532,143 new england Home Design Photos

Birdseye Design
4 Reviews
Mallets Bay Shingle
Ideabooks3,394
Questions3
New England Ralph Lauren style.....vintage Polo vibe.
New England style home.
New England style home
Cool New England style home
New England
“color of shingles” — wendybeiswenger
Lear & Mahoney Landscape Associates
4 Reviews
Town Line Road Sagaponack New York
Ideabooks1,784
Questions1
Town Line Road Sagaponack New York
captain’s mansion in New England for $6 and walk away with a pocketful of details,” she says. All this will help inform your (and your designer’s, if you will be using one) choices of colors, materials and accessories.
lifestyle — form a solid combination for a welcoming bathroom. A sense of place. First, decide which beach will be your inspiration. The beaches of New England are way different than the ones in Florida, in the Caribbean or up and down California’s coast. “There are beaches that are rocky and moody with
1. A sense of place. First, decide which beach will be your inspiration. The beaches of New England are way different than the ones in Florida, in the Caribbean or up and down California’s coast. “There are beaches that are rocky and moody with
“Colors for my home...” — angelamc1024
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
2 Reviews
MM2.JPG
Ideabooks239
Questions0
Photo Botanical name: Pycnanthemum virginianum Common name: Mountain mint Origin: Native to the Central Plains, northern and eastern Midwest, and New England USDA zones: 3 to 7 (find your zone) Water requirement: Moist to dry (it's adaptable) Light requirement: Full sun to partial shade Mature size: Slowly
Botanical name: Pycnanthemum virginianum Common name: Mountain mint Origin: Native to the Central Plains, northern and eastern Midwest, and New England USDA zones: 3 to 7 (find your zone) Water requirement: Moist to dry (it's adaptable) Light requirement: Full sun to partial shade Mature size: Slowly
Botanical name: Pycnanthemum virginianumCommon name: Mountain mintOrigin: Native to the Central Plains, northern and eastern Midwest, and New EnglandUSDA zones: 3 to 7 (find your zone)Water requirement: Moist to dry (it's adaptable)Light requirement: Full sun to partial shadeMature size: Slowly spreading
“bought @ digging dog?” — irka
Piscataqua Landscaping & Tree Service
Piscataqua Landscaping & Tree Service - Hardscape
Ideabooks1,033
Questions0
pathway: A yatsuhashi pattern should not be limited to Asian or contemporary gardens. Here we see this pattern effectively used in a traditional New England–style space. The walkway angles mimic the footprint of the house, again creating that homogenous feeling. The illusion here is that the eye is slowed
l Photo A yatsuhashi pattern should not be limited to Asian or contemporary gardens. Here we see this pattern effectively used in a traditional New England–style space. The walkway angles mimic the footprint of the house, again creating that homogenous feeling. The illusion here is that the eye is slowed
A yatsuhashi pattern should not be limited to Asian or contemporary gardens. Here we see this pattern effectively used in a traditional New England–style space. The walkway angles mimic the footprint of the house, again creating that homogenous feeling. The illusion here is that the eye is slowed
“A nice alternative to the more expensive round patio.” — katina_leodas
Crisp Architects
45 Reviews
Crisp Architects
Ideabooks4,915
Questions5
House colors, white and New Orleans Green perhaps?
Whether British and French in New England or Spanish in the South and Southwest, the initial settlers built what they knew and were familiar with. But, of course, they adapted the styles to their new locations and the materials at hand. For example, a house in New England would have had smaller and fewer
“like colors and small portico” — keheck
Kerrie L. Kelly
48 Reviews
Architecture Walk: Exterior Styles and Palettes
Ideabooks7,540
Questions8
About to put a new roof on my colonial style house looks very similar to the one in this picture
This is a lovely design! A great, cozy new-england feel
often quite colorful on the inside, but less so on the exterior. New England homes reflect the area's traditional values, rich history and landscape of rolling green hills, slate-colored mountains and subdued gray waters. New Englanders prefer a conservative palette for exterior siding, and pick lighter
“Double roof?” — Suezy Tedford
Union Studio, Architecture & Community Design
Sandywoods Farm
Ideabooks21,342
Questions18
This question is not a new one. House color. Is it a brown grey?
in a neighborhood of affordable artists' housing, respects its rural New England surroundings. Red is a traditional color for agricultural structures, and the area includes working farmland.
Front gables. This rural New England front-gabled house respects the scale of its precedents. The tall two-story
“Siding” — jack4469
Katz Builders, Inc.
24 Reviews
Shoal Creek Custom Home Five Star Energy
Ideabooks717
Questions1
windows, depending on which region you live in ($146 in California; $501 in New England), and between $71 and $247 when replacing double-pane windows with Energy Star–rated ones ($71 in California, $247 in Florida and $208 in New England).Mixing brands and energy efficiencies based on your house’s position
“Clean lines” — Stephanie Brundage
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