Ripped out all my old bushes - now what? Please help with landscaping
mackiebischoff
April 29, 2014 in Before & After
Landscaping help!
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Margo
How about some hydragea bushes?
April 29, 2014 at 7:34am   
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mackiebischoff
Love them - how do they do in sun?
April 29, 2014 at 7:46am   
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garden design online
Plant forsythia,azalea,privet,hydrangea,fern,hosta...replace the walkway.
April 29, 2014 at 8:00am   
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ASVInteriors
If you do add Hydrangeas, bear in mind they lose their leaves in winter and look a little twiggy. Try to interplant with some evergreens or boxwood

April 29, 2014 at 8:09am     
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decoenthusiaste
Hydrangeas usually do very well on the north side and in partial shade, although there are some varieties that like sun. For early bloom, azaleas inter-planted with hydrangeas for later bloom. If it is shady there is an evergreen clematis armandii with leathery leaves much like southern magnolia. It grows profusely and has small sweet smelling flowers just at the end of winter. You might train one onto that brick wall below the porchwith some trellising.
April 29, 2014 at 8:15am     
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Jessica
Be sure to measure where you want to plant them (how deep, tall, etc.) so that when you are picking plants you can choose varieties that won't get too big for the area you're planting them in. Be sure when you plant them to plant them far enough apart to allow for their size when mature - this may look sparse when you initially plant them but in a couple of years you'll be glad you didn't plant them too close because they will be so much healthier!

Pick evergreens (azalea, rhododendron, boxwood) if you want something with leaves year round. Pick hydrangeas, peonies, forsythia, witch hazel, and many others if you don't mind them dropping their leaves and looking twiggy in the winter. For winter interest pick something with interesting shape or colored bark like the red twigged dogwood I've attached a photo of, or the twisted shapes of Harry Lauder's Walking stick in the second photo. (Photos found on the internet)
April 29, 2014 at 8:33am     
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tsudhonimh
I don't see any clear path to the front steps.

Make it obvious, with a seat-height wall, some shrubs or something that the way to the steps is not across the grass.
April 29, 2014 at 9:38am   
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Jessica
Also, that beautiful red Japanese maple to the left of the porch appears in the photographs to be too close to the house. Check this, because it can cause problems later and right now it appears to still be small enough you could move it if necessary. I can't tell from a photo if it is actually as close as it appears.
April 29, 2014 at 9:42am   
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bungalowmo
Great post with tons of great ideas! In fact everyone here has helped me with some of the same issues I'm having when it comes to what to plant where.

I cleared out all my boxwood bushes shortly after moving here. There was no rhyme or reason to their placement & they smelled horrible on steamy hot summer days!

And last, but not least, now I can stop calling my Hydrangea my "white snowball bush"!! haha
Had no clue what it was :0)
April 30, 2014 at 3:31pm     
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bungalowmo
Oh....here's my snowball bush shortly after moving in. Bigger & more blossoms after 7 years!

You can also see my stinky boxwoods I removed. In fact I gave them away!
April 30, 2014 at 3:35pm   
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acroteria
[Edit: Mackleblschoff, Per the pic @ the intro. to this thread;] You neglected to remove that foundation-hating Bloodgood in the left corner. Lowe's sells them for $50.

[Sorry for the confusion, bungalowmo]
April 30, 2014 at 3:44pm     
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bungalowmo
acroteria...who? Me? If you mean that tree...it's GONE! :0)
April 30, 2014 at 6:29pm   
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bellburgmaggie
Your beds are way too close to the house. Bring the beds out another 10 feet and add some curvature. Also the front steps dump out onto a lawn? There should be a sidewalk to the curb and perhaps one to the driveway. From the street, your eye should go to the front door, otherwise you get lost in the landscape. Not knowing what climate zone, its hard to specify plants.
April 30, 2014 at 10:42pm   
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mackiebischoff
We are in Ky for climate recommendations :).
May 1, 2014 at 4:15am   
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Jessica
By the way, blue and pink hydrangeas are the same plant - the color of the flowers is dependent upon the make-up of the soil and how acidic it is. Some people who love the deep blue color will drive iron nails into the soil around the plant to help it reach this color. I don't recommend that method, but you can use different types of fertilizer to get whichever color you prefer. http://www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/colorchange.html
May 1, 2014 at 5:07am   
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