Large Italian Majolica Umbrella Stand Vase

$1,199
Listed Price:
Quantity: Sold Out
Free Shipping! Only 1 Left!
Product Details
Item #: P-25-0
Dimensions (inches): 18.75H x 15W x 12D
Comment: Standing at nearly 19 inches high, this large Italian Majolica Umbrella Stand Jardiniere Vase will be the star of your majolica collection! The hand-painted finish is blue and brushed gold, and the raised fruit surrounded by green leaves is literally cascading down the sides of this umbrella stand! Cherries, pears, pomegranates and grapes add visual interest with their pretty, hand-crafted details. You certainly could use this large majolica vase as a jardiniere or planter as it comes with a ceramic disc that is meant to allow water to drain when used as an umbrella stand. However, this beautiful vase would look just as lovely filled with dried flowers or foliage and sitting in a corner or entryway. Bring this cheerful majolica umbrellas stand or jardiniere home today and she will brighten your day!
Origin: Italy
Date: Contemporary
Material: CERAMIC
The word ceramic originates from the ancient Greek word keramikos, meaning potteres clay. The practice of making ceramics has been in existence for nearly 30,000 years. Clay, the primary ingredient for any ceramic, is primarily made of aluminum silicate, which is a malleable soil from crumbling rocks. Ceramics can be grouped according to the type of clay used, the temperature at which the clay is fired, and the duration of the firing.
Condition
Condition: GOOD
In overall good condition. Antique and vintage items by their very nature show normal wear to finish and miscellaneous scratches, nicks, and dings due to age and use. As we define 'good condition' relative to the stated age of the piece, we would expect to see 'character marks' consistent with that age and could include nicks or dings to a wooden, metal, enamel, or chalkware object, wear to a painted surface, speckling on a mirror, crazing, wear to gilding, or manufacturing glaze skips in ceramic finish, wear to a label, and some original decorative trim may be missing. If ceramic/porcelain restoration has been done, it is of museum-quality so that it is hardly discernible and would be specifically mentioned in the listing. 'Good condition' could include very small fleabite chips or very small hairline cracks in any glass, ceramic, or marble item, but these would be specifically mentioned in the listing.
Item Specifics: There has been professional ceramic restoration to one of the fruits on the side of the vase which is barely visible.
Shipping
Free Shipping: Free shipping only applies within the Contiguous 48 United States and this item will be shipped via a Ground shipping service (UPS or FedEx), approximate 1-6 business day shipping time. EuroLux may ship some packages via USPS Parcel Post, approximately 2-9 business day delivery time, at its sole discretion. All shipments include insurance.
Additional Information
Mark: EuroLux Home
Style: Majolica MAJOLICA, FAIENCE, AND DERUTA
The invention of a pottery glaze for decorative use with the addition of tin oxide to the slip of a lead glaze occurred in Persia before the 9th century. Tin glaze turns into opaque white enamel when fired. Majolica and faience are synonymous terms, which refer to hand-painted earthenware pottery on which a tin glaze has been used.
The term majolica has its origin in the name of the Spanish island, Majorca (Maiorca), which was a transshipping point for tin-glazed wares being transported from the kingdom of Aragon in Spain to Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries. This type of pottery drew inspiration from the Moorish influence in Spain. Ships arriving from Majorca landed at the port of Pisa, so it is easy to trace on a map how the production of majolica spread through Tuscany to the Umbria region with its rich deposits of clay in the hills around Orvieto, Gubbio and Deruta, and to Faenza in the Emilia Romagna area. The term faience is the French word for the city of Faenza, one of the major producers of majolica for export as early as the 15th century. Eventually the production of majolica, or faience, spread to France, Germany, Holland, Portugal, and England as well. Plateel is the Dutch word which means Majolica.
Italian majolica, or faience, reached its zenith in the 15th and 16th centuries, although it is still in production today. Several styles of decoration developed over the centuries and different cities had their own unique interpretations. Quick brush strokes and the Moorish influence of interwoven leaves, flowers, arabesques, birds and other animals are hallmarks of Italian majolica. Depictions of beautiful courtly ladies and gentlemen were popular, as well as the styles known as Ricco, Rafaellesco, Arabesco, and Gallo.
The Ricco style dates from the 15th century and is one of the most classic and enduring majolica styles. It is also known as Ricco Deruta or just Deruta, and is recognized by the use of blue, orange and yellow and a stylized fleur di lis with many swirls.
The Rafaellesco style dates from the 16th century and is attributed to the Italian Renaissance master artist, Raphael, who created the stylized dragon as a symbol of good luck and fair winds (notice the puffs of wind coming from the dragones mouth) for the seagoing merchants of the era. Bright yellow and blue are the predominant colors.
Birds are the central motif of both the Arabesco and Gallo styles. The Arabesco style features a dove on an abstract background and was commonly painted in blue, red, green, or in polychrome. The Gallo, or Rooster, style originated in Orvieto and features the symbol of good luck in Italy, the crowing rooster. Like the Arabesco style, the Gallo style is found in blue, red, green, or in polychrome.
Object: Vase
The Fine Print

Because EuroLux Antiques maintains its own website and lists on other online sites, while also operating a physical store location in Newberry, South Carolina, we reserve the right to end any listing early if it has not been purchased outright or no bids have been placed upon the item. On occasion, a piece listed on a website may no longer be available. We do our best to maintain the accuracy of our inventory records but we often have customers interested in the same item at the same time. In those cases, we defer to the customer who placed the earlier order. We apologize in advance by any inconvenience this may cause. Because of this, we encourage all of our buyers to purchase the item as quickly as possible so that your treasured find doesn't sell elsewhere to someone else. Happy browsing and thanks! Aimee & Greg Talbot at EuroLux Antiques.

Product Specifications

Manufactured By
EuroLux Home  
Sold By
EuroLuxHome  
Width
15.0" 
Depth
12.0" 
Height
18.75" 
Materials
Ceramic 
Category
Vases  
Style
Traditional 
Ready to ship to the Continental U.S. in 1 - 5 days.

Product Description

Product Details
Item #: P-25-0
Dimensions (inches): 18.75H x 15W x 12D
Comment: Standing at nearly 19 inches high, this large Italian Majolica Umbrella Stand Jardiniere Vase will be the star of your majolica collection! The hand-painted finish is blue and brushed gold, and the raised fruit surrounded by green leaves is literally cascading down the sides of this umbrella stand! Cherries, pears, pomegranates and grapes add visual interest with their pretty, hand-crafted details. You certainly could use this large majolica vase as a jardiniere or planter as it comes with a ceramic disc that is meant to allow water to drain when used as an umbrella stand. However, this beautiful vase would look just as lovely filled with dried flowers or foliage and sitting in a corner or entryway. Bring this cheerful majolica umbrellas stand or jardiniere home today and she will brighten your day!
Origin: Italy
Date: Contemporary
Material: CERAMIC
The word ceramic originates from the ancient Greek word keramikos, meaning potteres clay. The practice of making ceramics has been in existence for nearly 30,000 years. Clay, the primary ingredient for any ceramic, is primarily made of aluminum silicate, which is a malleable soil from crumbling rocks. Ceramics can be grouped according to the type of clay used, the temperature at which the clay is fired, and the duration of the firing.
Condition
Condition: GOOD
In overall good condition. Antique and vintage items by their very nature show normal wear to finish and miscellaneous scratches, nicks, and dings due to age and use. As we define 'good condition' relative to the stated age of the piece, we would expect to see 'character marks' consistent with that age and could include nicks or dings to a wooden, metal, enamel, or chalkware object, wear to a painted surface, speckling on a mirror, crazing, wear to gilding, or manufacturing glaze skips in ceramic finish, wear to a label, and some original decorative trim may be missing. If ceramic/porcelain restoration has been done, it is of museum-quality so that it is hardly discernible and would be specifically mentioned in the listing. 'Good condition' could include very small fleabite chips or very small hairline cracks in any glass, ceramic, or marble item, but these would be specifically mentioned in the listing.
Item Specifics: There has been professional ceramic restoration to one of the fruits on the side of the vase which is barely visible.
Shipping
Free Shipping: Free shipping only applies within the Contiguous 48 United States and this item will be shipped via a Ground shipping service (UPS or FedEx), approximate 1-6 business day shipping time. EuroLux may ship some packages via USPS Parcel Post, approximately 2-9 business day delivery time, at its sole discretion. All shipments include insurance.
Additional Information
Mark: EuroLux Home
Style: Majolica MAJOLICA, FAIENCE, AND DERUTA
The invention of a pottery glaze for decorative use with the addition of tin oxide to the slip of a lead glaze occurred in Persia before the 9th century. Tin glaze turns into opaque white enamel when fired. Majolica and faience are synonymous terms, which refer to hand-painted earthenware pottery on which a tin glaze has been used.
The term majolica has its origin in the name of the Spanish island, Majorca (Maiorca), which was a transshipping point for tin-glazed wares being transported from the kingdom of Aragon in Spain to Italy in the 14th and 15th centuries. This type of pottery drew inspiration from the Moorish influence in Spain. Ships arriving from Majorca landed at the port of Pisa, so it is easy to trace on a map how the production of majolica spread through Tuscany to the Umbria region with its rich deposits of clay in the hills around Orvieto, Gubbio and Deruta, and to Faenza in the Emilia Romagna area. The term faience is the French word for the city of Faenza, one of the major producers of majolica for export as early as the 15th century. Eventually the production of majolica, or faience, spread to France, Germany, Holland, Portugal, and England as well. Plateel is the Dutch word which means Majolica.
Italian majolica, or faience, reached its zenith in the 15th and 16th centuries, although it is still in production today. Several styles of decoration developed over the centuries and different cities had their own unique interpretations. Quick brush strokes and the Moorish influence of interwoven leaves, flowers, arabesques, birds and other animals are hallmarks of Italian majolica. Depictions of beautiful courtly ladies and gentlemen were popular, as well as the styles known as Ricco, Rafaellesco, Arabesco, and Gallo.
The Ricco style dates from the 15th century and is one of the most classic and enduring majolica styles. It is also known as Ricco Deruta or just Deruta, and is recognized by the use of blue, orange and yellow and a stylized fleur di lis with many swirls.
The Rafaellesco style dates from the 16th century and is attributed to the Italian Renaissance master artist, Raphael, who created the stylized dragon as a symbol of good luck and fair winds (notice the puffs of wind coming from the dragones mouth) for the seagoing merchants of the era. Bright yellow and blue are the predominant colors.
Birds are the central motif of both the Arabesco and Gallo styles. The Arabesco style features a dove on an abstract background and was commonly painted in blue, red, green, or in polychrome. The Gallo, or Rooster, style originated in Orvieto and features the symbol of good luck in Italy, the crowing rooster. Like the Arabesco style, the Gallo style is found in blue, red, green, or in polychrome.
Object: Vase
The Fine Print

Because EuroLux Antiques maintains its own website and lists on other online sites, while also operating a physical store location in Newberry, South Carolina, we reserve the right to end any listing early if it has not been purchased outright or no bids have been placed upon the item. On occasion, a piece listed on a website may no longer be available. We do our best to maintain the accuracy of our inventory records but we often have customers interested in the same item at the same time. In those cases, we defer to the customer who placed the earlier order. We apologize in advance by any inconvenience this may cause. Because of this, we encourage all of our buyers to purchase the item as quickly as possible so that your treasured find doesn't sell elsewhere to someone else. Happy browsing and thanks! Aimee & Greg Talbot at EuroLux Antiques.

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