Big Girls Small Kitchen
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My Kitchen eclectic-kitchen
 

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Small kitchen tip: Put your prettiest foods out on display. Eisenpress' jars of pickled goods add color and interest to her kitchen windowsill. Q. What are three of your kitchen luxuries or accessories that you love?A. Does truffle salt count? It really ups the ante on foods from eggs to toast. I also love my Le Creuset pots, and I just got a copper saucepan that's amazing for making fruit jams and syrups.
Margie Grace - Grace Design Associates added this to California Gardener: What to Do in July
Share the bounty: I send out apricot jam to friends early in the season and enjoy abundant produce throughout the summer in return. Canned peaches and pears; plum, tomato and strawberry jams; honey; dried fruit; bouquets; and bushels of fresh fare are just a few of the backyard treats that come my way from folks who’ve enjoyed the bounty from my garden.
Laura Gaskill added this to 14 To-Dos to Make the Most of Summer
10. Preserve the harvest. The next time you come into a bounty of peak-of-season perfect produce — whether it's from your own garden or a farm stand — get enough to put some by for later. Canning is a popular choice for preserving fruits, but if boiling jars isn't your idea of fun on a hot summer day, consider freezing your haul instead. Just spread out berries or sliced peaches on a baking sheet and freeze them so they don't stick together, then dump them into labeled freezer bags.
4. Set a good example. You set the tone for the type and amount of gifts that others give you. If you are always giving tons of presents, your friends and family members may feel that’s what you expect from them too! If you want to receive fewer gifts, scale back your own giving first. Start a tradition of giving experiences, consumables and donations to charitable organizations close to your heart. These options can be fully enjoyed without having to be or displayed in the house. Here are some examples:Instead of kitchen gear, homemade preserves or cooking lessons.Instead of toys, a membership to a local children’s museumInstead of clothes or jewelry, a gift certificate to a salon or an appointment with a stylistInstead of artwork, a trip to the city to go gallery hoppingInstead of decor, a donation to Habitat for HumanityFor children, things are trickier — but it is possible to limit gifts and make the experience of birthdays and holidays more meaningful. Try scaling back your child’s expectations a bit, focusing on the few things they really, really want to get, instead of thinking of birthdays as a massive gift extravaganza. One option is to welcome gifts from close family members but write, “No gifts please!” on the party invites that go out to the class.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lauragoldman added this to lauragoldman's ideas
December 25, 2014
Set a good example. You set the tone for the type and amount of gifts that others give you. If you are always giving tons of presents, your friends and family members may feel that’s what you expect from them too! If you want to receive fewer gifts, scale back your own giving first. Start a tradition of giving experiences, consumables and donations to charitable organizations close to your heart. These options can be fully enjoyed without having to be or displayed in the house. Here are some examples: Instead of kitchen gear, homemade preserves or cooking lessons. Instead of toys, a membership to a local children’s museum Instead of clothes or jewelry, a gift certificate to a salon or an appointment with a stylist Instead of artwork, a trip to the city to go gallery hopping Instead of decor, a donation to Habitat for Humanity
Deborah Staley Matthiesen added this to Storage
October 27, 2014
Pairing down stuff ◦Instead of kitchen gear, homemade preserves or cooking lessons. ◦Instead of toys, a membership to a local children’s museum ◦Instead of clothes or jewelry, a gift certificate to a salon or an appointment with a stylist ◦Instead of artwork, a trip to the city to go gallery hopping ◦Instead of decor, a donation to Habitat for Humanity
nitaboogiemom added this to Kitchen Ideas
October 23, 2014
YUM!
Carrie Cowherd added this to Living
September 15, 2014
gift giving for clean living
bluanne added this to Craft/Decor Ideas
September 11, 2014
Set a good example. You set the tone for the type and amount of gifts that others give you. If you are always giving tons of presents, your friends and family members may feel that’s what you expect from them too! If you want to receive fewer gifts, scale back your own giving first. Start a tradition of giving experiences, consumables and donations to charitable organizations close to your heart. These options can be fully enjoyed without having to be or displayed in the house. Here are some examples: ◦Instead of kitchen gear, homemade preserves or cooking lessons. ◦Instead of toys, a membership to a local children’s museum ◦Instead of clothes or jewelry, a gift certificate to a salon or an appointment with a stylist ◦Instead of artwork, a trip to the city to go gallery hopping ◦Instead of decor, a donation to Habitat for Humanity For children, things are trickier — but it is possible to limit gifts and make the experience of birthdays and holidays more meaningful. Try scaling back your child’s expectations a bit, focusing on the few things they really, really want to get, instead of thinking of birthdays as a massive gift extravaganza. One option is to welcome gifts from close family members but write, “No gifts please!” on the party invites that go out to the class.
lauralefaix added this to decluttering
September 10, 2014
Instead of kitchen gear, homemade preserves or cooking lessons. Instead of toys, a membership to a local children’s museum Instead of clothes or jewelry, a gift certificate to a salon or an appointment with a stylist Instead of artwork, a trip to the city to go gallery hopping Instead of decor, a donation to Habitat for Humanity
klbower added this to klbower's Favorites
September 10, 2014
Gift ideas instead of stuff
maryanrch added this to maryanrch's ideas
September 10, 2014
Great ideas
lyvigil added this to kitchen
July 8, 2013
10. Preserve the harvest. The next time you come into a bounty of peak-of-season perfect produce — whether it's from your own garden or a farm stand — get enough to put some by for later. Canning is a popular choice for preserving fruits, but if boiling jars isn't your idea of fun on a hot summer day, consider freezing your haul instead. Just spread out berries or sliced peaches on a baking sheet and freeze them so they don't stick together, then dump them into labeled freezer bags.
rainalee added this to rainalee's Ideas
July 8, 2013
Jam
verlabenson123 added this to verlabenson123's ideas
June 30, 2013
frozen fruit
wtravis added this to wtravis's ideas
June 26, 2013
freeze fruit
jeanlscarey added this to Kitchen Ideas
May 31, 2013
display my home grown foods
fgriffith27 added this to kitchen
July 28, 2012
Display of colorful food
cloudhouse added this to cloudhouse's Ideas
July 1, 2012
Still life quality of the preserve jars, highlights, earth tone setting
Rachel McGovern added this to Kitchen
June 8, 2012
decorate with the preserves!
Ruth Hoyt added this to Kitchen Ideas
June 4, 2012
Display of home-canned foods-- lovely!
Marisa Cabral added this to marisa_cabral's ideas
June 4, 2012
de tudo, tem ótimas ideias!
trublusu added this to trublusu's ideas
June 4, 2012
put your prettiest food on the window sill
kpfarrell added this to kpfarrell's ideas
June 3, 2012
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