Amy Renea
Photographers
Fall Decor eclectic-landscape
 

Fall Decor

Amy Renea of a Nest for All Seasons
URL
http://www.anestforallseasons.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

What to plant in a dye garden: Blueberries, blackberries, goldenrod (shown here), marigold, hibiscus, indigo and red cabbage can all be used to make natural dyes. Consult a good how-to book for natural-dye recipes and plan to experiment — natural colors are not as strong or as predictable as commercial dyes.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

designerparexcellance added this to designerparexcellance's ideas
June 10, 2014
color contrasts
michelecas added this to michelecas's ideas
May 27, 2014
plants
rodneygb added this to rodneygb's ideas
May 26, 2014
LOVE
nimime added this to Gardens
May 25, 2014
What to plant in a dye garden: Blueberries, blackberries, goldenrod (shown here), marigold, hibiscus, indigo and red cabbage can all be used to make natural dyes. Consult a good how-to book for natural-dye recipes and plan to experiment — natural colors are not as strong or as predictable as commercial dyes.
Anne Power added this to poweranne’s ideas
May 25, 2014
What to plant in a dye garden: Blueberries, blackberries, goldenrod (shown here), marigold, hibiscus, indigo and red cabbage can all be used to make natural dyes. Consult a good how-to book for natural-dye recipes and plan to experiment — natural colors are not as strong or as predictable as commercial dyes
homeisnotplaces added this to Greenspaces
May 25, 2014
Goldenrod
nadoendo added this to back yard
May 25, 2014
What to plant in a dye garden: Blueberries, blackberries, goldenrod (shown here), marigold, hibiscus, indigo and red cabbage can all be used to make natural dyes. Consult a good how-to book for natural-dye recipes and plan to experiment — natural colors are not as strong or as predictable as commercial dyes.
Faith Mitchell Pappano added this to landscaping
May 25, 2014
natural dye
Amy Renea added this to Flush with Goldenrod
September 16, 2012
Goldenrod grows in zones 4-9 across much of the country and can be a nuisance on farmland and in residential gardens. They can be invasive, but some also have edible flowers and attract beneficial wildlife. I don't think I would plant goldenrod, but I would certainly weed it and display it.
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