Basements Before
 

Basements Before

This and other photos in the "basements before" folder illustrate an ideabook with recommendations about things to keep in mind with a basement remodel.
URL
http://www.ventanabuilds.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Shawn Gauthier added this to 10 Tips for Renovating Your Basement
6. Retrofit. If you live in earthquake country, don’t finish your basement without bolting down your foundation and installing shearwall at your pony walls (the short-framed wall between the foundation and the floor system, shown above) as they are at risk for failure in an earthquake. “Standard retrofitting involves nailing plywood to the face of that short wall, as well as connecting it to the foundation and the floor system above, if possible,” says Higuera. “It’s easy to do when the walls are open, and much more expensive after the fact.”7. Look ahead. Don’t finish your basement without thinking about future projects. Because the basement is the heart of most homes’ mechanical systems, you likely will need to get back in there to do any major work on your main floor, or for an addition. “If you’re planning on a kitchen remodel, run a few extra electrical circuits into the floor system. If a new bath is in your plans, run the waste and supply lines now," advises Higuera. “There’s nothing worse than having to remove and replace the work you’ve just put in to do a new project.”

What Houzzers are commenting on:

mrshansbury added this to mrshansbury's Ideas
August 13, 2014
Bolt foundation and add sheareall
bommarito added this to bommarito's ideas
April 18, 2013
If you live in earthquake country, don’t finish your basement without bolting down your foundation and installing shearwall at your pony walls (the short-framed wall between the foundation and the floor system, shown above) as they are at risk for failure in an earthquake. “Standard retrofitting involves nailing plywood to the face of that short wall, as well as connecting it to the foundation and the floor system above, if possible,” says Higuera. “It’s easy to do when the walls are open, and much more expensive after the fact.”
Jim Lefebvre added this to jim_lefebvre's ideas
January 20, 2013
retrofit walls
Michael Guiou added this to michael_guiou's ideas
November 5, 2012
good tips
misselsa added this to misselsa's ideas
August 29, 2012
Basement renovation in earthquake areas: bolt foundation to floor system above, and install shearwall--i.e., nail plywood to face of the short wall.
tomedge added this to tomedge's ideas
August 12, 2012
basement
Susan Isaacs, Realtor Coldwell Banker Dupont, D.C. added this to How To
August 12, 2012
How to renovate your basement http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/3588045/list/10-Tips-for-Renovating-Your-Basement
ranch1060 added this to lower level
August 12, 2012
What to to to the studs for tornado protection
deloresje added this to deloresje's ideas
August 10, 2012
Reduce noise. Your newly finished basement has the potential to affect the rest of your house with noise, particularly if you create a media or play room. Installing sound insulation into the basement ceiling can help. Higuera also suggests using RC channel, which is a long piece of metal shaped like a hat when viewed from the end. Without a sound break, sound travels through the wood right into the drywall. The RC channel is installed across the joists before the drywall. When it’s time for the drywall to be attached, it rests on the RC channel instead of the wood joists, reducing noise transmission. Another option? Surface-mount lights versus can lights. “Can lights tend to carry noise, so use surface-mount lights if your ceiling is high enough,” Higuera says.
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Category
Spaces  
Location
Seattle 
Keywords
basement remodel · furring · pony wall
 
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