3,796 facts about soil.html Home Design Photos

Michelle
Frenchflair
Ideabooks642
Questions1
Cynthia, Your soil must be rich in aluminum for your hydrangea to get this dark blue. If it is not, an addition of aluminum sulfate on the soil, around the
(again, on these older cultivars) we have to add lime, which helps return the soil to a less acidic state. Just an FYI in case you prefer pink or purple flowers
Your soil must be rich in aluminum for your hydrangea to get this dark blue. If it is not, an addition of aluminum sulfate on the soil, Your soil must
soil must be rich in aluminum for your hydrangea to get this dark blue. If it is not, an addition of aluminum sulfate on the soil, around the
Cynthia, Your soil must be rich in aluminum for your hydrangea to get this dark blue. If it is not, an addition of aluminum sulfate on the soil, around the
“Growing hydrangeas/gardenias (in the front)/roses to pick and place inside the house.” — Chantelle Moore
Northern Virginia Premier Custom Design & Build Landscape Company
Listening to your landscaping needs, fulfilling your objectives for outdoor living spaces, and creating beauty to exceed your expectations continues to be our dedicated focus.
Sponsored
Plan-it Earth Design
5 Reviews
Rain Gardens
Ideabooks1,189
Questions0
Solutions for Soggy Soil Photo 1 of 11 When we were children, the combination of water
ditches are often either choked with weeds, covered in mud or robbed of their soil through erosion.
ditch or the mother lode: a gurgling brook in the woods. There’s something about moving water that still captivates us to this day. For those of us with the
“The rock for downspout” — chgilpin1
Rocco Fiore & Sons, Inc
Lake Forest Estate
Ideabooks3,269
Questions0
season. If you're planting them in the garden, choose a new spot each year, as soil diseases can be a problem. As a plus, while these are “flowering” varieties
season. If you're planting them in the garden, choose a new spot each year, as soil diseases can be a problem. As a plus, while these are “flowering” varieties
can take shade.Mature size: 1 foot to 1½ feetGrowing tips: Set your plants about 1½ feet apart in the garden or add them to containers after the hot weather
fall and winter garden.” — Marianne LipanovichWe’ve been learning so much about the edible versions of colder-weather vegetables lately that I’d almost forgotten
“Garden” — mbeste
Wendy Cutler
Quince
Ideabooks58
Questions0
fussy about soil type. Dig a hole as deep as and twice as wide as the rootball and set the plant in place, spreading out the roots. Fill in with soil and
when the soil can be worked; for bare-root trees, in late winter or spring; for container plants, between fall and early summer as long as the soil can be
Japanese quince tastes better, one to think about for new house??
and water thoroughly. Add mulch up to about 3 inches from the trunk to suppress weeds and prevent water loss. Remove any weak or crossing branches. If you
fussy about soil type. Dig a hole as deep as and twice as wide as the rootball and set the plant in place, spreading out the roots. Fill in with soil and
when the soil can be worked; for bare-root trees, in late winter or spring; for container plants, between fall and early summer as long as the soil can be
“tree idea” — jenevemwa
Noelle Johnson Landscape Consulting
bare root fruit tree.jpg
Ideabooks95
Questions0
sun with well-drained soil in late winter or early spring; container trees can be planted from fall to spring, as long as the soil can be worked and it’s
should be twice as wide as but no deeper than the rootball. Fill in with soil and water thoroughly. Add mulch as needed; don’t let it touch the trunk.
open. Start with about ¼ pound, then add another ¼ pound for the next few years until the trees mature. If the tree is growing about 6 inches a year, though
bookmarked this article about planting bare root plants.
sun with well-drained soil in late winter or early spring; container trees can be planted from fall to spring, as long as the soil can be worked and it’s
should be twice as wide as but no deeper than the rootball. Fill in with soil and water thoroughly. Add mulch as needed; don’t let it touch the trunk
“Bare root plants.” — birdiee
Andrew Keys
Snakebark maple (Acer pensylvanicum) in fall
Ideabooks236
Questions0
snakebark maple likes shade and cool, damp soil
understory tree, and it needs partial to full shade and cool, damp woodland soil to thrive.
branches that are bright red; partial to full shade and cool, damp woodland soil
understory tree, and it needs partial to full shade and cool, damp woodland soil to thrive.
goosefoot maple and moosewood (here and in first photo). A while ago I talked about hardy plants that looked tropical, and this is another one. Its big, rounded
“Fall color” — Kelly
CYAN Horticulture
10 Reviews
Contemporary Roof Garden, Armory District, Vancouver
Ideabooks489
Questions0
Loyalty, my friend; that's what it is all about. USDA zones: 6 or 7 to 9 Water requirement: Moist but well-drained soil Light requirement: Partial to full shade
Deltophylla USDA zones: 6 or 7 to 9 Water requirement: Moist but well-drained soil Light requirement: Partial to full shade Mature size: 1 foot tall and wide
Loyalty, my friend; that's what it is all about.USDA zones: 6 or 7 to 9Water requirement: Moist but well-drained soilLight requirement: Partial to full shadeMature
“Color contrast” — katemloftus
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
4 Reviews
Black-Eyed Susan / Rudbeckia hirta
Ideabooks129
Questions0
d in just about every U.S. state It’s a true biennial and a nice self-sower for a larger area. Best grown in medium to slightly moist soils, it is also
ed in just about every U.S. stateIt’s a true biennial and a nice self-sower for a larger area. Best grown in medium to slightly moist soils, it is also
Rockies east, it will thrive in full to partial sun in slightly moist to dry soils. It prefers disturbed areas and tends to be the first to colonize them,
“Black eyed Susan.” — lfsullivan
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™