Jocelyn H. Chilvers
Landscape Architects & Designers
prickly lettuce (weed) contemporary-landscape
 

prickly lettuce (weed)

hand pulling weed (prickly lettuce)
photo by Jocelyn H. Chilvers
URL
http://jocelynsgarden.blogspot.com/

This photo has one question

September 30, 2012
toddntina wrote:
Why post this photo? - Really?

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Jocelyn H. Chilvers added this to 5 Ways to Naturally Win the Weed War
3. Don’t let weeds develop root systems. Deny the plant its own food factory. Foliage + sunshine = nourishment for roots. Pull, prune or chop off all stems and leaves. Plants may fight back with thorns or irritating sap, so be sure to wear gloves when fighting mano a mano.
Jocelyn H. Chilvers added this to Rocky Mountain Gardener's August Checklist
Keep up with weed control. Sadly, weeds don’t take a vacation. They continue to grow, stealing water and nutrients from your chosen plants. Here are some tips for nonchemical weed suppression. Chemical herbicides, when necessary, are best applied in another month or two.
J. Peterson Garden Design added this to Give Your Turf the Fall Tune-up It Deserves
4. Control weeds. September and October are the best months to control perennial broadleaf weeds like clover and dandelions. These weeds are busy taking in sun and nutrients to get them through the winter months, so that means they are open to receiving weed killers as well. If you have just a few weeds, pull them out by hand, but more numerous weeds may require additional tactics or chemicals — either organic or nonorganic. As with fertilizers, always follow the package directions when applying any chemical to your lawn to avoid damaging it and the surrounding plants. Don't worry about any bare spots left by weed removal; your healthy grass will take over those areas in no time.
How you will maintain your outdoor space is lifestyle driven as well. Every landscape needs maintenance to keep the plants healthy and the hardscape looking its best. Consider your time and abilities for maintenance when planning your new yard. High-maintenance landscapes are for dedicated gardeners and plantaholics (and you know who you are!) who love to work in the yard.Low-maintenance landscapes are for those who enjoy being outdoors and doing a bit of puttering.No-maintenance landscapes are for those who will hire a professional maintenance company.
J. Peterson Garden Design added this to Texas Gardener's April Checklist
Stay on Top of Garden MaintenanceIf you continue with regular maintenance chores this month, your garden will thrive throughout the hotter summer months. And if the forecast is right, it's going to be another hot and dry season.Weed. Hand pick stray weeds before they go to seed or spread, but be sure to pull them out by the roots rather than breaking them off at the soil surface. Use chemical weed controls only when needed, depending upon the severity of your weed problem. There are many organic options available that are kinder to the surrounding environment, but use caution when applying a solution of any kind — those that are labeled "nonselective herbicides," whether they are organic or not, will kill any plant that they are sprayed on.Fertilize. Spray a seaweed solution on your bedding plants once a week for lush growth and blooming. Fertilize established trees, shrubs and other plants with a balanced fertilizer, and go light on fertilizing newly planted transplants. Fertilize your lawn with a low-nitrogen fertilizer and water it in thoroughly. Use a water-soluble fertilizer for container plants and houseplants. Always follow the package directions, as overfertilizing can actually harm your plants.
Alison Hodgson added this to Portrait of a Terribly Good Neighbor
The gardens were already looking scruffy when one of the two towering pines at the back of Billy's property was hit by lightning. The top 20 feet fell over but not completely off. Billy owns a portable sawmill and considered milling the boards but never got around to it, so almost half the tree dangled there with a mess of branches under it for a couple years.In the meantime Diane, his neighbor, had been diagnosed with lung cancer. Billy took over meals and frequently checked in. Although Diane kept up her spirits up, the prognosis was grim. One day, when she and Billy were both outside, she pointed to the pines and said, "I'm afraid I'm going to die and that tree will still be there." Billy was preparing for the weeks-long trip he takes every summer for work. It was the worst time for him to deal with a big project, but he called a tree service to cut down the top of the tree and a friend to help him haul away the brush. Then he begged me to come over right away to tackle the gardens again.It was a steaming-hot day. I knew he was about to leave on his big trip. I also knew the beds had been neglected all summer, at least, and it was already August. I thought he may as well wait a few more weeks until the weather cooled and just do a big fall cleanup. I was happy to lend a hand, but what was the rush?He explained about Diane. He didn't know if she would still be alive in another month, and he wanted to do anything he could to help her. As ridiculous as it sounded, getting his yard cleaned up was probably her dying wish.
7. Practice appropriate landscape maintenance. Proper watering, weeding and fertilizing of plants, as well as maintaining and monitoring your irrigation system, will keep your landscape beautiful and conserve water too.More: How to Replace Your Lawn With a Garden
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to The Quotable Garden: Writings That Will Grab Your Heart
“To tip a weed from the earth is satisfying. There is a pale, crackling sound heard in the head and felt in the hand as the tenderest root fibers break from their holdfasts; then a bright, cheery crunch as the clump itself gives way. I like the weightiness of the clump; I like the way the weight lightens as the soil, shaken out, beaten out, spatters its sustenance back to the ground. There is a fine sensation of murder.” — Sara Stein, My Weeds: A Gardener’s BotanyI just get this snippet from Sara Stein. I mean, isn’t she so right on the money here? The feel of weed pulling is as satisfying as scratching a hard-to-reach itch. Finally, I’ll let you have the last quotation all to yourself, because it could not be any more true.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

suzismiles added this to Gardens
August 24, 2014
7. Practice appropriate landscape maintenance. Proper watering, weeding and fertilizing of plants, as well as maintaining and monitoring your irrigation system, will keep your landscape beautiful and conserve water too.
diane1951 added this to diane1951's ideas
May 15, 2014
Weed control
leaff added this to xeriscape - hardscape
April 24, 2014
7. Practice appropriate landscape maintenance. Proper watering, weeding and fertilizing of plants, as well as maintaining and monitoring your irrigation system, will keep your landscape beautiful and conserve water too.
tbennett4 added this to tbennett4's ideas
March 9, 2014
Jocelyn H. Chilvers Save to Ideabook Email Photo 7. Practice appropriate landscape maintenance. Proper watering, weeding and fertilizing of plants, as well as maintaining and monitoring your irrigation system, will keep your landscape beautiful and conserve water too
Kathie Waters added this to Horticulture Therapy
March 9, 2014
“To tip a weed from the earth is satisfying. There is a pale, crackling sound heard in the head and felt in the hand as the tenderest root fibers break from their holdfasts; then a bright, cheery crunch as the clump itself gives way. I like the weightiness of the clump; I like the way the weight lightens as the soil, shaken out, beaten out, spatters its sustenance back to the ground. There is a fine sensation of murder.” — Sara Stein, My Weeds: A Gardener’s Botany
chantaldesiree added this to Jardin
October 21, 2013
maleza.
cdbej added this to Exterior Ideas
August 25, 2013
weeds
J. Peterson Garden Design added this to Texas Gardeners' July Checklist
June 30, 2013
Control weeds. Stay on top of weeds, especially in new beds. Remove them by hand as you see them popping up, make sure you have 2-3" of shredded mulch in your beds to suppress weeds, use a hand-weeder to get to weeds with deeper roots, or use a hoe for larger areas with weeds. If you have a very large area that seems to be over-run with weeds, and you'd like to plant that area in the fall, consider solarizing that location. July and August are the perfect months for solarizing, as this practice uses the sun's strong rays to cook the pathogens and weeds that exist in the soil. Soak the area with water and then cover with clear, heavy duty plastic and secure the edges with rocks or bricks. Leave for two weeks, uncover, till up the weeds and soil and repeat the process. Any remaining weeds after this time can be sprayed with full-strength horticultural vinegar spray.
Mabel Goddard added this to mabel_goddard's ideas
June 30, 2013
Maintance
Marie Robbins added this to mdrobb1's ideas
April 25, 2013
Gardening weeds
Angeline added this to Backyard
April 17, 2013
Weed battles
kellywooley added this to backyard
April 5, 2013
Grass suggestions
bluanne added this to Outdoor Spaces
March 20, 2013
You may not know a lot about plants yet, but you can start by making a list of plant attributes that you like. Here are some ideas to get you started: •Native to your region •Fragrant
cbruvels added this to Garden / Greenhouse
March 4, 2013
3. Don’t let weeds develop root systems. Deny the plant its own food factory. Foliage + sunshine = nourishment for roots. Pull, prune or chop off all stems and leaves. Plants may fight back with thorns or irritating sap, so be sure to wear gloves when fighting mano a mano.
tattookitty3 added this to shay easthope idea book
February 7, 2013
texture. i think that this picture shows tons of texture from the fabric of the glove to the vains in the leaf. Texture is also present in the hairs/thorns on the edge of the leaf and the steam. The glove has many changes in texture, one by the worn out finger tip looking very soft, and two being the roughness of the leather on the top of the tips of the finger.
kiandy added this to kiandy's ideas
January 6, 2013
low maintenance
neline added this to garden
September 18, 2012
. Control weeds. September and October are the best months to control perennial broadleaf weeds like clover and dandelions. These weeds are busy taking in sun and nutrients to get them through the winter months, so that means they are open to receiving weed killers as well.
bayviewlib added this to Lawn Landscaping
September 16, 2012
Weed tips
jb22soren added this to jb22soren's Ideas
September 3, 2012
Weeds
marsharebel added this to GARDENING
August 28, 2012
3. Don’t let weeds develop root systems. Deny the plant its own food factory. Foliage + sunshine = nourishment for roots. Pull, prune or chop off all stems and leaves. Plants may fight back with thorns or irritating sap, so be sure to wear gloves when fighting mano a mano.
© 2015 Houzz Inc. Houzz® The new way to design your home™