Holm Design & Consulting LLC
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Wild Lupine landscape
 

Wild Lupine

Wild Lupine / Lupinus perennis

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Holm Design & Consulting LLC added this to Great Design Plant: Wild Lupine Dresses Up Rocky Gardens
Distinguishing traits. Wild lupine, a legume, has nitrogen-fixing nodules on its roots that help improve soil fertility. It thrives best in sandy, well-drained soil. The flowers open from the bottom of the spike upward, providing several weeks of bloom and interest. The early blue flowers fill an important gap in the garden or landscape in early spring where few other plants are flowering.How to use it. Wild lupine is an ideal native plant to use along the edge of a perennial planting where taller plants won’t compete with it. It also thrives in well-drained, dry rock gardens and boulevards.
“Wild lupine is an ideal native plant to use along the edge of a perennial planting where taller plants won’t compete with it. It also thrives in well-drained, dry rock gardens and boulevards.” — Heather HolmI have to admit a bias — lupine is my favorite plant. I get such a thrill when I arrive in Maine and see large swaths of it growing wild next to the highway. I’ve tried to plant it and failed several times, but hopefully with this guide, I’ll have better luck. Or maybe it’s just Mother Nature telling me to enjoy it where she’s decided to put it and not to get greedy.Full story: Great Design Plant: Wild Lupine Dresses Up Rocky Gardens

What Houzzers are commenting on:

ounoudo added this to Landscaping,garden, shed
August 28, 2014
Wild Lupine (Lupinus perennis)
ayhughes added this to garden
August 7, 2014
plant
Brown Bird Studio added this to Outside: Natural Garden Style
July 23, 2014
Native lupine, all over Montana in the mountains and valleys. Try this in a native grass home landscape.
riverside396 added this to Gardens
July 20, 2014
See Bookmark...Great Design Plant: Wild Lupine Dresses Up Rocky Gardens
lynnjoseph added this to Landscaping
July 9, 2014
Botanical name: Lupinus perennis Common name: Wild lupine
Di added this to garden
July 6, 2014
Lupine
diygoddess added this to garden ideas
June 26, 2014
Scatter around bank?
maryybreed added this to landscaping plants
June 25, 2014
Lupine - deer?
tdunlevy added this to Plants & Landscaping
June 24, 2014
Planting notes. Mature plants do not divide well, so the best propagation method is to collect and sow seeds. A mature wild lupine plant produces seedpods that contain several large seeds. The seeds do not require a period of cold stratification and can be sown right away in pots or in the ground when mature. The seeds do require scarification (scratching of the seed coat). This can be achieved by roughening the seed with some sandpaper. Following scarification, soak the seeds in water for 24 hours, then sow them.
mara99 added this to Landscaping | Gardens
June 23, 2014
Botanical name: Lupinus perennis Common name: Wild lupine Origin: Native from Minnesota eastward to Maine in the north and including Ontario, Canada, and south to Iowa, Illinois, Tennessee and eastward. Wild lupine also ranges down the eastern coastal states to Florida as well as the southern states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. This lupine is not the same as the much larger European introduction, large-leaved lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus), that has naturalized in the northern coastal states. Where it will grow: Hardy to -42 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 2b to 10b; find your zone) Typical plant communities: Oak savannahs, prairies, woodland edges and pine barrens Water requirement: Medium to dry well-drained soil; sand to sandy loam Light requirement: Full sun to partial shade Mature size: 1 foot to 2 feet tall and 1 foot to 1½ feet wide Benefits and tolerances: Requires well-drained soil, preferably neutral to acidic pH. May be short lived in soil with a high pH. Seasonal interest: Wild lupine has attractive palmate leaves and tall flower spikes with blue to purple pea-like flowers in May and June. The hairy seedpods persist throughout the summer, providing additional interest. When to plant: Spring or fall
fxgal added this to outdoors/ gardens
June 23, 2014
Wild Lupine
wgarri added this to Exterior Ideas
June 23, 2014
lupine for rocky gardens
nippyme added this to landscape
June 22, 2014
wild lupine
dcampeau added this to dcampeau's ideas
June 22, 2014
Wild lupine!
theaud added this to Landscape Ideas
June 22, 2014
Wild lupine
stevenphillips added this to Plants and planters
June 22, 2014
Native lupine: good for sandy soil, fixes nitrogen
battene added this to landscape
June 22, 2014
wild lupine
Nani Sa added this to plants
June 22, 2014
Botanical name: Lupinus perennis Common name: Wild lupine
ilbcnu added this to Landscaping
June 22, 2014
Botanical name: Lupinus perennis Common name: Wild lupine Origin: Native from Minnesota eastward to Maine in the north and including Ontario, Canada, and south to Iowa, Illinois, Tennessee and eastward. Wild lupine also ranges down the eastern coastal states to Florida as well as the southern states bordering the Gulf of Mexico. This lupine is not the same as the much larger European introduction, large-leaved lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus), that has naturalized in the northern coastal states. Where it will grow: Hardy to -42 degrees Fahrenheit (USDA zones 2b to 10b; find your zone) Typical plant communities: Oak savannahs, prairies, woodland edges and pine barrens Water requirement: Medium to dry well-drained soil; sand to sandy loam Light requirement: Full sun to partial shade Mature size: 1 foot to 2 feet tall and 1 foot to 1½ feet wide Benefits and tolerances: Requires well-drained soil, preferably neutral to acidic pH. May be short lived in soil with a high pH. Seasonal interest: Wild lupine has attractive palmate leaves and tall flower spikes with blue to purple pea-like flowers in May and June. The hairy seedpods persist throughout the summer, providing additional interest. When to plant: Spring or fall Distinguishing traits. Wild lupine, a legume, has nitrogen-fixing nodules on its roots that help improve soil fertility. It thrives best in sandy, well-drained soil. The flowers open from the bottom of the spike upward, providing several weeks of bloom and interest. The early blue flowers fill an important gap in the garden or landscape in early spring where few other plants are flowering. How to use it. Wild lupine is an ideal native plant to use along the edge of a perennial planting where taller plants won’t compete with it. It also thrives in well-drained, dry rock gardens and boulevards.
Meg added this to garden/patio
June 22, 2014
Lupine
ktrp added this to ktrp's ideas
June 21, 2014
wild fluorine. think we have European lupine
Derek Ahlberg added this to Thomas
June 21, 2014
Plant
barblinwil added this to Window molding
June 21, 2014
Lupine
Sigrid added this to Gardens
June 20, 2014
Lupinus Perennis, or "Wild Lupine" Native to Maine, try at cottage, Full sun to partial shade, This is not European Lupine and probably has some other common name outside NA.
improvementideas added this to gardens
June 20, 2014
Alpine lupins
ahboyden added this to Cambridge
June 20, 2014
Lupine
Estudio Castaño added this to Plants/Trees
June 20, 2014
Wild lupine (Lupinus perennis).
Kat S. added this to Landscaping
June 20, 2014
wild lupine
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