Would you rather - Earthquakes or Hurricanes?

Emily HurleyMay 7, 2014
If you had to choose between living either in an area where there is a more unpredictable risk of earthquakes or in an area where you are prone to hurricanes?

VOTE and tell us why!
Earthquakes, please.
Hurricanes, thanks.
Other - Tell us below!
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rosecottagehome
We have a choice right? So neither if I had to pick. I prefer less risky areas, to live out my days. That said, I do reside in Florida, but only when hurricane season is over.
2 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 3:54PM
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c069766
I'd rather live in Hurricane country because there is plenty of time to get out of harms way. Even though earthquakes usually do no harm, there is no warning in the big ones that hit. I'm from SoCalifornia but now live in North Texas. Tornadoes are the worst disasters.
14 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 5:15PM
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Emily Hurley
I have to admit, Tornados scare me a LOT! And I have grown up entirely in earthquake country.
5 Likes    Bookmark   May 7, 2014 at 5:20PM
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cabingirl13
Neither....that's why I live in the Midwest. I would much rather deal with snow/cold all winter and the occasional tornado threat in the summer.
4 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 5:21PM
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Denita
I would rather have the warnings offered by Hurricane forecasters than an unexpected Earthquake or Tornadoes
21 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 5:22PM
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Margaret Wakefield
You can always get you and your things out of the way of a hurricane
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 8:06PM
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Studio M Interior Design
Hurricanes, definitely. Pile up the sand bags and throw a "Hurricane Party" as we Floridians like to call it :)
10 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 8:39PM
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Cocoweb
Awesome greeen color!
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 7, 2014 at 8:55PM
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wickedxx
I live in an area prone to quakes. Given the choice I will stay here in Vancouver.

The other option seems like you are in a state of fear or panic every time a tropical storm is approaching. Having to be ready to pack up and evacuate. I couldn't live like that.
7 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 12:43AM
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ASVInteriors
I'm surprised no one chose neither!Oops sorry cabin girl very wise choice but I even avoid tornados!We have to worry from the odd avalanche.However we all have to fear climate change, as that will definitely affect hurricanes, typhoon, tornado and flood zones
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 1:28AM
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nikkiseashores
Typically Hurricanes cause more damage to homes.
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 1:50AM
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dietreue
Living in a place where there's both, neither! However, in an earthquake you're a sitting duck (before, during, and after). There's nothing like the hopeless feeling of the earth moving beneath your feet and all around you, in your house, outside, anywhere! There's no where to run and no sheltering from an earthquake, it's untimely. And then, if you happen to be on a coastal area, there's the possible aftermath of even MORE earth-beneath-your-feet-moving coupled with the possibility of a tsunami. At least with a hurricane, there's enough warnings naturally (I mean without news and stuff) to prepare accordingly and ensure as much safety as you can. The vulnerability is at two different ends of the scale with these two, that's for sure.
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 11:05AM
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sharaibaby
Hurricanes. Because you can see them coming and evacuate.
5 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 11:13AM
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mabelbridges
Neither.
2 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 11:39AM
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victorianbungalowranch
I only have to worry about blizzards up here, and the best thing to do for that is stay put! Loved blizzards as a kid--no school, homemade pizza and hot chocolate and toasted marshmallows in the fireplace. Today, not as much, but it is warm and cozy and we have a snowblower to help. Just got to go out and make sure the furnace vents aren't blocked once in awhile.
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 11:48AM
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Nancy S
Except for one year in Texas as a child I've always lived in Southern California. I've experienced a few big earthquakes and had a lot of damage to my house after the Northridge quake. But still, they happen so rarely and I couldn't imagine living where there is a hurricane or tornado season.

I was once working a trade show in Las Vegas when there was a big explosion at a rocket fuel factory in Henderson. You could tell who was from California as we'd all been trained to duck and cover. We're past due for another big quake but I still wouldn't live anywhere else.
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 12:47PM
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Jessica
Lived in areas that have both. Will take a hurricane like Katrina which I survived over an earthquake like the Northridge or the New Madrid one. I've been to lake reelfoot created when the New Madrid earthquake caused the mighty Mississippi river to flow backwards and it made an impression. Besides, hurricanes give us a little warning before they arrive.
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 1:21PM
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whaleeyex2
Neither. Face it, global changes are raging and thinking either an option for the next 50-100 years seems crazy.
2 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 1:28PM
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midmodfan
I'd say neither, of course. We have a second house in Florida, though, but deliberately chose a place within the Georgia Bight which is not prone to hurricanes.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 2:51PM
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quercus2
You can easily outrun a hurricane because there is a lot of advance warning. Not so with earthquakes. I vote for hurricanes as lesser of two evils.
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 4:00PM
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smileyface2013
I chose hurricane because it would mean that I am living near the ocean, and I think that would be wonderful.
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 5:31PM
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imketimm
If one or the other would be the only option I would pick a hurricane over an earthquake any day, as one can outfit a house with some safety measures, as well as there being enough warning to get out of the way in time. Neither applies to an earthquake...
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 8, 2014 at 6:12PM
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Emily Hurley
That's my thinking too, @imketimm
    Bookmark   May 8, 2014 at 6:15PM
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PRO
Lampert Dias Architects, Inc.
With proper design, a house can withstand an earthquake or a hurricane. I am ok with either one as long as I have the right house.

The design for a tornado proof house is much more complex because the forces from a tornado are so much more powerful. To resist a tornado, you need a concrete house that is partially underground........Hurricanes and earthquakes are never as powerful as a tornado.

I would choose either hurricanes or earthquakes........I spend part of my time in Southern California in earthquake country and I am part time in Hong Kong which has several Typhoons blowing through every year ( and Typhoons are the same as Hurricanes )
4 Likes    Bookmark   May 8, 2014 at 7:23PM
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debjonesfabbri
ummm...Prone to quakes???? Vancouver has never had a large earthquake, ever.
    Bookmark   May 8, 2014 at 7:41PM
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kathleen MK
Well I spent a good part of the afternoon in the Boys' restroom when our rainy day dismissal turned into a lock down for a tornado warning. The moms were more frighten than the kids including me with my son whose bus left just before the sirens went off. Hurricanes can get more advanced warnings but stubborn Gulf Coast families will ignore them almost as much as my West Texas family will ignore the sirens. Actually for my husband a tornado siren signals go outside and look at the sky. Guess it all depends on where you were raised.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 8, 2014 at 8:02PM
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mirandarout
I live in Christchurch, New Zealand and have lived through a 7.1 and a deadly 6.2 earthquake. I think I'd rather opt for something with some warning. We have lost most of our central city and a good deal of what I think we all lived through was the sudden shock of it all. I was in our offices in the heart of the city where there was so much devestation, collapsed buildings and collapsing buildings all of which occured within seconds. Over 3 years later and the insurance company's construction company is finally beginning the extensive repairs to our 1927 arts and crafts house. Excited and can't wait to move home - we have not been able to live there since the Feb 2011 quake.
7 Likes    Bookmark   May 8, 2014 at 8:26PM
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kmkane
There are a LOT more damaging hurricanes these days than earthquakes. I'll play the odds and take earthquakes!
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 8, 2014 at 9:55PM
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elbit
I've chosen to live in Israel. Too many threats to articulate here. The most obvious is 170,000 rockets pointed at us. The less obvious is threat of diminished democratic institutions and the inherent diversity that comes with it. I would take the odd hurricane. We can use the water!
3 Likes    Bookmark   May 9, 2014 at 1:28AM
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pariscafe
@mirandarout. Christchurch is a special place for me and my heart went out to you all. We lost our home in the Queensland 2011 floods so I get it with insurance companies. We have been to Christchurch and the beautiful South Island many times and if we could find work would seriously consider moving across the ditch. It makes me sad to see the cracks in buildings plus many walls and fences still propped up on the drive in from the airport. So glad to see the CBD springing back to life. What a world eh? Floods, earthquakes, tornadoes, cyclones, tsunamis or drought no one is immune.
4 Likes    Bookmark   May 9, 2014 at 3:05AM
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mirandarout
Thanks for this pariscafe and agree what a world! Likewise our hearts have gone out to our neighbours from across the ditch with the ever increasing natural disasters you have been dealing with. Ultimately however you lose your home, city or loved ones, the grief and the challenges remain the same. I suppose the frightening thing with mother nature is there is no hope or pathway for diplomacy, negotiations or moving away from her. Regrettably our world is reacting with the affects of climate change which humankind is ultimately responsible for. Back to the question though, because parts of our city have literally sunk following Feb earthquake, there are homes that are literally flooded every time it rains - such that they are wading around in water inside their living rooms. - their streets 1 metre deep in water. The problems with earthquakes, as we have learnt, is that they completely alter the terrain such that you become vulnerable to nature's other elements in a way you would not usually be.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 9, 2014 at 3:22PM
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Genevieve
Neither
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 10, 2014 at 4:49PM
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lara_jane
Having grown up in Northern California and remembering quite vividly the 6.9 Loma Prieta quake, and now living in SW Missouri and seeing friends' and neighbors' lives and homes ripped apart in tornadoes in 2008 & 2011 (not to mention "smaller" events in neighbouring towns over the years)? Yeah, I'm going to have to say earthquakes any day.

As pariscafe said, natural disasters are everywhere. If you've lived through any event you're going to be biased from the terror and from living with the aftermath. I'd prefer not to experience anymore firsthand, but I don't think there is a place in the world exempt from it.
5 Likes    Bookmark   May 10, 2014 at 11:01PM
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kiya05
I grew up in Southern California, and lived there for 15 years as an adult, and never experienced anything but "shakers". Some would bounce the table across the room, and my mom would just casually say, "Grab the potatoes before they fall off the table". The shakers I've experienced never lasted long either, and while I've never experienced a hurricane, I'll stick with the earthquakes, of course I would certainly change my mind if the earth split open, or buildings started falling down.
3 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 1:52AM
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cgrma
I grew up in tornado country along with snow storms. Lived for 12 years on the TX Gulf coast and went through hurricane Ike that is the forgotten hurricane. Recently moved the the mountains of TN where I understand there are minor earthquakes and an occasional tornado. I think I will take that.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 2:47AM
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aldus70ag
Hurricanes have bigger devastating effect because strong hurricane travels thousands of miles and leaves path of destruction behind him. Flooding often follows the hurricane, but earthquake can also trigger a tsunami .
Earthquakes cover comparably small area , and today many buildings are built using earthquake reinforced construction . But at least for now science can not predict where the next earthquake will accure. Both are dangerous but they have been a part of human existence from time immemorial . And statistically , there is a much bigger chance to die in a car accident that from any of aforementioned natural disaster.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 2:54AM
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Kathleen Marineau
From an anxiety point of view, I'd opt for earthquakes. The schedule disruption, evacuations, leaving animals behind multiple times every single year is too much. With earthquakes you don't know about them ahead of time and once they're over, you're too busy with cleanup to spend days worrying about if you'll be hit. My first big one was 1952 White Wolf quake, a 7.3, then the Sylmar 6.6 in 1971. I've also lived in hurricane, tornado and seasonal flooding communities.
4 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 2:55AM
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Margaret Wakefield
cgrma, I live along the coast in the South Carolina lowcountry over half my life. I moved to the mountains of Western North Carolina to escape all of that too
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 3:01AM
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Sauve
I've lived in both and been through some pretty bad ones in both. At least with a Hurricane you can escape in land where as with an earthquake there is no where to go and there is no warning. It is pretty scary to be in a car and on or under a bridge when an earthquake hits. I've also lived in areas that have tornadoes. Houses just two streets over were gone. That was frightening. We lived in the alps region when there was an avalanche that had been anticipated but only generally. Generally as in, There have obviously been avalanches here in the past few thousand years and this mountain side is positioned so that another could come within the next few hundred years. We were staying about 6 kilometers away and it sounded like nothing I have ever heard before or since. I don't think you can escape to live in a place where there is no natural danger point on this living planet. But if I must choose then I choose to be not too far out in the country, not in a suburb, with my husband and our pets, and not on the coast. I much prefer not living on the coast or near to a beach.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 3:03AM
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Kathleen Marineau
Debjonesfabbri - check out this report: http://www.seattle.gov/emergency/hazards/earthquake.htm. The entire Pacific Ocean is rimmed by the "Ring of Fire" The further you are from the coast, the lower your risk of damage from an earthquake.
    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 3:04AM
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sunnie2day
Like many commenters I grew up in Southern California so I've been through several quakes - the worst being the '71 Sylmar quake. I will never forget the sight, live on camera (I was up getting ready for school and watching early morning TV from L.A.) the front of the VA hospital collapsing and occupied beds shooting off the now-walless floors.

I moved away after uni, lived all over the US including central FL during Hurricane Andrew, and the US Gulf of Mexico during the multiple hitting 2004 'cane season (Hurricane Ivan spawned tornadoes took just about everything I owned at the time) - left after Katrina and moved for my last five US years to NW GA where annual ice-snow storms took out the power grid regularly, and tornadoes were common too.

In the US, natural disaster is something that happens just about anywhere. I chose 'Cane/'Nado Country over Earthquake Country because with 'canes and tornadoes, one does usually get enough advance warning to get outta Dodge - stuff can be replaced, people and beloved companion animals cannot. From '77 through 2010 I lived in the American South and never once missed living where earthquakes could take out an entire neighbourhood (fires, fissures, collapsing buildings and freeways...) in a half-heartbeat without so much as a seconds worth of warning.

I live in my parent's native UK now, land of seemingly incessant rains, lol, but what folks in the UK call a wicked storm doesn't really register with me:)
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 4:27AM
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thickskin
I live in Hurricane country (the caribbean). We get a weeks warning. We already are getting the daily messages on the radio saying PREPARE, PREPARE, PREPARE, Its a mantra in our house.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 5:42AM
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phyllisriggs
Hurricane North Carolina with sufficient warning usually, but weather has become more unpredictable the past few years and seasons. We seen to now have 2 seasons, either winter or summer. Don't understand other than Bible predicted this.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 6:16AM
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sclawson
I live in tornado alley. Much less of a risk when there is a tornado that it will hit MY home.
    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 6:31AM
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ddelora
Have lived in SoCal for 56 years and never suffered damage from earthquakes...a bit of a shake and done, over with. Would like to retire to Kentucky to enjoy country living, space, quiet...but research is on for a property out of tornado territory and sink hole mayhem. Apparently, peace and quiet comes at a price!
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 6:37AM
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David Whitton
I have lived in Southern California since 1963, except 10 years in Oklahoma City with my company. Tornados scared us to death in Oklahoma. TV stations stopped all programming and gave tornado reports that went on for hours and hours, making sure you're really scared. Earthquakes, on the other hand, last 30 seconds, or so, you have no warning and no time to be scared. I'll take the earthquakes every time.
3 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 6:45AM
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michaelfred67
I would sooner live in a more stable region like Ontario Canada.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 7:47AM
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sherrycar
I grew up in the Midwest, but now live near Houston, in Galveston county, about 30 miles from the coast. In recent years, I have evacuated for hurricanes Rita and Ike. Rita went east of us, so the only damage and death came from the evacuation of Houston. Ike went directly over but it's damage was mostly from water, and that didn't reach us. Houses here (in coastal counties) are built to hold up to anything up through a category 3 hurricane at least. We haven't had above a 2 hit near us since I moved here in 1987. Tornadoes may come with the hurricanes, but they are generally small ones that do little damage.

Neither the tornadoes of the Midwest nor the hurricanes near Houston have worried me much. Earthquakes would scare me, because of the lack of warning, but I suppose that is because I am not used to the threat. Personally, I think there are risks anywhere (hurricane, earthquake, wild fire, tornado, landslide, avalanche, etc.) and I won't let that decide where I live. Forced to choose, I would take the hurricanes because you can evacuate and take anything important. Oh, and I wouldn't live in tornado alley without a basement or safe room in the house.
3 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 8:08AM
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kerryblu4me
Between earthquakes and hurricanes, I'd take hurricanes, since you have advanced warning with hurricanes. No way would I ever want to live in an area prone to tornadoes - I'd take earthquakes over tornadoes. But bring on the blizzards! We can definitely deal with those!
3 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 8:13AM
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PRO
J Design Group - Interior Designers Miami - Modern
My answer is NEITHER However if I really had to choose I would say a hurricane . As we live in Miami we have experienced hurricanes - one of the most destructive being ANDREW. It was disastrous however you are able have cover and shelter. In the case of an earthquake - the thought of the possibility of the ground opening up and swallowing you is not at all pleasant.

J Design Group, Modern Interior Design Firm in Miami, Florida. http://www.JDesignGroup.com
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 8:26AM
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sharej
I vote neither, but if I had to pick one it would be quakes. I lived in CA for 30 yrs & GA for 15 yrs & now NE Texas. And you can absolutely tell when a quake is coming.... Just watch your pets, the birds & wildlife in and around your area. They know days ahead. Pay attention to your instincts.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 8:47AM
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Suzie Quiring, Realtor (805) 501-2556 Direct
Not sure if anyone mentioned this so my apologies ahead of time but I'm a native CA and even with the Northridge earthquate, being the worst experienced throughout CA, they last 30 seconds, maybe a bit more, do their damage, and they're done. I'd take a quick over and done disaster way before worrying for a week, vacating, and returned after so much tie has passed to see if there was or wasn't damage. Happy in Cali ...
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 9:15AM
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cwoodstock
Living on the east coast all my life I will take hurricanes as long is you are not in a "flood prone" area. We recently moved to Colorado with a higher tendency of tornado activity and wild fires. Just need to be on your toes and know what to do with FAR LESS notice.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 9:28AM
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lahansley
I grew up in the Caribbean where there are earthquakes, hurricanes and lizards however I prefer hurricanes because there is advanced warning. When I came to the Washington DC area I thought I was home free but we have had two earthquakes, several hurricanes but no lizards.
4 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 9:48AM
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cgrma
sherrycar We lived in Galveston for 12 years, Katrina, Rita and Ike. The horror of Rita was the evacuation. More people died on the hiway from being stuck for 48 hours then they did from the hurricane. And with Ike we were out of our house for almost 2 weeks, weren't allowed on the island then had to wait for water, sewer lights and gas to be restored. There are still people 5 1/2 yrs later that are not back or still repairing.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 10:35AM
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venusalderman
I am a native Floridian and have lived through numerous hurricanes. I also lived through the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989. I was still in my office working when the quake struck. I rode it out under my desk. What a horror to find out that the Cypress Street viaduct had collapsed onto the Nimitz Freeway during commute traffic. I had friends and coworkers using that freeway to travel home from work. In the aftermath, volunteers and National Guard went to the freeway structure looking into individual vehicles for survivors and the dead. Two of my coworkers were involved in that search and it was a horrific job. There were other horrors that day, but this one affected me the most. All that being said, I'll take hurricanes over earthquakes any day.
2 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 10:50AM
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jboncaro
I'm with you, venusalderman. The Loma Prieta destroyed my house, not all at once, but weakened it so it was too unstable to be safe. Still, I turned away the inspectors and told them I was lucky and my house was fine. It withstood all the roughly 4500 aftershocks we experienced and gave me time to find a new home. Ultimately it was destroyed. But I still prefer the quick earthquake over the anxiety-producing, life-disrupting hurricane. Bottom line: if an earthquake hits, you're either dead or alive. If you're still alive, everything can be repaired or replaced.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 12:44PM
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bungalowmo
I'll take a hurricane any day of the week. This place has already survived several, so it's all good!! :0)

I call her my "3 little pigs house"!
3 Likes    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 12:52PM
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feeny
I lived for 17 years in the SF Bay Area with no earthquake damage (and barely even felt the numerous small earthquakes we had), so I'd choose earthquakes. With hurricanes, the endless cycle of warnings, evacuations, floodings, houses destroyed and rebuilt would drive me crazy. Honestly, the drought conditions in CA in the 1970's inconvenienced me infinitely more than the earthquakes did. Now I live in the northern midwest with no threat of either (and no history of tornados either). But if we get too many more "polar vortexes" I'll be tempted to move back to earthquake country just to stay warm.
    Bookmark   May 11, 2014 at 1:06PM
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summgardner
A friend and I were just discussing if there was a "safe" state to live in the U.S. Although all are susceptible to any disaster, I thought maybe Arizona may be a safer bet. Coming from the Northeast, we get Nor'easters from fall to Spring which are devastating if you live on the coast. We have also had hurricanes and a few tornadoes, although nothing like the ones in the west.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 11, 2014 at 7:30PM
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t1motheus
Earthquake. Over in 30 seconds. Less mud and wide spread water damage.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 11, 2014 at 10:00PM
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earthmonkey
I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area. We have had one large enough earthquake to be noted in my life, you get hurricanes every year.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 11, 2014 at 10:04PM
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Curt D'Onofrio
I have never had beach front property, but if i did then i'll take my chances with the earthquake(s). But in all my life thus far i've always lived inland...hurricanes are no problem. That is, no structures i lived in were shakened to death....knock on wood
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 11, 2014 at 11:45PM
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suekat12
You can't fight Mother Nature. She's always going to win. What amazes me is that we continue to build homes in areas of the country that are prone to these natural disasters. In California when you buy a home, you have to sign a waiver that you're aware of the earthquake faults that surround your home. Yet, we still buy those homes. We play the odds when we choose beautiful scenery or nice weather over our safety. I guess when we build our homes in the path of Mother Nature, we have to accept the consequences.
4 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 10:45AM
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Studio NOO Design
Neither ! Here we get floods every spring on our country house yard, and it is not welcome, so big storms are not wanted.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 10:45AM
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Kathleen Marineau
At least half of California has neither earthquakes or hurricanes. The biggest fault lines are along the coast under the biggest cities. The rest of us live (lived, in my case) in agriculture or desert areas. Drought is our yearly worry.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 11:01AM
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Marilyn Silva Dober
I live in "Earthquake Country". Wouldn't be anywhere else. Well, Maui, perhaps.
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 11:25AM
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sherrycar
CGRMA I do understand that Rita was bad, just not to the homes in Houston. I evacuated from it with a 3 month old and 2 dogs, going East to family in Baton Rouge. I was closer to the water then, and expected to return to an empty slab. We left later than most, and each city we reached seemed to announce evacuation just as we reached it, so we were just ahead of the worst traffic, and the usual 5 hour drive took 14 hours. We considered ourselves very, very lucky. I was glad we drove home at night so I didn't have to see so much destruction. Soon after, we moved to an area safe from storm surge, though we could still lose everything in a bad hurricane.

I also understand how bad Ike was, as much as someone who really didn't experience it herself can. I only meant that it hadn't affected us much. When we returned home 2 days later, our back fence was down and our electricity was back on about 3 hours later. That's about as minor damage as you can have when the eye of a hurricane goes directly over your house. I saw lots of damage though. It was an underrated storm if you lived where the storm surge or flooding reached. Many older homes were damaged by the winds also, because they were built before the current building requirements. And an incredible number of people spent weeks without electricity. The damage is still clearly visible when we drive to Galveston.
2 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 11:44AM
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shazzan
Life is hard enough as it is for most people,so adding an earthquake or a hurricane would be unthinkable!!
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 1:57PM
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MrsSpooky Brown
Floridian here. It's already been said that it's nice to know when they're coming so you can prepare. I've spent time all up and down California and Tokyo and never felt a quake so I can't compare. Did I mention I like having the warning?
2 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 12, 2014 at 8:15PM
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qofmiwok
I've lived with both, but in my area hurricanes are rare and I am at 600 feet elevation so at least the sea wouldn't get me. I could never live somewhere like coastal Florida which gets a lot of them. There it seems like just a matter of time. Plus I get extremely sick from mold, so that kind of moisture would be difficult on me.

Earthquakes are different; at least in the US, most houses ride through them fine. It's just old, poorly built, unstrapped ones which usually have the problems. Earthquakes come and go fast, no need to worry ahead of time. (I personally am opposite of the person above as I find it better to not have a warning.) Believe it or not, they're actually an element of fun: riding it out, talking to people about it, comparing stories. (No disrespect to the people who are tragically killed or injured in them.)
    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 13, 2014 at 4:03PM
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chloebud
I've lived in SoCal for most of my life and experienced lots of quakes without, so far, much damage. There wasn't a single noticeable quake the first 10 years we lived here. Sure seems tornadoes and hurricanes can do worse damage...and be more frequent. However, it's pretty frightning how earthquakes come out of nowhere with no warning. I don't deal well! Then you have to wait for the aftershocks.
1 Like    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 13, 2014 at 4:22PM
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lc29
I've lived in tornado country, hurricane country, and now live in earthquake country. I love the weather here in SoCal, but felt safer in Florida with the advance notice you get with hurricanes.
2 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 13, 2014 at 8:19PM
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Lori King
I survived the largest quake ever recorded in N. America & the 2nd largest in the world. It lasted for 5 minutes.
No warning that the ground is going to open under you, or a loved one. I am very accustomed to quakes. Alaska has more earthquakes than the rest of the U.S., combined. We have one 7-8 quake every year; forty five 5-6 quakes a year; an avg. of 1,000 earthquakes a month. Of course, the tiny ones you don't even feel.
Hurricanes I've survived, as well, around the world. Warning is a wonderful thing!
And yes, we have winds over 100 mph every year in AK, but we don't refer to them as hurricanes.
Beginning with the warning & prep for a hurricane, there is NO comparison between a hurricane & earthquake.

So I'd take a hurricane every day of the year, over an earthquake.
I love traveling & spending time in hurricane-prone areas of earth... but I won't trade the beauty of Alaska, to live in one of them. So it's a good thing Im used to earthquakes.
Just pray I will never experience another 9.2 that lasts for 5 minutes, ripping the world apart, that can swallow one child into the earth, while a child 2' away, is just fine.
Oh - yes, our structural design in Alaska is made for earthquakes, so you're perfectly safe, if you visit!
3 Likes    Bookmark   Thanked by Emily Hurley    May 14, 2014 at 9:07AM
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1945shadow
I have lived through both, California's earthquakes and fires or "Shake & Bake" country and the east coast. Give me hurricanes any day! One can always evacuate as we certainly have plenty of warnings with hurricanes. Tornados, fires, earthquakes, are too terrorizing and destructive. One can rebuild with a hurricane, but loss of life is permanent.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 30, 2014 at 9:04AM
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1945shadow
The US has the most extreme weather in the world, from the record scorching heat of Death Valley, to the bone chilling winds of Mt Washington, NH. Include Tornado Alley, Hurricane Season, the Blizzards across the northern section of the US, the earthquakes in Alaska and California, and the wildfires and flooding and you have a recipe for potential disaster. What warms my heart is the generosity, resilience, and spirit of Americans after any disaster. After Sandy, friends and neighbors in NJ fed and bed those less fortunate, churches and synagogues helped to rebuild, State Police came from the south to help as NJ State Troopers had helped during Katrina. People donated time and money and extended their hearts to those less fortunate.
1 Like    Bookmark   May 30, 2014 at 5:45PM
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charleee
Earthquake! Did anyone feel this morning's quake?
    Bookmark   August 24, 2014 at 4:36PM
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chloebud
We're about 400+ miles south of Napa. I woke up at 3:35 am to the bed shaking enough to wake me up. However, it was at exactly 3:35 am, and they said the quake was at 3:20. Who knows...it wouldn't be the first time a quake was felt that far away. Ohhh how I HATE earthquakes!
1 Like    Bookmark   August 24, 2014 at 5:07PM
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charleee
We're in San Joaquin county, I was sitting on the sofa getting ready for my first cup of coffee and the sofa just started moving side to side to side...We're not on a fault line! That can't be an earthquake! But I'd rather NOT buy a mobile home and move to Kansas.
    Bookmark   August 24, 2014 at 5:30PM
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quercus2
@debjonesfabbri .... The government of Canada says Vancouver is at high risk of having an earthquake. And that "Some of the world's largest earthquakes have occurred in British Columbia." ... http://vancouver.ca/home-property-development/earthquake.aspx
    Bookmark   August 24, 2014 at 5:35PM
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PRO
Atlas Custom Cabinets Ltd
@quercus2: good to know! How do you make your house earthquake safe?
    Bookmark   December 16, 2014 at 11:11AM
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