Luxury vinyl planks (LVP) or laminate?
greengirl
December 30, 2013 in Design Dilemma
Can't afford the tile we want. Haven't found any in our budget. Wood is also really high here (FL) and also discouraged.

So we then thought laminate. But there is so much negativity out there on this product. At showroom, saw a product on the floor. Couldn't believe it was vinyl.

We're not young, but must get rid of 1988 peach carpeting. Yes, I'm afraid, very afraid. But carpet must go.

As we all know, no matter what one person loves, ie peach carpeting, a buyer will most likely want something else. So we thought it would be just that much easier to do what is right for us now. Butno one seems to be answering any of the discussions posted here. Please help us all.
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libradesigneye
LVP - great look, wears like iron, go for it.
December 30, 2013 at 10:25PM     
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PRO
Lampert Dias Architects, Inc.
Armstrong has a wonderful vinyl that looks like real wood. It even comes with a grain texture. We have used it in commercial installations and it is holding up very well and no one can tell that it isn't real wood.....
December 30, 2013 at 11:13PM     
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bubbasgma
greengirl....What kind of sub-floor do you have? Did you see the links i posted for you on another thread? I love vinyl plank. Have had it in my kitchen from way way back. Now looking to redo our lower level basement and are definitely doing LVP.
December 30, 2013 at 11:20PM     
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bubbasgma
I had better luck doing research at these 2 sites than here on Houzz.
http://www.thefloorpro.com/community/vinyl-flooring-q-and-a/
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/flooring/
December 30, 2013 at 11:22PM     
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greengirl
@bubbasgsma Thanx for the links. Look to be very helpful.
December 31, 2013 at 11:18AM     
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greengirl
That's @bubbasgma
December 31, 2013 at 11:19AM     
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intelinside1
Vinyl plank is great for long term wear. Laminate in general isn't as durable unless you go for the expensive ones. A lot of the LVP are waterproof where the laminate often has that MDF underneath

LVP can be pricey though.

You also need to make sure that subfloor is flat and sound with either
December 31, 2013 at 11:24AM     
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bubbasgma
greengirl-There are several methods of application.
glue-down.
click-together.
tape-strip on the side.
looselay/freefit.

The best for your situation will depend on your subfloor, your budget, the type of traffic you expect, how waterproof you need it. Small independent flooring stores are usually the most knowledgeable even if they may not have the cheapest product.
December 31, 2013 at 11:39AM     
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PRO
Cancork Floor Inc.
Greengirl - luxury vinyl tiles/planks come in two different styles. The highest quality is always 100% vinyl = water proof. The "other" type is a layer of vinyl mounted on a fiberboard (should be HDF...but some places in USA do not HAVE TO because they do not follow CARB requirements...not the point). These "vinyl on fibreboard" floors have issues with water/delamination. My company gave it a go with this type of product only to find out the hardway that the "vinyl + HDF" is a very difficult combination to get right. Most companies don't get it right OR they have to use some serious forms of solvent based adhesives to get the product to stick to one another.

The LVT that is 100% vinyl is an excellent product with a few issues when it gets too hot - like in direct sunlight. In Germany (LVT has been around for 4-6 years in Europe...so they are seeing some "aging" issues that just aren't available to American consumers = product is too new to find out any concerns).

Some of the floating vinyl planks will warp and "uncouple" when exposed to direct sunlight. The solution the Germans have for this is: double stick underlay. The underlay is stuck to the subfloor and then the adhesive is exposed (you peel back the paper off the surface) and then you click AND GLUE the vinyl into place. This has solved the warping/uncoupling problems they have seen in Europe.

The LVT quality is directly related to the thickness AND the price. The thicker/pricier the product the more likely you are to find LVT to endure. The "vinyl + HDF" is a great product...so long as you understand it's limitations.

Just my two-cents worth.
December 31, 2013 at 11:40AM     
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hayleydaniels
Ultimately you need to go with what you can afford, and what will work in your circumstances. It's YOUR house, and if vinyl planks are what you can afford, I'm sure you'll be happy with it. And just so you don't feel too bad, I'm going to be putting in a laminate countertop as there's no way I can realistically afford quartz or granite.
December 31, 2013 at 11:45AM     
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mfwolfe
Good answers here. Only one thing to add: when you are doing price comparisons, get the price for the product installed. Some stores will be reluctant because they have to come to your house and measure, but getting the installed price makes sure there aren't any add-ons that you aren't informed of when you are just chatting in the store. It happened to me. Still satisfied with the product, just not too happy with the business practice.
December 31, 2013 at 3:23PM     
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PRO
Linda
Underlayment for the laminate adds considerably to the price.

The luxury vinyl planks are a nice looking product but the better quality materials aren't any cheaper than tile per sq ft of material. The installation cost of the vinyl is much cheaper
December 31, 2013 at 3:43PM     
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greengirl
Thanks, everyone.

@bubbasgma the subfloor is cement. And I went to the other websites. Very informative. The pricing we are getting will include install. I will have them do a breakdown. The sales lady did the initial measure which she said is then verified by the installer.

I have learned so much that I think I hurt my neck from spinning. But I have decided to definitely go this route. I like it much better than laminate. We are going to look at an install of the Transcend at the home this company recently installed. It's over 2k sf.

I'm concerned about the sunlight comment. I'm in FL. I will reread what you have said many times and discuss with sales, etc. ok, the quest continues.
January 1, 2014 at 9:16PM     
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bubbasgma
Glad you found some answers. I'm not familiar with Transcend, will check that out. I am below grade on cement slab too. But going over old asbestos tiles and asbestos mastic. Have been "testing" Karndean LooseLay planks as we are demo-ing and I couldn't be more impressed! Good luck!
January 1, 2014 at 9:28PM     
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greengirl
From what I've read etc., I'm believing glue down on top of our concrete floor is best. Is that correct? It's weird cause the prices we've gotten so far are higher for floating than glue down. I'm not sure why.
January 23, 2014 at 12:19AM   
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PRO
Marroquin Construction Corporation
This quest quarters renovation was completed a little over two years ago. The subfloor in this application was plywood. Extensive leveling was required to ensure that we did not get pattern transfer due to seams, wood distortion, and screw head holes. This glue down LVP floor really was the best choice for the application. Customers love the ease of maintenance.
January 23, 2014 at 1:24AM     
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PRO
Marroquin Construction Corporation
In the end the price comes out about the same. Glue down requires more labor in the surface prep time and a higher skill level to install. However, I personally prefer a glue down installation rather than hearing the “tinny sound” of a floating floor when walked on.
There are several factors used to determine if a concrete surface is suitable for a glue down floor. Moisture levels, cracks, PH issues all get factored in to make the final determination on selecting the best flooring material.
last Friday at 8:56AM   
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