Pet Proof Flooring
sarbez
April 12, 2014 in Design Dilemma
I need to replace flooring in a condo. I can do any kind of floating floor or carpet, and want to have a better-quality laminate installed. Will it be pet proof? Specifically, if my cat pukes on the floor, and I don't see it for a few hours, can the liquid get into the floor cracks and make the floor buckle or something? (Ideally I need to train the cat to not puke, but that's an issue for another forum! )
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PRO
Sophie Wheeler
Lookd at sheet vinyl or lock together luxury vinyl tile. Even it won't be ''pet proof''. No such flooring exists. You will need to keep your animal's nails clipped short and do so frequently.
1 Like   Thanked by sarbez    April 12, 2014 at 9:15AM
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Patricia Colwell
If all you are worried about is cat puke I don't think this is a big issue with laminate, if they are peeing that is whole different question. I have 2 huge dogs that don't always have their nails trimmed and they come in and out from a dog run all day onto my vinyl plank flooring in my basement , never have had a problem with mud or wet feet or nails. I love how it looks and in a condo it is quieter than laminate. There are some really nice ones on the market.
0 Likes   Thanked by sarbez    April 12, 2014 at 10:35AM
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sarbez
Thanks for both your comments. I know nothing is 100% pet proof, but I'm looking for the best options. I hadn't thought about the vinyl options for the living, dining, bedrooms. I was looking at that for the bath and kitchen. But maybe that's the answer for the entire place and have a seamless look throughout. I do wonder if that much vinyl will look fake or cheap.
0 Likes   April 12, 2014 at 2:30PM
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ce007roy
I've been looking at the Smartstrand carpeting for the family/living area areas. Supposedly it is super good option for pet related stains and wine, etc.
0 Likes   Thanked by sarbez    April 14, 2014 at 4:19PM
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Gofloors
Vinyl is by far the best value for "virtually" pet-proof flooring. Laminate and wood will both stain and absorb moisture, which leads to them expanding and buckling. Good quality vinyl plank is 100% waterproof, and has a urethane finish and vinyl wear-layer that will protect from staining.

Now it is true that as far as smell goes, that is beyond the flooring, and especially if it reaches your sub-floor, it could in theory start to mold (especially if you have a wood sub-floor). But if you do a glue-down installation, moisture should not be able to penetrate your vinyl layer.

If you are looking for vinyl plank, there are some great options these days that have wood texture.
0 Likes   Thanked by sarbez    April 14, 2014 at 4:28PM
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sarbez
I appreciate the carpet suggestion, but I really don't want to do carpet again for other reasons too, like dust and maintenance.

Re the vinyl plank. I keep hearing that term -- I assume vinyl planks are like a floating floor that locks together, and the top is vinyl rather than fake wood or wood veneer? I've seen stone-look vinyl tiles that lock together that are quite attractive and pretty real-looking.

Re cat-proofing -- it's unlikely the cats will pee on the floor, but you never know, especially as they age. And as for cat vomit, it does happen and I would hate to install a floor to have it quickly ruined due to a bit of kitty-barf. The glue-down option makes good sense, so thank you!
0 Likes   April 14, 2014 at 5:18PM
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Gofloors
Vinyl plank just refers to the plank design (7" x 48", for example). Tile refers to more of a square tile design (12" x 12", for example). Generally plank comes in wood designs, and tile comes in stone designs. They are all the same vinyl composition construction, however, with a print film that is protected by clear vinyl. The thickness of the vinyl covering the print-film (the wear-layer) determines how durable it is. I would recommend a 0.3 mm or thicker wear-layer for the best performance with pets.

The product can come either click or glue-down. I would recommend glue-down if you want the best performance, but the click is easier to install.
1 Like   Thanked by sarbez    April 14, 2014 at 5:33PM
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