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Asparagus
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spreading out the roots, about 12 to 18 inches apart along the mound. Cover the crowns with about 2 to 3 inches of loose soil. As the shoots appear, keep adding loose soil until the mound sits just above the surrounding soil level. Keep the bed well watered and be diligent about keeping it weed free; adding
slightly shallower if your soil is heavy. Place the soil you removed to the side. If you're growing the plants in rows, create the next trench 3 to 6 feet away” “mound. Cover the crowns with about 2 to 3 inches of loose soil. As the shoots appear, keep adding loose soil until the mound sits just above
above the surrounding soil level. Keep the bed well watered and be diligent about keeping it weed free; adding a thick layer of mulch will help you meet both goals” “and grasses can easily crowd out the plants, so remove all extraneous plant materials; with an early enough head start, you can even sterilize
“Asparagus.” — almostjane
Northern Virginia Landscape Architect and Designer
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Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
2 Reviews
Asters.JPG
Ideabooks1,193
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Aster x frikartii -- Delicate-looking flowers on ultra-tough plants tolerate just about any soil type. ‘Mönch’ grows to 2 feet-tall and pumps out 2 1/2-inch lavender-blue flowers almost all year if spent ones are removed. ‘Wonder of Staffa’
Potential use for corner planting. not sure about drought tolerance. (+/-)
Aromatic aster blooms late grows in any soil takes sun
Astor, Native, dry, hot, nasty soil
October Skies aster blooms the whole mo of October and prefers dry, "nasty" soil. It has a clumping tendency
United States, where it's too hot and humid for cool-season grasses, yet too cool for warm-season grasses. It is adapted to many soil types but prefers well-drained clay soils, and it does fairly well in more shaded conditions. Although not native to the United States, it is well adapted and widely found
“Stauden 9” — Julia Tismer
Kim Gamel
4 Reviews
Cohan container gardens
Ideabooks499
Questions1
purchase potting soil for container gardens, as opposed to garden soil, which compacts too easily, preventing a healthy flow of air and water around your plants' root systems.
You want to make sure you purchase potting soil for container gardens, as opposed to garden soil, which compacts too easily, preventing a healthy flow of air and water around your plants' root systems.
es of plants. Also, I don't make my own soil mixture, so this gives me some ideas.
mediums don’t contain actual soil, since it's difficult to obtain mass quantities of quality soil that is free of toxins, weeds and diseases. You want to make sure you purchase potting soil for container gardens, as opposed to garden soil, which compacts too easily, preventing a healthy flow of air and water
“colors” — ccadoc
Amy Renea
Spring Garden
Ideabooks70
Questions0
the roots and spacing them about 1 1/2 to 2 feet apart for most berries, 8 to 12 inches apart for alpine strawberries. Keep the base of each plant’s crown level with or just slightly above the soil; plant too deep and the crown will rot. Cover the roots completely with soil and firm it in place. If heavy
using containers. Work a complete fertilizer into the soil, and if you want, build small hills or mounds to elevate the plants slightly and create watering basins or furrows. Set the plants in place, spreading out the roots and spacing them about 1 1/2 to 2 feet apart for most berries, 8 to 12 inches
the roots and spacing them about 1 1/2 to 2 feet apart for most berries, 8 to 12 inches apart for alpine strawberries.Keep the base of each plant’s crown level with or just slightly above the soil; plant too deep and the crown will rot. Cover the roots completely with soil and firm it in place. If heavy
“Planting: However you plan to plant, choose a site with very rich, well-drained (even sandy), slight” — rdennis60
Steve Masley Consulting and Design
5 Reviews
SaladScapes
Ideabooks269
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SaladScape of 'Mervielles des Quatre Saison' (French Four Season) lettuces. The side box is ready to harvest, the top tray about 2 weeks from harvest. Photo by Steve Masley.
Good article on soil for container gardening
pot. The tapered pot exposes a greater percentage of its soil to direct sunlight, leading to dry soil faster. “The top few inches of soil are always dry, so that zone is basically useless for the plant,” he says. When you minimize the exposed soil, you minimize the amount that will dry out and help keep
pot. The tapered pot exposes a greater percentage of its soil to direct sunlight, leading to dry soil faster. “The top few inches of soil are always dry, so that zone is basically useless for the plant,” he says. When you minimize the exposed soil, you minimize the amount that will dry out and help keep
“Would love to do a small planter with just a variety of fresh herbs. Perhaps on the patio.” — gmevansdow
Andrew Keys
Baptisia_AK.jpg
Ideabooks1,093
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clay-busting miracle plant. At a mature size of about 4 feet tall and wide, it provides for many sulphur butterfly species, as well as the hoary edge butterfly. Full sun is best. Other Baptisia include:B. alba: Has white flowers and prefers moist soilB. bracteata: Shorter
clay-busting miracle plant. At a mature size of about 4 feet tall and wide, it provides for many sulphur butterfly species, as well as the hoary edge butterfly. Full sun is best. Other Baptisia include: B. alba: Has white flowers and prefers moist soil B. bracteata: Shorter B. sphaerocarpa: Has yellow
clay-busting miracle plant. At a mature size of about 4 feet tall and wide, it provides for many sulphur butterfly species, as well as the hoary edge butterfly. Full sun is best. Other Baptisia include: B. alba: Has white flowers and prefers moist soil B. bracteata: Shorter
“baptisia” — lacie629
Square Foot Gardening
Ideabooks1,433
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organizing crops works best in a raised bed and will maximize the surface area of your garden to produce large yields of crops. It entails dividing the soil area into 1-square-foot cells, using twine, wood or wire affixed in a grid format to the top of the raised bed. Different crops of vegetables can
each cell. When a crop is harvested, a different crop is replanted in the cell. This rotation of crops ensures that nutrients aren’t exhausted from the soil, and plants benefit from companion plantings that promote healthy growth and pest resistance.
organizing crops works best in a raised bed and will maximize the surface area of your garden to produce large yields of crops. It entails dividing the soil area into 1-square-foot cells, using twine, wood or wire affixed in a grid format to the top of the raised bed. Different crops of vegetables can then
“Cottage herb garden” — mclarenn
Priscilla Torres
Small Gardens
Ideabooks1,508
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container with well-amended potting soil and plant as described above.
Lettuce, spinach and many herbs don't need a lot of space, but beefy tomatoes and peppers want some growing room. Use potting mix designed to encourage container growth, not heavy garden soil. Water often.
potting soil and plant as described above.
Remove the bottom two sets of leaves from each transplant, whether nursery bought or started from seed. Dig a hole deep enough to cover the stem up to the bottom of the remaining leaves and add amendments. Set in the plants; add soil and firm
beefy tomatoes and peppers want some growing room. Second, you’ll need to use a potting mix designed to encourage container growth, not heavy garden soil, which can be too dense to allow plants to thrive. You’ll probably need to water more often; roots can’t work their way out of containers to reach water
“Plants” — hfjames
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