 2013 at 5:55am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
Chook what does Gert and Ughh say?
December 13, 2013 at 5:56am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
Where is spinning and Hugh? They should be swirling over this topic
December 13, 2013 at 5:57am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
You know I value you too, Chook;))
December 13, 2013 at 5:57am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Margo
there is no global warming today in Misery, I mean Missouri;)
December 13, 2013 at 5:59am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Don't know what Al Jazerra is. Gert has kept her hand mixer, warm quilt, Harris Tweed coat, wicker chairs, folding fan, toast tongs, big floppy hats, verandah, wood fire, DDT, stovetop kettle, fruit trees and bottling kit, chook yard, vegetable garden, and especially her doileys; so she is ready for all eventualities. Uggh survived the IceAge and is hoping for a nice bit of global warming so his family can climb back into the trees again.
December 13, 2013 at 6:06am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 13, 2013 at 6:09am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mommickey
Sadly some people will not get anywhere near what they need to recover. Even with insurance. My husband is in emergency services who would have thought that sandy would ruin so much even inland. He was on a call and almost killed from a tree falling on them saving some kid who decided to go out in a storm. Some people don't take these storm seriously. Those few weeks the winds came through new jersey and it was a mess with down tree's last year. Sadly global warming and the storms devasted the beaches and dunes are gone.
You don't need a bad storm to experience loss in a home. I had 110,000 in damage from a bad water fill line that ruined my new kitchen. Insurnace did not cover everything. It took all of our savings and left us taking almost two years to recover savings and everything. I miss six months of my son growing up due to running, stress and trying to get our home fixed and dealing with it all. I would never recommend a reno with a young child it takes quality time away. They paid us 8.00 to repaint a room with new drywall. That did not even cover primer let alone regular paint. No one is safe from any type of disaster. All you can do is try to be prepared.
Going green like sweden we are smart enough but corporate greed will never let it happen sadly. They seem to think more money is made in not being green. Sweden ran out of trash to recycle and now imports it from ://www.greenconduct.com/news/2013/08/01/sweden-is-a-model-of-sustainable-waste-management/ the united states needs to do this.
What is bad is that barbadoes is more green friendly than the united states. You need to recycle and you cannot knock down a building to build new. You must use existing and add if you need to. We saw shacks that had solar panels and hot water bins for their showers on a island tour.
The united states needs to get smarter. We have so much technology to build green here but greed will stop homes from being better bulit as the standard. It is cheaper and bigger profit to a builder to build a stick home with siding. Than to do say a house half bult in the ground with walls that are more solid and keep energy cost down. Whatever is causing the storms to do more damage. mayan life cycle end. lol. global warming, chemtrails etc. or just natural earth cycles. What ever you chose to believe or which one if any are true either way the storms are doing more damage. No matter how you look at it if we don't find greener ways will will run out of room for trash etc.
December 13, 2013 at 6:10am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
,
December 13, 2013 at 6:20am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
I read the stuff about Al Jazeera. Amazing turn around. Wouldn't believe it could happen in a post9/11 America.
December 13, 2013 at 6:21am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
THANKYOU 5Blues, you have been through so much, it doesn't seem fair. I was sitting in Australia watching the weather channel watching on the satellite picture, Sandy come spinning across the sea. It was so huge, I was praying it would turn and go back to sea and not wipe out the whole coast and all the big cities.
December 13, 2013 at 6:28am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
mommickey
Even though that happen I am very blessed. Some people lost it all. I have lost nothing in comparison to people in tornado area's etc. I have my family some people have lost more than material things.
December 13, 2013 at 6:37am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Did many people die in Hurricane Sandy?
December 13, 2013 at 6:47am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
I will be away from the thread for a day, please keep contributing.
December 13, 2013 at 11:23am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
nwduck
Ah, so, chookchook2, here you are! One of my thoughts on this general topic is that it might be helpful for us to look in the rear view mirror to see how much earlier generations built in your geographic area. For example, building (or rebuilding) directly ON a beach should be discouraged. Our ancestors built on stilts in flood-prone areas. Storm shutters weren't just a decorative item. Water runoff was stored---and this is still completely doable in any area-- used for irrigation and for grey water use like toilets. Trees are highly valued here in Oregon, as they should be everywhere. Thanks to the grove of evergreens at the south side of our home, we have never used air conditioning. In the American plains, homes they called dugouts were common...built into the earth to preserve materials and to stay warm in winter/cool in summer. (Just saw a feature on a high style home like that here in the metro area within the past year.) I have also seen homes here built using very thick walls, insulated with what is essentially hay. Homes with green roofs (and I don't mean the color) for insulation/air quality additions/rainwater for the plants, and recycled as I mentioned above. Farmers along Oregon's Columbia Gorge, famous for its high winds, have now installed modern windmills within the wheatfields. What has driven many of these seemingly unusual trials? Tax rebates. Financial incentives can help lead to modern economical versions of old, proven techniques. Many programs like this exist, so a person building with the mindset you describe should absolutely investigate these avenues.
December 13, 2013 at 11:41pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
A bunch of very good ideas , nwduck.
December 14, 2013 at 1:51am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
J Petempich
I am retired in Mexico six months a year off the grid. Except for not having a dishwasher and air conditioning, I live much like I do when I am living in the US the other 6 months. I have 6 solar panels 200 watts each plus a wind generator that is another 800 watts so roughly a 2000 watt/24Vdc/120ac system. We also collect water. We are on a beach so the wind is blowing constantly and most sunny days. I don't think there are many places in the world that a person could have such a small system and run the size house we do but even in Michigan where I live the other six months there is enough wind with the right generator would put a large dent in an electric bill. The power companies are installing wind farms throughout the state even though our energy bill didn't pass. It is largely because it is very economical for them to produce with the wind generators. There are plenty of ways to have inexpensive electricity, we just aren't quite there on making the changes in our lives to adapt to it and the power companies are tight fisted about using them. I think when the last drop of oil and lump of coal is burned we will see all the great inventions for producing power come out. It is unfortunate that in the meantime we ruin the environment with what we are doing.
December 14, 2013 at 7:35am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
vee228
"Global Warming" is a crock.
December 14, 2013 at 8:02am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sstarr
bobby2288, what a silly thing to say.
December 14, 2013 at 8:09am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
Wow, Bobby2288 and SStar, my husband and I go around and around on this, too:) The only thing we can agree on is the climate IS changing and not for the better.

I did some reading on this and there are credible arguments either way re GW. My takeaway is that GW actually causes climate changes that can lead to a mini-ice age, oddly enough. We're certainly seeing some anecdotal evidence of that here in the far Northern Hemisphere - I live in NE Scotland, it is getting colder here but our summers are 'enjoying' much warmer spells. Shorter than usual, but much warmer when we do have a warm spell.

Last winter, though, our snow pack lasted longer and our winter storms much more hazourdous. Winter deaths to in-home hypothermia on the uptick, and a much higher hillwalker and skiing death toll too.

But please-please-please, let's not argue GW, AGW, or the generally agreed cooling that has been the norm for the last 17 years:) Please, as the OP asked, let's keep this discussion civil and focussed on mitigating climate change issues as regards resilient buildings.
December 14, 2013 at 8:28am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
dclostboy
On the Chesapeake, we are very concerned about run off...limiting impermeable surfaces and extra plantings to support filtration.
December 14, 2013 at 9:50am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thank you dclostboy,sunnie2day,sstar,bobby2288,Jpetempich. Sorry I was not here. It is helpful to others to see what people are implementing on their properties. Do people think there should be more government incentives to build resilient properties?
December 14, 2013 at 5:14pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
El Niño will come back, do people have water tanks, if so what form?
December 14, 2013 at 5:19pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
:)
December 14, 2013 at 10:52pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Samantha L
I think this is a great discussion. I'm almost finished buying my first home, in a floodplain, and had minor damage from Hurricane Sandy, about 6 inches water on the first floor. Why? Because I can't afford much more in the area I'd like to continue living. I'd like to make some changes to it after I settle in. Some will need to wait though, because my flood insurance premium is $4000 USD annually as a result of new governance and perceived risk. I'm going to eventually add more vents for flood water to my lower level, and in the long term I'd like to raise my first floor about 1 foot so I'm above the base flood elevation. I want to add solar panels also, and use my grey water, but these are all dreams for now. My homeowners and flood insurance costs are going to cost quite a lot and I want to make sure I don't go broke too soon. :0)
December 14, 2013 at 11:27pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Samantha, I can't find it, I looked yesterday, but weeks ago I saw a solution the people of New Jersey Shore are doing , it was on "This Old House" magazine online. New laws mean they must raise up the whole house, but there is an invention of a fixture for cladding, that actually releases the cladding on first floor, in the event of bad flooding, which lets the water run through, not taking the whole house with it. In mild flooding it doesn't happen. Different cladding is used by different people. Electric and gas etc is all being taken upstairs. People use the new space to store things. Footings of course are very solid, only the cladding is designed to give way. Hope you can find this article.
December 14, 2013 at 11:36pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
It's goodnight here but keep posting resilient houses.
December 15, 2013 at 7:40am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
dclostboy
There are many incentives in the US for sustainability, but still tend to have high payback periods. You really have to WANT to implement regardless of incentive.
December 15, 2013 at 12:09pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Do you think rich countries should help poor countries with resilient buildings and infrastructure like, say, sea walls or water storages to avoid mass refugees in the future?
December 15, 2013 at 5:25pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
apple_pie_order
Chookchook2: what estimates of sea rise and rainfall redistribution do you think would be useful to consider?
December 15, 2013 at 5:56pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
nwduck
chookchook2: Water is the most critical need in multiple developing countries, and there are many groups working on this need. Without water, people leave their land. If you want to see one charitable group's work in rebuilding after disasters, I suggest you look at the site for Make It Right. Did great work in New Orleans, working in the Ninth Ward, supported by Brad Pitt, among many other people. Sometimes we get more done without governments. Sometimes government (same country/out of country) programs work. Investigate and support those causes you believe in. There's never just one right answer. You may find the techniques used in the New Orleans homes of particular interest. (Hey, they built on stilts!) :)
December 15, 2013 at 7:36pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Apple pie order, estimates increase as time goes on. So if you were bequeathing a beach house to your kids they might not lose much value, but in your grand kids day the property might be legislated uninhabitable, unless there was flood mitigation.
December 15, 2013 at 7:42pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
I think I saw some episodes of Holmes on Homes where they worked in New Orleans, Nwduck. Municipal councils along our coast are passing motions to reject responsibility for maintaining seawalls, when I think they should be building them up.
December 15, 2013 at 7:48pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
nwduck
The summer after Katrina, we decided to take our vacation in the southern US. We donated to Katrina relief, but another thing we thought we could do is to GO, and support the greatly damaged tourist trade. $$$ to the working people and local businesses helps, I feel. We saw first hand what Katrina did. Horrifying. Absolutely horrifying, and it was nearly a year later. (I had been to New Orleans and the southern Mississippi coast before, so had a comparison.) One of the issues with the levies in New Orleans is that different levy sections were under the jurisdiction of different parishes. If I recall correctly, it was over 10. Some maintained, some less so. There wasn't really a great coordinated effort on maintenance. This was a fatal flaw. If you can, advocate for a single jurisdiction for maintenance of the entire thing.
December 15, 2013 at 8:12pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
This is why refugee numbers are supposed to go up enormously.
December 15, 2013 at 8:17pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
If you live in one of the areas highlighted on this map link, how would you prepare your property for potential changes to come, or would you want to move, if so where? NB! The areas highlighted on the Australian map show what is already the case, not what they are predicting for Aus.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Natural_disasters_caused_by_climate_change.png
December 15, 2013 at 10:23pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
The Three little Pigs story is a case of pre planning
http://www.shol.com/agita/pigpsych.htm
December 15, 2013 at 10:41pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Building for climate change -London 2062 on u tube

December 15, 2013 at 11:23pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
The video does exist, I just watched it on iPad. Try typing in the words, it is an excellent video.
December 15, 2013 at 11:24pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 15, 2013 at 11:35pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 15, 2013 at 11:43pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 15, 2013 at 11:52pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
The Dutch can teach us alot.
December 15, 2013 at 11:53pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 15, 2013 at 11:58pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thankyou Kennis Voortrekker Klimate TV.
December 15, 2013 at 11:59pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Sorry, auto correct got it wrong. Kennis Voor Klimate TV. Thankyou.
December 16, 2013 at 12:00am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
If you live in Canada, this chap wants to use students to future proof your old house
http://projectfutureproof.com/adaptive-reuse-of-existing-buildings/
December 16, 2013 at 12:08am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Check your building materials for resilience
http://www.buildingresilience.org.au/brkd
December 16, 2013 at 12:49am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Traditional resilience
December 16, 2013 at 1:53am   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 16, 2013 at 1:53am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 16, 2013 at 3:02am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
J Petempich
I know I will get arguments from writing this but another country we could learn from is Cuba. If you look at a hurricane map of the track of hurricanes of the last 10 years you will notice most often they pass over Cuba. Very seldom do they have fatalities from hurricanes. The people of Cuba are not rich and the island does not have great sea walls or houses on stilts. What they do have is a systematic evacuation plan. Every one knows what they will be doing 3 days before the storm, 2days before and day of the storm. Power and gas is turned off the day of the storm. There are block captains that are responsible for the elderly. There isn't any last minute decisions.
December 16, 2013 at 3:52am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
How are Cuban houses built to survive the winds and water?
December 16, 2013 at 4:27am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
A passive shade solution from the Middle East
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mashrabiya
December 16, 2013 at 4:28am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 16, 2013 at 4:34am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
A shade, ventilation,beauty, is the classic Queenslander from Australia, which coped well with flooding underneath. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Queenslander3.JPG
December 16, 2013 at 4:47am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 16, 2013 at 4:52am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
December 16, 2013 at 5:07am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Food security and shade, vertical gardens
http://m.inhabitat.com/inhabitat/#!/entry/urbanana-is-vertical-banana-plantation-that-would-bring-tropical-fruit,509c2b12d7fc7b5670506fc4/1
December 16, 2013 at 5:21am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
J Petempich
My guess that many Cuban houses are concrete/block construction or palapas and they have evacuation reinforced buildings inland. I am sure the palapas are ruined but can be built back quickly. I think concrete and blocks many buildings are made of. I am sure they have real estate damage but just not loss of life. Where I am here in Mexico after Wilma everyone dragged all the damaged debris to the middle of the streets and the military or government took it away. People start working on their houses immediately. In the US people tend to wait for their insurance adjuster and they lose important time they can be draining cavities before mold sets in. This is just my opinion.
December 16, 2013 at 6:06am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Yes, we need to plan to minimise the amount of possessions lost too. One article was saying how Ikea just moved everything upstairs and lost very little, while a neighbouring supermarket lost the lot. That must have been very hard for the people to get supplies.
December 16, 2013 at 6:10am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
We in the west could learn alot from traditional building methods around the world.
December 16, 2013 at 6:11am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
OnePlan
I've always wanted one of those homes built into a south facing hillside (Northern hemisphere ) so you have glass frontage ( triple glazed) and then live most of your days in the front glazed rooms and sleep at the back in the dark and safe hillside ... Think that would offer good protection from lots of inclement weather ... Not sure how it would cope with the really bad stuff though ! If I win lotto I might build a hillside village !! "OnePlan Hills ! " how Cool !!
December 16, 2013 at 7:13am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Sounds like the best idea so far.
December 16, 2013 at 7:18am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Me, Uggh. Me have best real estate for you, Oneplan. Mammoths everywhere.
December 16, 2013 at 7:19am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
OnePlan
I will have to add large pet doors for mammoths !!!
December 16, 2013 at 7:26am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Me still Uggh. Woman does not know hunting, just like mforr woman would not skin deer. Pet door is for dodo bird so dodo can go do doodoo.
December 16, 2013 at 7:40am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
catieb
Chookchook.....the type of wall your talking about for flooding is called a "break away wall". Many of the areas along the Gulf require this type of construction for the lower level that is in the flood plain. The entire wall breaks away, not just the veneer....altho since these are typically not allowed to be living areas they are often built with just a veneer system. The concept is that the structure will stay intact but the wall can give way to a wall of water.

Some people use the open, decorative cmu blocks, with the idea that the water will flow thru the holes and the wall will still be intact after flooding. But this doesn't take into account the piles of debris that are carried by flood waters and cause a lot of the damage.
December 16, 2013 at 8:24am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thankyou catieb, hope this helps alot of people who are currently rebuilding.
December 16, 2013 at 8:26am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 16, 2013 at 1:46pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
PRO
Clear Lighting and Electrical Design
Break-away walls were just on TV on Fabulous Beach Homes. They cover the piers that the home is build on with easily destroyed walls. The water flows under the home just like beach front homes have for many years.

Solar power, geoT, and sustainable dwellings are our passion~ I have lived off grid and plan to again in the very near future. Location, Location, LOCATION. Less summer heat and warmer winters reduces the amount of energy needed. Also build a smaller dwelling, better insulation, correct architecture design and home automation systems.

Earthships, ecohomes, tiny houses are all trending dwellings these days. Here is our site for that type of building consulting... PS don't tell anyone as we rarely comment on this subject here on Houzz... TinyHouseSystems.biz
December 16, 2013 at 1:47pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thankyou Fred and Clearlighting, hope those tips get people on the right tracks.
December 16, 2013 at 6:24pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
J Petempich
One other thing to share about the houses in Mexico built on the beach where I live. The photo shows my cupboards on a raised concrete platform. This is how all of the build ins are. If I removed the furniture, I could clean the inside of my house with a hose. Everything is concrete and tile with floor drains in the bathrooms and battery room. The house is also built on something called pilotes which are concrete pilings. But of course when the storm comes this only helps with the recovery it is assumed water will be in the house.
December 16, 2013 at 6:55pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Did you consider putting legs on units to dry out?
December 16, 2013 at 7:33pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
Holy moly, Chook, this is a GREAT discussion! I'll be the day catching up on your link and watching those videos - luckily I'm knitting a scarf at the last minute as a stocking filler:)

I did like seeing the words 'climate refugee' used, and that map of areas prone to natural disasters. I considered myself a climate refugee in 2005 - left the Gulf of Mexico area after Hurricane Katrina because of Hurricane Katrina. That one happened exactly a year after Ivan took my roof (and nearly everything I owned) - we weren't hit where I lived at the time in SE AL but I knew it was just a matter or time before a huge one like Katrina came in to the Wiregrass. I just couldn't take the climate any longer.

Between the 'canes, tornadoes, and heat, I knew I wouldn't last much longer there so I took a job in NW GA. We did get severe weather in NW GA but it was so much cooler there even in the summer I just shrugged, prepared, and left the rest to God. The biggest natural disaster threat in that part of Georgia was flooding and ice storms - a lot of homes built on stilts or in other ways to keep the main living above flood levels, and most of us, homeowners or renters, worked actively at keeping our above-ground power lines clear of trees.
December 16, 2013 at 11:18pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Thank you Sunnie. What do storm shutters look like/work?
December 16, 2013 at 11:39pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Why was Moly holy?
December 16, 2013 at 11:40pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
December 16, 2013 at 11:49pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Don't work on drop bears.
December 16, 2013 at 11:50pm     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
Lol, Chook, I was taught to say holy moly instead of, well, you know:) Growing up on a cattle ranch a child learns all kinds of interesting words!

My storm shutters were Rolledens, they were mounted like an exterior window shade to the outside frame of the windows and sliding doors and you could hit a panic button that brought down all of the shutters if you splashed out for the really pricy ones:
http://www.rolladenlv.com/gallery.php

Ours were a bit more budget and came out of the factory in southern FL, the 2nd big feature for us was that our set had a manual override so you could close/open in the event of a power failure. 1st big feature was that the shutters could withstand airborne missiles flung about by very high winds thus saving the cost of replacing expensive double glazing. (Of course all bets were off if the storm took the roof off, lol!) We got quite a nice discount on our homeowners for having those.

Back in 'the olden days' people made do with a set of interior-exterior heavy plank wooden shutters, those also worked wonderfully to protect window glass and the people inside.

All those X taped windows you see when people are preparing for a storm? Doesn't do a dang thing except give a slim hope that when something shatters the glass the shards won't be big enough/small enough to inflict a fatal wound to a living being. Storm shutters work, doesn't matter if you can afford nothing more than marine grade plywood - shutters work!
December 16, 2013 at 11:53pm        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
J Petempich
@chookchook Here is a cabinet that I asked for legs but for some reason they just floated it. It was more work for them. I like something high enough to clean under.
December 17, 2013 at 2:06am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
sunnie2day
Off-topic, JPetempich, that's GORGEOUS!!! Everything, the entire room!
December 17, 2013 at 2:11am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Yes, lovely.
December 17, 2013 at 2:16am     
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
J Petempich
Thanks you, it means a lot to me, I need confidence in many of the things I do.
December 17, 2013 at 2:27am        Thanked by chookchook2
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Great work so far, any insights on Asian solutions?
December 17, 2013 at 7:03pm   
Thank you for reporting this. Undo
chookchook2
Hello folks!
December 21, 2013 at 7:12am   
Sign Up to comment
More Discussions
Let's play with my Snazzy Garottage project
We're building a carriage house (we prefer the term...
Help with colours for dining room table and console table!!
Hi! We need to buy a dining table set (to replace the...
Lantern lighting
How do you determine correct size necessary for lantern...
Gap between fence and hardscaping-HELP
I have a small area behind my house that I want to...
What could go with Acacia cocktail table?
I just purchased this lift away coffee table, it is...
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™