British people also call household items by different names!

Emmeline WestinApril 2, 2014
With Houzz UK launching shortly, we've been thinking about how us Brits use different words for household items than our American and Aussie friends.

How about flat (apartment), rubbish bin (trash can) and BBQ (grill or Barbie)?

Do you have any other favourites? Can you think of other examples?

Richmond, 1930's refurbishment · More Info
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Victoria Harrison
I love discovering all the subtle differences in word use! A recent discovery was that Americans call a kitchen splashback a 'backsplash'
11 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 2:16AM
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Thos. Baker
The British refer to the restroom as the Loo, while Americans call it the bathroom. Brits put their cars in the garage to get them fixed and Americans put their cars in the garage to protect them. When they're amazed, the Brits are gobsmacked. Now that's a great word!

Christi, on behalf of Thos. Baker
9 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 2:34AM
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Emmeline Westin
Aluminium is my favourite, I used to get so confused when my American flatmate said 'aluminum' :)
7 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 2:57AM
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OnePlan
here in UK our 'pillows' are the things we have to rest our heads on in bed - it seems in US, pillows are what we would call scatter cushions, on a sofa or chair !
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 5:50AM
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Eliza Jane Darling
Off the top of my head: loo, loo roll, bog, bog roll, kitchen roll, washing-up liquid, clingfilm, bin, cooker, hob, loft (for "attic"), tap, skip (for "dumpster"), telly, flannel (for "washcloth"), cupboard (for "closet"), let (for "rent"), bedsit, lift (for "elevator"), boiler (for "furnace"), council house, tower block, spanner (for "wrench"), hoover (for "vacuum cleaner"), pram, pushchair, tinned (for "canned"). The one that always gets me is GARage rather that garAGE. The husband is British and we lived there for ages; now that we're back in the States I forget how to pronounce that and wind up mangling it completely.

If you added in food, it would be a long list indeed.
10 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 7:02AM
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Eliza Jane Darling
And the ground floor thing. One country counts the ground floor as floor 0, and one counts it as floor 1. I forget which is which.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 7:05AM
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sunnie2day
LOL, Eliza Jane Darling you beat me to it - skip!

In the US during a reno they use a ' Dipsy Dumpster' (skip) and then the truck (lorrie) comes for the skip for a trip to the landfill (tip) OR they load it all in the truck ( but this time they mean their pick-up) and drive it to the landfill themselves. Very confusing:)

And I'm still trying to get it across to people that the kettle and the teapot are two different items altogether:)

Let's not forget kettle is NOT a teapot, cookers are what the Americans call their ranges and just try explaining the concept of a cooktop: Next there are worktops which in the US are called counters or countertops.

In the convenience/facility/lav/washroom or WC for powder room (instead of the general bathroom and ladies never call it the loo, btw), the vanity is often called the sink and refers to the hand wash basin AND the vanity top.

I'm American and British, btw, raised between both countries although living here in Scotland permanently now:)
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 7:20AM
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Advent Home Solutions Inc
In UK the 1st floor of a building is up one from the ground level. The pavement is where the pedestrians walk (ie. sidewalk) whereas in North America if I were to walk on the pavement I would probably be run down by the cars ... in UK the "pavement" or road surface is known as the "tarmac". Confused ... you will be ;-)
Originally from Scotland and transplanted in Canada.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 7:20AM
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taffyduck
I'm a Brit in Canada and here's my 'reno' translation list
Coving = ceiling trim
Chippy = carpenter
Sparky = Electrician
Brickie = Bricklayer/Contractor
Dump = City Refuse

And as a tip, if you ever hire a British contractor, always offer them a "cup of tea and biscuits"... You'll be guaranteed the best service ever!
11 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 7:33AM
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Jessica
I suspect if you are sewing you'll find a few differences as well, draperies/drapes/curtains, shears/scissors, and twine/thread/twist....

You'll select colours instead of colors for paint.

Of course my favorite was what my grandfather called umbrellas - bumbershoots!

You might look into the glass instead of the mirror...

My mother taught high school English literature so most of the books I had growing up were from her library. I used to get in trouble on spelling tests at school because I'd often spell things the British way instead of the American way since all the books I was reading were spelled British!
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 8:18AM
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sunnie2day
Thank-you for the reminder, Jessica! Yes, in the US I sewed custom draperies, here in the UK I sew bespoke curtains. I also made other home decor items like pot holders, napkins, tea and coffee cozies whereas here I make other soft furnishings - hot pads and oven gloves, serviettes, and tea cosies:)
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 8:45AM
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sunnie2day
Yikes, just remembered a few more - cutlery in the UK for the American flatware or silverware, and crockery or tableware in the UK for the American very simple 'dishes' used in context depending.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 8:47AM
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ASVInteriors
faucet = tap
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 8:51AM
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mefor
I always say cutlery and people always think it's strange :)
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 8:52AM
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mefor
Don't ask for spotted dick for your dessert here in US.
11 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 8:55AM
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John James O'Brien - Design for Inspired Living
Brollie is the short form for umbrella, a dump is a tip, the equivalent of "loo" is the North American "can" and in a business sense--I would avoid both in favour of toilet (the room, not the article, or bathroom, which may not, overseas, include the toilet. Interesting thread, this!
1 Like    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 9:16AM
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Vivienne Sung
Powder room is more likely to be cloakroom, mud room would be utility room or laundry room, backyard would be garden
1 Like    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 9:21AM
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bubblyjock
Be careful suggesting you knock up the brickie, too.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 9:55AM
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ASVInteriors
ha ha mforr - nor "toad in the hole" or "bubble and squeak!"
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 9:58AM
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Jessica
Don't forget to dump your dust-bin into the wheelie-bin to take for the dustmen to pick up. You can also get these cool wheelie bin covers that I wish we had in the USA: http://www.wheelie-bin-covers.co.uk/
1 Like    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 10:17AM
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Jessica
Oh and yikes, I just remembered everything in USA is English inches, yards, etc. While in the UK they use metric!
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 10:20AM
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ASVInteriors
The UK hasn't quite fully crossed over - it mixes metric and imperial for various things - you just have to know which!
6 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 10:26AM
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Jessica
Of course, with all the dialects of American English ( http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2013/12/02/what-dialect-to-do-you-speak-a-map-of-american-english/ ), you will find some more or less like the UK version of a few centuries ago: http://www.wvculture.org/history/journal_wvh/wvh30-2.html
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 10:43AM
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The Rey3 Design Collaborative
Very true. Noticed that while I was in London and admiring different spaces etc. Regardless of the language barrier if we can call it that LOL. This is a gorgeous room!!.
    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 10:56AM
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bevcourt
In the North of England "amazement" can be expressed as "Well, I'll go to Smethwick" (pronounced "Smeth ick"). I don't get it either! Or "I'll go to the foot of our stairs"!
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 10:59AM
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shelleyuk
We don't really say BBQ though do we? I've never heard anyone say B B Q. We just write it that way.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 11:34AM
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Jessica
Shelleyuk, I've heard it said "Bah-Bee-Que" which is pretty close! The thing people from outside the deep south often don't understand is that there IS a difference between grilling and barbequeing and both are different from smoking! And indeed there are multiple styles of BBQ - vinegar based, mustard based, dry rubs, or tomato based to name a few! Going to a pig picken' will be different from attending a pit beef bbq... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbecue

Something else - most of my mother's guests from the UK have never eaten using their hands as utensils! My father had a ball teaching them all how to eat corn on the cob which might be called Maize in the UK.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 11:56AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Cot for crib, portable bed for cot, self-catering holiday flat for vacation apartment with kitchen facilities (or kitchenette)--gotten myself in trouble overseas for not knowing the difference. Never quite figured out a bedsit--is that like a room in a boarding house? I'm sure there are others I can't remember, like the term for having some or all meals included With a package vacation.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 12:00PM
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sunnie2day
Bedsit=studio unit:)
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Jessica
I do have to say we were all amused by one of our UK guests...I've mentioned in other discussions the accidents that occur in front of my parent's home, and on one occasion we had visitors from the UK who happened to be sitting in the living room and witnessed one such crash. While my father went out to see if there were survivors and Mom called 911 for police and an ambulance, our guests went into a tizzy because no one had run out to offer a hot cup of tea to the victims!
15 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 12:06PM
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shelleyuk
We do say barbecue (not B B Q though). Corn on the cob was not cry common here until relatively recently. We more frequently eat sweetcorn (maize) as a pile of individual kernels.

A bedsit is like a studio apartment. One room and a bathroom usually. No separate kitchen.

We would call a US cot a camp bed (or a lilo if its inflatable)
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 12:06PM
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sunnie2day
@Jessica - I lived in the US Deep South (AL, GA, LA, and NW FL) from 1975 through my relocation to Scotland, sounds as though you're in NC? (pig-pickin', a term I only heard in NC although it was spreading to the Piedmont area of SC last time I was there;)

We call it corn here - when my veg patch hasn't granted me the joy of fresh picked cobs I can go down to Tesco or Waitrose and buy it frozen, labelled as...corn.

I've got my very Scottish husband hooked on sweet corn on the cob although we both do use a very sharp knife to cut the kernels from the cob, even if I've roasted it on the barbie.
6 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 12:11PM
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OnePlan
tea is a way of keeping a person that's in an accident but 'walking wounded' in one place. It can calm them, gives them something to do and makes them feel as though they are being looked after ... it's a bit like a hug in a mug - and can allow someone of a caring nature to feel that they have in someway helped someone who needed it ! so can be beneficial for both the walking wounded and the shocked bystander alike !
17 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 12:42PM
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momof5x
Milkman- the man who brings a milk cart vehicle and delivers milk straight from the farms to your home, he also sells you fresh orange juice, and eggs. You have to leave your empty milk bottles outside the door in the morning with a tag that goes over the neck of bottle, stating how many bottles of milk you want- not sure if this is still done now and days.

Postman- delivers mail directly to the door.

Back kitchen-located at back of the house near back door which exits usually into the backyard.

paper-shop- is the shop where you usually buy your daily newspaper, it also is a candy ( sweets in UK) shop.

outdoor market- open market that comes out on the streets on the weekends.

Indoor market- sheltered market

Lavatory- bathroom/restroom/toilet/ WC

ironmongers= hardware store

Fishmongers = a retailer that sells fish

Greengrocers= a retail shop selling fruits and vegetables

Coal shed= a small planked wooden shed used to store coal for the fire.

Chemist= a pharmacy

Skirting boards =baseboard ( a wooden board covering the lowest part of a wall)

Loft=attic

Celler=basement ( there can be very smaller cellers where people keep their electric meter and there can be large cellars)

Pavement=walkway

Moterway=highway


Zebra crossing=pedestrian crossing

( there are loads of differences !)
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 12:59PM
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Jessica
Sunny2day I was born and raised in Maryland. My mother's from Pennsylvania, father's from Kentucky. I went to boarding academy in Virginia, college in Michigan, spent summer vacation with family in North Carolina, and Florida. While I was married, my ex husband's school and work caused us to live in California, Mississippi, and Virginia. So I have a hodgepodge of language to choose from!
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 4:01PM
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debsurreal
One of my favorite British terms is 'nappies' for diapers.

The states are equally as confusing with our vernacular. Living in Louisiana I remember grocery carts referred to as 'buggies' and the trunk of a car was a 'turtle top.'
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 4:15PM
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Jessica
Grocery carts are buggies in Mississippi and Alabama also.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 4:18PM
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Jessica
Oneplan, if you tried to offer someone who just crashed their car in my yard something hot to drink, you would be lucky if they only doused you with it and smashed the mug on the blacktop. Most folks in my part of the world are extremely suspicious of what you might have added to it which is why local hospitals do free Xrays of Halloween candy before parents allow the children to eat any. Most people who have crashed are extremely belligerent and dangerous to approach unless they are so badly injured they can't attack you. Many of the accidents occur because the driver is intoxicated on drugs or alcohol. It's safer to let the police or ambulance crew do the first approach.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 4:25PM
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chookchook2
Heavens to Betsy in a basket!
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 2, 2014 at 5:27PM
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OnePlan
Oh that's so sad Jessica !!! What a shame - it's not like that over here at all ! Here we'd drop what we were doing and do what we could to help.
8 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:49AM
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shewasanicegirl
The Loo instead of bathroom
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:16AM
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moirav
In the UK avoid using 'fanny', rubber = eraser, packet = bag, trolley = cart.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 4:54AM
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Steve Rickard
Zed for Z, pissed is drunk instead of angry.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 5:03AM
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auntiebuzzybee
I do hope that people around the world don't come to the conclusion that Americans involved in automobile accidents are generally drunk, belligerent and dangerous. Of course I do not know about the number of accidents in front of Jessica's house but I'm quite sure that the majority of accidents nationwide do not involve alcohol or drugs. Thank God, many concerned citizens have come to the aid of crash victims and been instrumental in saving lives. Then again, there are those few that turn the other cheek because it's not their concern to get their hands dirty. To leave the impression that Americans who are known for helping everybody the world over as being this callous is terribly insensitive and simply WRONG.
9 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 5:07AM
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mefor
I can't imagine not coming to the aid of someone who might have had an accident in front of me. Of course you go and try to help them, calm them, if it's in front of your house, wouldn't you bring a blanket to warm someone and help with the shock that might be setting in? I don't think that the Brits would have chased the people around the street with a steaming hot cup of tea, screaming at them to drink it, LOL :)
7 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 5:22AM
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stryker
I have never witnessed an accident where multiple people did not go running to see if they could help. I live in the southern US. But there are good parts and bad parts in every region of the world (well, some are just flat out bad), and it sounds like Jessica's neck of the woods is quite dangerous.
7 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 5:59AM
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stryker
A tea story:
When hubs and I were in Morocco we stopped at a gas station to fill up the car. The attendant asked if we would like the "super" gasoline. Hubs said no, thinking that the attendant was just trying to get more money out of us. The attendant said, "you really need super." Hubs said no. So "regular" gas (turpentine?) went into the tank and off we went. Half way down the block, the car is coughin' and kickin' and spittin' and cussin'. We pulled into the next gas station. All workers there flocked to our aid. They had to mouth pipette the gas out and change some engine parts.
To soothe our nerves, the manager went to make us some "Moroccan whiskey." Mint tea. I walked toward him to ask if I could use the bathroom and he looks up: "Noooo!" I was walking on freshly poured concrete. So then half the workers were fixing the concrete I messed up and the other half were fixing the car we were too cheap to put proper gas in. The manager still smiled and handed us our tea.
13 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 6:17AM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Normal tea is called 'builders tea' and it is good manners to make all of your tradies tea whenever they come to your house.
8 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 6:24AM
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mefor
Hi Rachelle, have you painted your house and/or built pergola/overhang?
Funny that people here don't usually give the workers tea or coffee, when I offer it, most of them are flabbergasted.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 6:30AM
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mefor
Colonial homes had them, close to kitchen, near the fireplace or with another fireplace of its own. Sort of an old fashioned sitting room or den where the family gathered, kept warm and socialized and did their indoor recreational activities like reading, sewing and things like that.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 7:42AM
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katkooti
When I first moved to the US from UK my sister in law was decorating their house and hanging pictures and are. I said I would help and she asked me to hand her the "Molly Bolt" I looked amazed as we call it a " Raw Plug!" She laughed but i thought it sounded stew-pid.. What is a bloomim' Molly? Lol
I also remember asking her where my nephew's pushchair= Stroller was so i could take him for a Walkie!:)
I learned it was not a Nappy but a diapy.. Ha ha

You don't "take the piss" in US lingo its considered very rude you make fun!! Ad if you're pissed u r angry not drunk..
You don't feel puckish if u r a little hungry..
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 7:57AM
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nasmijati
To add to mforr's definition of keeping room: A room at the back of a colonial New England house, which served as a combination kitchen, living room, and workroom.
    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 8:06AM
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Alan Kosa Interiors
I recently was at a design presentation where "Martin Lawrence Bullard" spoke of how he started his interest in design. He spoke of "Boot" sales which we typically refer to as a Garage or Yard sale here in the US.however I love the use of the word "Posh". Very charming.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 8:08AM
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kimdee24
It's "cutlery" in Canada also.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 8:08AM
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Jessica
Bsellers1394, just in case anyone got the wrong idea from my earlier posts, I'd like to point out that we do check to see if there are injuries and we call for an ambulance in every single case of an accident in front of my parents home. Our experience over the years has been that probably 70% of the accidents are caused by alcohol or some other intoxicant, the others are primarily due to bad weather conditions such as rain or snow, and an extreme few have been instances where someone intended to hit their brake and instead hit the gas and ran off the road doing doughnuts in people's yards. We have an average of 6 major accidents a year and multiple instances of people skidding off the road and through the yard doing no damage beyond tearing up the turf and continuing on their way.

The best thing that we can do is activate the Emergency Medical Services by calling 911 so they get there as quickly as possible and generally arrive within 10-15 minutes and are prepared to deal with head, neck and back injuries. My father is a retired Respiratory Therapist and I am also trained in first aid and CPR I work in a hospital. In most cases there is nothing we can do for these individuals other than try to stop them from moving around and potentially doing more damage. We are not ignoring the victims or being insensitive. We do what we were trained to do in First Aid and CPR classes.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 8:31AM
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shelleyuk
They're "rawlplugs" but its actually a trade name that's stuck rather than the name of the object which is a wall plug. Bit like the way we tend to call any vacuum cleaner a hoover. Even the dyson and the Henry are called hoovers in this house.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 8:36AM
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John James O'Brien - Design for Inspired Living
Do the Brits call napkins serviettes, as we do in Canada?
7 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 8:52AM
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OnePlan
And when we go out to eat in a restaurant when we are finished we ask for the bill and sometimes pay with a cheque ( not so much nowadays - as most of us pay with plastic )

( I think I'm right in saying in US you'd ask for the check and pay with a bill?!?)
7 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:00AM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Hi Mforr, when we did our garage conversion my friends were flabbergasted that i didn't make any of my builders tea the whole time! I'm an Aussie immigrant so i didn't know (and plus they had a little shed with electricity so they could've really had a kettle there...). But anyway i have learned. No painting or pergola yet! All windows are done, down lights are in the middle of being done, paving scheduled in 4 weeks, built-in desk/cupboard for study going in about a month and now organising the back fence to be re-built. So things are moving slowly but surely :)
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:06AM
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Unconscious On Canvas
I wanted to buy a curling iron for my bangs when I was in the UK - but apparently what I wanted there was a styling tong for my fringe.
13 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:10AM
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janjustme
Rachelle, I'm an Aussie in rural Australia and I still offer the builders or repairmen a cuppa. If they're lucky, they get scones too. For 'lucky', read, do a good job! I recently made tea and scones for a couple of young blokes and they couldn't believe it. It must be a dying custom here in Australia.
7 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:13AM
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mefor
That's great Rachelle, I'm glad you're pushing forward. That's a lot you have going on. I hope you'll maybe post some pics on your old thread when you're all done, love to see the transformation. :)
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:46AM
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mefor
Jessica, I don't think anyone meant for you to care for injured people. We were just talking about the people who are a bit shook up and waiting for some help. No worries, none of us were singling you out, just saying that here in the states, many people would be there to hold a hand or offer some calming words.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:51AM
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shelleyuk
Garden oaks. Over here they're napkins if they're made of fabric, serviettes or paper napkins if they're made of paper.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:55AM
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janjustme
Thanks mforr, now I know what a "Keeping Room" is. I deleted my question before I realised I had an answer for it. I wondered if it was polite for an Aussie to be butting in on a Trans Atlantic discussion.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 9:56AM
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victorianbungalowranch
Is a "snug" similar to a keeping room--like a cozy little sitting area for a cup of tea near the kitchen?

My husband and I sometimes have to put on the subtitles to catch what folks are saying on British shows on PBS, especially for thick working class accents and slang. Sometimes I don't have a clue what they are saying. Same for the deep South though.

So do folks over there still say "Brilliant!" when they think something you said is terrific? And is "Laters" just something they say on "The Café" or is it common for "See You Later" which I thought was an American thing. Just wondered.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 10:10AM
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mefor
I think it is very similar, isn't that a lovely name? Snug, such a comfy connotation :))
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 10:35AM
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John James O'Brien - Design for Inspired Living
Growing up, my playroom was, by default, the box room ... this seems to have come from allocation of a room to store luggage, various boxed items. Perhaps that's where one kept everything to get ready for Boxing Day (which, of course, has nothing to do with WWF and everything to do with the day after Christmas).

BTW, here in Victoria, BC, one of our favourite haunts after a hard slog at uni was THe Snug, a very civilized lounge (bar) at the old 1920s-30s Oak Bay Beach Hotel. The hotel, and the snug, have a new life...happy for the family, but I rather prefer the old!
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 10:39AM
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bschr
Growing up in Canada as a product of English and Irish parents we never ate corn on the cob and I still haven't developed the skill for eating it on the cob. However I will remove the kernels with a sharp knife and use my cutlery. I also grew up calling my couch a chesterfield.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:28AM
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Jessica
Mforr, thanks. I just didn't want there to be confusion! Sometimes it is easy to dash off a message in a hurry on these discussions and come back later to realize that perhaps you could have said something more clearly or more tactfully. I've also come to realize that on occasion my auto-speller has sabotaged me and made what I typed mean something entirely different than what I intended it to. I didn't intend to come across as callous, but when I re-read the message I realized it could be taken that way. My point was not to say we ignore the needs of the victims, because we don't. My original purpose was simply to indicate that the reaction to run out with a cup of hot tea was very different than we would have. We have had instances where the individuals were so intoxicated that they attacked anyone who came near them and the police had to restrain them so their injuries could be treated. Thus we try to assess the situation the way we were trained to in emergencies. You can't help anyone if you end up being a victim too. That house is in Prince George's County, Maryland, which has a high crime rate. On at least one occasion the wreck was some guys trying to escape the police at high speed after robbing 3 gas stations at gun point. They exited the wrecked vehicle and tried to hijack another car at gun point. I can only imagine how they'd have reacted if you ran out and tried to offer them tea or a blanket.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:35AM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Janjustme- it seems like such a polite thing to do doesn't it? I don't know why but it just didn't enter my head before i was told about 'builders tea'. I must have appeared so rude! Now i am extra vigilant to make up for my past thoughtlessness :) p.s i think i prefer the british pronunciation of 'scones' (rhymes with bones) rather than the Aussie (rhymes with bons).

Mforr- Whats the straightforward way to get back to ones old thread? It is not under the 'your houzz' section. I usually get back by finding past emails and clicking on the links... any chance you could enlighten me?
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:49AM
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mefor
Here's the link to the one with the house

http://www.houzz.com/discussions/340204/Please-help-make-my-ugly-house-pretty-

If you go to your profile page you can see all your activity, go to your posts, I think there is 32 in the list, and this one was the last because it was the earliest. But you can access all your posts there :))
    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 12:06PM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Thanks mforr- I bet some peoples activity feed is very very long!

Perhaps it would be an improvement if there were an extra item added to the drop down list in 'your houzz', for example, 'your design dilemmas' for easier access to ones own project dilemmas.

I hope that when Houzz is 'tailored' (UK or Aus) the users in those countries still have access to everything across all continents. I really enjoy the inspiration that a global app like Houzz can create and users quickly adapt to household item names; i think that the ease of different ideas being spread across nations is why it is so successful.

Question for Houzz administrators- Is the proposed tailoring going to be limited to the known different names for items just being implemented in the back end within the business rules around mapping for search items etc and perhaps targeted advertising? Or is Houzz going to be fundamentally & visibly changing in the front end for UK/Aus users? I hope it is just the former.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 12:41PM
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stryker
I sure hope we don't all get segmented off from each other. I like this global community we've got going.
10 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 1:03PM
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mefor
They've said that won't happen, and I sincerely hope they don't, I love the interaction on here.
Rachelle, if you "bookmark" a discussion at the beginning of a thread, there's an option that will come up on your profile page that says "bookmarks" then you can just look at that page and all the threads you know you want to look at again will be on there. :)
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 1:27PM
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John James O'Brien - Design for Inspired Living
I also appreciate the sense of global community (and like many Canadians, like that we can be recognized as such when so many sites force the US-Canada identify despite our very, very different {albeit mostly complementary} qualities)! As someone who works internationally, I find it very difficult to cope with systems that think they are "smart" and limit content based on a presumed interest or locale. "Smart" technology can backfire.
8 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 1:37PM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Okay thanks Mforr, i had a look 'Your Houzz' and there is an option to 'get the bookmarklet'. If this is what you are referring to (and i don't think it is) then it says that it adds the 'add to idea book' bookmark on the bookmark bar which does not really serve the purpose. Do you mean just add it as a normal bookmark from your browser? Or is 'bookmark' listed somewhere else in the Houzz menu bar?
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 1:56PM
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mefor
Hi rachelle :)
If you look at the top of this thread, under the picture there's a spot that says bookmark, if you click on it, it will add it to your "bookmarks" which will then show up on your profile page. Nothing shows there until you actually book ark something. This is where you find it in a thread you are interested in, whether it's yours or someone else's that you want to keep up with and don't want to search for.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:04PM
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mefor
After you bookmark something, look at your profile, in the spot next to 7 ideabooks and 36 posts will be a new tab that says 1 bookmark. But it won't show until you bookmark something :)
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:08PM
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K. Brown
I'm a Texan :) We say "I'm fixin' to go to the grocery store" instead of "I'm getting ready to go to the grocery store".
Great topic!
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:09PM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Okay success. Granted it works and the extra tab automatically appeared. Still would be better if there was a 'your design dilemmas' option in Your Houzz IMO :)
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:12PM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
LOL Katherine! "Fixin" makes it sounds like you are on some drug making you hyper.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:14PM
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mefor
Then she would be "fixin' to go see her connection", lol :))
My hubby says fixin' too, born in Texas, the big lug :)
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:20PM
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mefor
Glad it worked, until they put in that option and a couple more that I'd love to see, report dilemma and report profile, for all the nonsense that keeps appearing on houzz every few days, I guess it will have to do :))
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:22PM
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tessybear100
I think I'm right in saying that a night stand is a bedside table.
    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:24PM
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shelleyuk
We do say bedside cabinet or table. A snug is what you would call a den? A small cozy room for snuggling up and watching tv or reading. We do still say brilliant. Only those in the West Country say "laters" Its very much a regional thing. Ive never heard anyone say it in real life
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:38PM
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Mary Albert
I once had to share a room at a hotel in London and kept asking for a 'cot' and they kept asking me over and over again "are you sure you need a cot?", "yes, yes", there is one more person we are adding to the room. Unfortunately, a 'cot" in the UK is actually a baby crib - oops!
6 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 2:54PM
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tessybear100
I know another one a flannel is a wash cloth!
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:07PM
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mefor
Has anyone said trainers for sneakers yet?
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:08PM
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mefor
Laters Shelley. ;D
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:09PM
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cazzerole
I am loving this conversation :-)
In the UK we call pacifiers dummies.
The hood of a car is the bonnet and the trunk is the boot.
A couch is a sofa, a grocery cart is a trolley.
A purse is a handbag and a wallet is a purse.
A flat is an apartment and a block of flats is equivalent to a condo and a half bath is a cloakroom
A bum is a hobo in the US but here it means buttocks and a hobo is a tramp.
A&E or casualty department is your ER.
A casket is a coffin
An Asian here is someone from the Indian sub-continent, but it means of Chinese decent in the US
A cowboy here is a bad tradesman
A journal is a diary
An elevator is a lift

Whenever I have tradesmen in they always get plenty of tea and coffee and sausage or bacon sarnies (sandwiches) the trouble is they never want to go home lol, but I do get very good service.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:12PM
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bevcourt
Hello fellow Houzzers! I am a carer and much too tired to comment on all your feeds except to say, here in England, if you don't give your builders copious amounts of tea pretty much nothing gets done!!
6 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:29PM
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K. Brown
@ Rachelle its a Texas thang :)
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:36PM
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Design Lighting
I love this thread! As a Canadian, I find it interesting how in general we tend to use the same words as Americans (granted, Northern Americans), but when it comes to spelling, we love throwing in those extra u's in words like favour and neighbour just like the British do.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 3:39PM
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stryker
Unless it's a one night stand.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 4:33PM
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Victoria
Being from the UK West Country, but living in Outer London, I would say laters is not from the West, first time I ever heard it was years ago and it was someone from the South East. Don't hear it often now.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 4:53PM
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Angel18432
My fave is WellyBobs - another name for Wellington Boots (or rain boots)
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 5:23PM
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janjustme
Rachelle - yes, making tea for the workers does seem a more pleasant way of going about things. There has only been one time in my reasonably long life that I have resented doing it and another when I didn't offer at all as the fellow made the hair on the back of my neck stand on end! There are always exceptions to the rule.
With the link mfrr put up, Rachelle, I peeked at your post about making your home in England more handsome. I look forward to seeing your news update, with pics.

May I add my voice to mfrr, Garden Oaks in Canada and others and say how much I enjoy the 'one site fits all' and hearing from people all over the world.
10 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 5:48PM
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tessybear100
My friend married a girl from Dallas and they live here in UK. Her name is Randy but she got so many sniggers when she said her name that she changed it to Sandy!
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:06PM
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tessybear100
Also the expression going out to have a fag still causes raised eyebrows with my US friends.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:08PM
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chookchook2
British song


http://www.victorianweb.org/mt/parlorsongs/2.html
    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:34PM
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tessybear100
Very appropriate and lyrics by an American!
    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:48PM
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tessybear100
Chock chook I see you are from Australia and budgie smugglers come straight to mind!
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:50PM
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ASVInteriors
Oh and one more... - while a shag carpet is a "fluffy" carpet, a shag (let you work it out) is also something that is usually followed by a fag....(cigarette)
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 3, 2014 at 11:59PM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Angel18432- 'WellyBobs' are the short ankle height wellington boots.
Mary Albert- That is very unusual, I've never heard a 'cot' being called a 'crib' over here in the UK, its always been a 'cot'. They are called 'cots' in all the shops. Could've been the area i suppose or if the hotel staff were foreign? How bizarre to not even know & comprehend the word 'cot' even if you preferred to call it a 'crib'- i find that really confusing :/ Maybe they were being simple or more likely deliberately obtuse.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 12:06AM
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tessybear100
No I think when she said cot she meant a portable bed for herself.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 12:12AM
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ASVInteriors
Watching MTV Cribs in the US I quickly realized they were showing homes and not families with glorified baby cots!!!
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 12:16AM
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chookchook2
I'm a one piece girl myself.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 12:29AM
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tessybear100
...and do you wear thongs with it ? ;)
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 12:44AM
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rinqreation
Chippy and Sparky??
Hahahahahaha! I just chuckled, I studied furniture making and my hub used to be an electrician before his current job. New nicknames for both of us!

As a dutch native I love all these language differences, especially the minor ones. In school I learned UK english (hot potato teacher), but US from various tv shows.

When dutch people speak english (in a somewhat evolved way), it often sounds like they're from New York (without the italian sound to it), but that might have been the other way around once..

Over here the first floor is the second in the US, because we say ground floor too (although in dutch). And I had never heard of a powder room before! Over here it's the WC or toilet (and I recall the word restroom from school, long ago).

And I think and measure metric. I always need to recalculate when I play with floorplans on here. Still don't get these feet and inches.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:08AM
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tessybear100
So do you still do that Dutch greeting of the 3 kisses then?
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:17AM
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rinqreation
To friends and family yes.
Others we just shake hands.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:21AM
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rinqreation
I often add a hug to those three kisses :)
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:22AM
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chookchook2
Yup, thongs on my feet.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:26AM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
Tessybear- Ah yes! You are right. My bad and yes i can see the funny side now! Is a 'cot' some kind of fold out bed in the US?
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:46AM
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tessybear100
Yes it is but I had to look it up!
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:53AM
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pariscafe
As a child growing up in London we had a scullery (butler's pantry) and I crossed the zebra crossing to school when the Belisha beacon (cross walk light)said I could. Here in Aus we have zebra crossings but no one thought I was sane when I asked about a Belisha beacon. We used to eat sweeties (candy) and crisps (potato chips) and drank fizzy drinks. We had biscuits for elevenses and pudding ( dessert) for afters.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:14AM
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shelleyuk
Two or three kisses cause lots of awkwardness here. The English way is one kiss (and only if you're close) and that's always what I'd give out but increasingly people go in for a second and even a third. Makes it very awkward if you're not ready for it.

Victoria you may be right. I've only heard "laters" on The Cafe and Doc Martin but maybe its come from TOWIE or something and spread. That programme has a lot to answer for!
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:44AM
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Pauline Fearey
Yard for garden. It's a hardspace in UK but a grassy space in US
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:57AM
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Pauline Fearey
Yard is also a measurement of course - 3feet 3 inches, now mostly replaced by a metre 3 feet. I stll love £sd, 12 pence to the shilling, 20 shillings to the pound, 240 pence to the pound. And thruppeny bits, and half crowns, and10 bob notes. Ah, much more interesting than todays coinage.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 3:05AM
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stryker
Our pennies will go the way of the dodo. If costs keep rising, we'll be paying for everything in Ben Franklins ($100 bills).
    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 4:42AM
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Jessica
Rinqreation, that comment you made about the Dutch sounding "New York" probably comes from the fact that the Hudson Valley of New York was settled in colonial days by the Dutch! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_colonization_of_the_Americas
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 5:35AM
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Jessica
Jeanstryker your comment about pennies disappearing made me think of the scene from The Running Man where they have to put 6 dollars into the soda machine! http://www.econmancer.com/?p=227
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 5:45AM
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Jessica
Pauline, I have several of the British coins that were discontinued and find it sad to lose things like the ha'penny and what bride doesn't want a silver sixpence in her shoe? Here in the US quarters are referred to as "two-bits" although you don't hear it commonly used anymore. It's a reference to when Spanish silver reales were cut into pieces to make change. A "bit" is one eighth of a dollar and since we no longer have coinage in that denomination, the closest is two-bits which is a quarter of a dollar.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 6:00AM
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rinqreation
@Jessica: Yes, about 350 years ago. Might have been fun if that peace treaty was solved in another way. Someone I know has done a travel&study on dutch footprints in the US, mainly the north-east states. Some are even visible today. I like looking into ancestral history (without labeling it good/bad).
    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 6:18AM
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Jessica
rinqreation, I've heard it hypothesized that the reason people from the USA are so much more uptight about things like nude or topless beaches is because the country was originally populated by a bunch of religious extremists (Pilgrims in Massachusetts, Quakers in Pennsylvania, Catholics in Maryland, and others who left Europe due to religious discrimination).
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 6:36AM
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Rachelle Plantagenet
ShellyUK - I thought 'Laters' was a '50 shades of grey' thing?
    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 7:42AM
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farliec
I am originally from the south east of England (now living in Western Australia) and my English friends and I have used the expression "laters" for years. I would also call a nice strong cuppa a brickies brew. I do have one question for the American Houzzers please, which is, what is a pop over? I was once told that pop overs are the National Dish of the UK and was looked at with scorn and derision when I showed no hint of knowing what they are! Is it a Yorkshire pudding (a Yorkie, the savoury thing, not the chocolate bar!).
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:26AM
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farliec
Oh! I also meant to say that in Britain it's a kitchen worktop, in the US it's a countertop.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:29AM
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mefor
yes, popovers are Yorkshire puddings
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:35AM
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1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:37AM
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sarelimur
@farliec Here's a recipe for popovers. They are delicious! http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/popovers-recipe

Also, I think someone said above that a yard measures 3 ft 3 inches. It's actually 3 feet even. A meter is approximately 3' 3".
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:37AM
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Jessica
In the USA a popover is a type of bread that is hollow in the center. Although they can be made in muffin pans it is better to have a dedicated popover pan that has the cups much further apart because they tend to get very large due to the hollow center. Here's a basic recipe: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/basic-popover-recipe.html
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:37AM
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tessybear100
Yes they look exactly like Yorkshire puddings and I have never heard the expression pop over other than just to pop over to someone's house!
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:39AM
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bschr
We used to fill our popovers with fruit preserves.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:52AM
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farliec
Thank you to all who have cleared up the popover mystery! What a cute name! If you're really bad at making them, they don't really pop though :-S
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:53AM
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sarelimur
Last time I made popovers, one of them popped so high it fell out of the pan.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 9:00AM
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ASVInteriors
I only pop over for a cup of tea!!! However, roast beef and Yorkshire pud cannot be beaten for sunday lunch!
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 9:53AM
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Jessica
Farliec, my mom said they call them that because they "pop over" the sides of the baking pan....
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 9:54AM
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stryker
I am of Dutch descent. The name anyway, so there might be a couple of drops of Dutch blood in me. Two brothers, ancestors of mine, founded New York (then called New Amsterdam). I retain nothing of any culture along those lines. Like most Americans, I am a complete mutt.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 9:56AM
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ASVInteriors
Interesting jeanstryker cos my FOL's name is Dyckman and also a great great great descendent of the New York lot from near Calais.Your name struck me as similar, as there are a stream of Dyckstra, Dyckman and Van Dyck names - all from that time...
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 10:04AM
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Jessica
Jeanstryker, I am of Scottish descent - I know my genealogy back to the crusades. Some Irish got mixed in over time. The cultural differences between my family and my ex husband's family (primarily of a more German extraction) were striking, even though both of us are many generations away from coming to the USA. One of my ancestors was on the Mayflower. My ex only knew his genealogy through the Civil War because when Sherman went marching through Georgia he burned everything including the courthouses where the birth and death records were kept.
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 10:04AM
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Nancy Travisinteriors
They also spell words different, adding a "U" after O, a sofa is a Chesterfield. A living room is a lounge. Because of heating problems in older homes in UK, a lot of homes are rooms that can be closed off with doors. So you don't have that big open look, like homes in U.S. A crib is cot.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 11:29AM
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anneowl
Wainscoting instead of panelling. Read the term in a number of posts and couldn't figure out for ages what they meant!
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 12:29PM
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rinqreation
The 'y' in english last names with dutch roots comes from 'ij', over here those names still exist as 'van Dijk', 'Strijker', 'Dijkstra', 'de Rijk', etcetera. Most people have no clue how to pronounce a 'ij'.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:12PM
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rinqreation
Over here the popover is filled with cream and is called a 'soesje' and covered with chocolate icing a 'bossche bol'. Your teeth's glazing nearly comes off when eating one.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:16PM
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rinqreation
But this has nothing to do with utensils. :)
    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 1:24PM
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Victoria
@Travis, we don't add a u, the US took it out! A sofa is a sofa or a couch, a chesterfield is a particular type of sofa. We use living room, lounge or sitting room interchangeably.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:05PM
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Victoria
Also we use crib for a cradle type thing, also called a Moses basket, it's smaller than a cot.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:06PM
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ASVInteriors
More thoughtsFlashlight = torchDeck = porchDrapes = curtainsBaseboard = plinths ? (Or is that my English francophied?)what is a knocker on a door in US?Pull = knob or pullWc = loo or old times crapper after sir Thomas CrapperDoes the us have pull cords for lights or cisterns high above wc?Outlet = plug or plug hole?
6 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:21PM
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nasmijati
A Moses basket is for very tiny infants. Some people have a tiny bed for an infant called a bassinet.
First photo is a Moses basket.
Second photo is a modern style bassinet.
Third photo is a vintage bassinet.
Fourth photo is a bassinet with ruffles.

Sometimes a bassinet frame is built so the Moses basket can be set into it for the baby to sleep in.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:35PM
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nasmijati
@ASV. A knocker on a door in my part of the USA is called a "door knocker."

The wall has an electrical outlet. An electrical appliance such as a toaster has a cord with a plug that fits in the outlet.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:37PM
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nasmijati
@ASV. Some lights in the USA have pull chains (usually a "ball" style chain). I think these might be more common in Europe where many people's homes do not come with permanent lighting fixtures. Here, light fixtures are installed when a house is built and they stay with the house, and most have wall switches.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:50PM
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mescool
My favourite (or worst!) is pants for trousers.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 2:53PM
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chookchook2
Door knocker....... A ringer is called an Avon Lady, ding dong Avon calling! In Australia, a dead ringer is almost a carbon copy of a thing or person.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 3:47PM
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chookchook2
The bottom picture up above is a spouse.
    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 3:48PM
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stryker
Spouse? Please elaborate. I have never heard of spouse as anything besides the dear (or not so dear) other.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 5:35PM
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chookchook2
He he , ball and chain.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 6:47PM
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moirav
Things that always confuse me.... in the US they use"dirt" for soil, "yard" for garden, and "garden" is where they grow vegetables.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 7:11PM
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Cat Rowe
Hoover the carpet in the UK, as we vacuum ours in the U.S.
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:35PM
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Cat Rowe
I ring my friend at Great Dixter, but call my friend in the U.S.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:37PM
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stryker
Ah yes, chook!
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 8:51PM
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anneowl
Nasmijati, most if not all of Europe has fixed permanent lighting. In the UK most bathrooms are fairly small so it is required to have the light switched on by the pull cord method rather than a light switch. Can't remember the actual measurement but it is do with the distance between the bath/shower and the ability to switch on lights. A cord being safer with wet hands.

Enjoying this post, I read the Australian one too and it is amusing to find what is so different and what is almost the same and yet can be for something completely different!
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 11:25PM
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chookchook2
I'm getting completely confused.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 11:29PM
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auntiebuzzybee
Between which countries? About lighting? Or knockers ( a slang word for women's breast in the US, by the way) .
1 Like    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 11:40PM
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auntiebuzzybee
At the risk of repeating myself, 75% of dilemmas were abandoned or outdated by at least one year when I was on last night. Are there no new dilemmas, or what's going on? I even tried finding new ones pages down the way. When I have typed BUMP, nothing happens to it. Anybody else noticing any of this?
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 11:46PM
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chookchook2
This is new and significant

http://www.houzz.com/discussions/922967
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 4, 2014 at 11:58PM
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HomeScapes San Diego
I was Skyping with a relative who lives in London today (I'm in San Diego, CA) - she cut her finger and her boyfriend put a plaster on it (would be a BandAid here in the US)...and if you need to wash your pants while you're there, don't tell your host you'll get your pants to put in the washing machine, it's trousers in the UK, when I said pants they all started laughing... when we suspected some food had gone bad they said 'it's gone off' and when I asked for hot cereal it was always porridge...& when my friend was 'knackered' she went off to sleep....
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 12:32AM
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ASVInteriors
Also the British get in a queue not a line! - This is turning out to be quite a lexicon!
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 12:34AM
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bevcourt
bsellers1394 I posted a dilemma few days ago about desk v. wardrobe space. I need lots more feedback because Hubs and I are bickering constantly about it!
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 3:17AM
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cazzerole
An electrical outlet is a wall socket
A tub is called a bath here
We call a refrigerator a fridge
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 5:28AM
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cazzerole
Knackered means exhausted and it is said as cream crackered in cockney ryhming slang, it derives from when they took old animals to the knackers yard to be put down or put to sleep (euthanised in the US)
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 5:31AM
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cazzerole
rinqreation, that looks like what we would call a profiterole
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 5:34AM
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krootje
Well, this POLL isn't making it any easier on me.....
I do notice that there are different words for the same items and it's driving me nuts sometimes! Coming from Holland, where we learn "British-English" in school, and living in Canada I have to translate everything twice!!! From Dutch to British-English and now from British-English to American/Canadian-English! ;)
I have a long way to go.....
9 Likes    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 6:31AM
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K. Brown
Since we are on the subject of British things....my most favorite magazine for inspiration is "The World of Interiors" out of the UK. It is the only magazine I have kept every issue of since my first subscription 16 years ago.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 9:09AM
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nasmijati
@anneowl. Thank you for clarification and correction.
    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 12:03PM
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kathleen MK
ah, two countries divided by a common language as Shaw would say. And the US is more divided. Here In Texas we would be offering accident victims and contractors ICED tea (sweet no MILK) or Hot Coffee depending on the season. In Wales I remember hearing green fingers instead of a green thumb and a Mummy asking her son if he needed to go to the "little house" instead of the potty.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 12:04PM
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HomeScapes San Diego
In the US we think of 'high tea' as an afternoon tea with tea and little sandwiches & goodies, but in the UK it seemed that this might be "low tea" or 'afternoon' tea and 'high tea' was something else altogether...I am confused on this one
    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 1:03PM
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rinqreation
@cazzerole: yes, indeed! they do make several sizes over here too. only the 'bossche bol' is about 15cms (large man's fist)
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 1:43PM
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bschr
@cazzerole and rinqreation, in Canada we refer to them as cream puffs.
?
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 2:16PM
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bevcourt
I'm going to be a total pedant here, despite my British wish to ply anyone and everyone with tea, no matter what the circumstance, I have to say that as a First Aider you should probably never give any sort of drink to an accident victim in case they need treatment at hospital, Casualty, A and E or ER, whatever you own country calls it!
4 Likes    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 3:38PM
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jessegee
Pavement - sidewalk
My sister was run over in new york after a car came up on the pavement. During the court case, they assumed she was crossing the road, Pavement means road , not sidewalk.......
    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 4:39PM
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auntiebuzzybee
In New York, the car drove up on the sidewalk (because it happened in NY). Too bad her attorney didn't clarfy that before they went to court, for heaven's sake! How could they not have a police report with diagrams, a private investigator, video...any number of ways for the attorney to at least understand his client ( and visa versa) What a boob! (numbskull=idiot)
I do hope your sister was not terribly harmed.
    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 5:03PM
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aky3
There are numerous examples, but as this is houzz.com, I would say Parlour vs. Living Room. Or maybe I'm just old school using the word parlour.

@ Jessica - Calling EMS or 911 is NOT the best you can do. I would be getting my area councillor to get the mayor to a town hall meeting with your folk's neighbours. There is definitely something wrong with the design of that roadway.

I can't remember who mentioned Canadians used serviette, but I find paper napkin to be the most commonly used term in Canada. Canada closely resembles the US in terms of vocabulary, and the Brits in spelling, though Canadians still spell tyre 'tire'.
    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 5:08PM
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Jessica
Aky3 the road is State Road 212 which means that to have any changes made we have to go through the Maryland state legislature. My grandmother bought the house in 1953 when it was built and accidents in the front yard have been a fact of life ever since. The local neighborhood has collected petitions and gone to our legislators and gone to the state road transportation board on many occasions over the years like when one of our neighbors was killed standing at the bus stop, or when a van full of preschoolers was run off the road and shoved into a telephone pole by another vehicle. They will not change the road, nor will they install speed bumps or rumble strips. They will not install guard rails or barricades of any sort. The last time we went to them they just installed a few more signs and repainted the lines on the road. We have asked them to install a speed camera but they only do that in school zones so we don't qualify. There was an entire separate discussion I started asking for recommendations that we may not have already tried multiple times. We've gotten stories in the papers and on the news and nothing has changed. It doesn't mean we have stopped trying.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 6:15PM
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aky3
That really is quite unfortunate Jessica. I'm surprised the insurance companies for some of the casualties have not gone after the State.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 5, 2014 at 7:29PM
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Pauline Fearey
Some years ago my sister lived in america for a time. Her neighbours organised a meal so she could get to know people and everyone brought something to eat. My sister made an english sherry trifle and put it on the table of desserts, only to find it moved to the savouries table. Not sure if it was a Texas thing but apparently jelly dishes are served with the savoury part of the meal, not as a pudding.
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 10, 2014 at 3:32PM
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tessybear100
Talking of puddings, in our school play one mother who was American had to come up with a Christmas pudding costume for her child and she came dressed as a pavlova! No one really knew what to say! I'm not sure what our Christmas pudding is called in US or if they even have it!
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 10, 2014 at 10:30PM
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stryker
So does "pudding" always mean dessert? But there's the yorkshire kind, right? isn't that a savory dish?
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 4:41AM
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ASVInteriors
Pudding means dessert - except for Yorkshire pudding... and let's not get into pronunciations of towns and cities in the UK Warwick pronounced Warrick, Reading pronounced redding etc etc
6 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 4:54AM
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Jessica
Pauline, generally speaking gelatin dishes in the USA are treated as salads and served as part of the main meal at a potluck dinner. This is because Jello gelatin did huge marketing campaigns in the 1950s with recipe booklets which had people adding everything from celery, grapes, mayonnaise, etc. to the Jello gelatin to create multilayered spectacular looking dishes. At least in my church, you can't attend a potluck dinner without at least 3-5 women bringing some kind of Jello mould. Think more along the lines of an aspic type dish than a dessert.

Tessybear100 you can find specialty stores in the USA that sell Christmas puddings - usually the miniature kinds that are individually sized and imported from Europe. Generally speaking when you say "pudding" in the USA they will think of the vanilla, chocolate, or tapioca variety you'd buy in individual packs to put in children's lunches. In the deep south, banana pudding is quite popular and most frequently served with 'Nilla Wafers, a type of vanilla cookie (or biscuit for those in England).
3 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 6:10AM
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tessybear100
I think what we in UK call Christmas pudding you might call plum pudding, that is if you have it at all! It's what we have on Christmas Day with our lunch and it's usually covered in brandy and set alight!
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 6:18AM
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Jessica
It is called a plum pudding or Christmas pudding or boiled pudding depending where you are in the USA. Yes, covered with some kind of sauce or brandy and flambeed. My sister attempted to make one the last two years following recipes she found online or in a cookbook of things they serve the Queen. I think my mother is the only one we know who actually owns a Christmas pudding mould so my sister borrowed it. They were two of the worst kitchen disasters any of us have run into!
1 Like    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 6:27AM
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Jessica
Oh, and before I forget - boiled custard which would sometimes be used as a sauce for something like Christmas pudding is often drunk as an alternate to eggnog in some parts of the country and can be found at the grocers in the dairy aisle next to the milk, cream, and eggnog. Eggnog and boiled custard are seasonal items usually only available from Thanksgiving through New Years.
1 Like    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 6:37AM
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bschr
Plum or Christmas pudding was always a main stay growing up but now we seem to be replacing it with sticky toffee pudding mmmm.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 6:40AM
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stryker
Jessica, would you consider bread pudding the same as Christmas pudding? I have enjoyed bread puddings with hard sauce (with alcohol) in the past.

The Jello thing--I would not consider gelatin molds to be ubiquitous in pot lucks across the US.
2 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 7:07AM
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Jessica
Jeanstryker, that's why I said within my church - and I can only speak for church potlucks in the states where I've lived which include Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, California, Mississippi and Virginia.

Bread puddings are not the same as Christmas puddings. Honestly, the closest thing I can think of taste-wise that you'd come across most frequently in the US is a super heavy and dark fruitcake. Here's a recipe for a Christmas pudding: http://britishfood.about.com/od/christmas/r/xmaspud.htm
5 Likes    Bookmark   April 11, 2014 at 7:13AM
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cmaci
Great thread. I still have trouble with the word "cutlery" which in my British home was used for everything -knives, forks, spoons- with which you set the table. I think I finally figured out that the word 'flatware' is used in the US.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 5, 2014 at 6:10PM
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cmaci
Pauline, love your sherry trifle story. I have a thing going with an Aussie friend here in the US. If I invite him and his family to dinner, the first question is 'are we having trifle?' If I ever ask for a favor, then he asks for my trifle recipe (of course there's no such thing). My response is that I'm leaving him the recipe in my will!
1 Like    Bookmark   May 5, 2014 at 6:13PM
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chookchook2
Mmmmm dessert!
1 Like    Bookmark   May 6, 2014 at 2:49AM
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garyli1684
I've lived in Canada for yonks. Does anyone here recognise 'open concept' as a Canadian term?
It's 'open plan' in the UK and 'open floor plan' in the US.
1 Like    Bookmark   January 2, 2015 at 5:39AM
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aky3
I do. I guess Canadians are sophisticated like that :)
1 Like    Bookmark   January 2, 2015 at 8:47AM
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