decordemon
Interior Designers & Decorators
Brian Patrick Flynn
 

Brian Patrick Flynn

URL
http://www.decordemon.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Break. When I hear the word break in relation to interior design, I often think (a) bones of a contractor falling off a ladder, or (b) valuable glass or ceramic items being smashed to pieces along with my soul as it thinks of how I'll have to replace it. When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change. Hmmmm, the next time your kid needs help with geometry homework, perhaps you should call the seamstress over.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

bexff added this to WINDOW TREATMENTS
November 30, 2014
How it hits the floor. Not the drapes.
D H Design added this to DH Design Photo IDEAS
October 7, 2014
Break is a term used in drapery for the bottom seam which should be about 1/4" from the floor. Can also puddle the floor.
charlikeshouses added this to charlikeshouses's Ideas
October 5, 2014
Keep curtains 1/4 inch off of floor
ruthsteadman added this to ruthsteadman's Ideas
June 16, 2014
Length of drapes
dovesong888 added this to Window Treatments
September 25, 2013
When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs.
102xuanthuy added this to DRAPERIES
September 22, 2013
Break. When I hear the word break in relation to interior design, I often think (a) bones of a contractor falling off a ladder, or (b) valuable glass or ceramic items being smashed to pieces along with my soul as it thinks of how I'll have to replace it. When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change. Hmmmm, the next time your kid needs help with geometry homework, perhaps you should call the seamstress over.
stfisher added this to living room
August 16, 2013
When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change.
alexraben added this to windows
June 30, 2013
Drapery textbook
psu98 added this to Dining Room
June 28, 2013
1/4 inch off floor
5859hwy added this to Bedroom Ideas
March 24, 2013
Curtain details
brendab1941 added this to brendab1941's ideas
March 24, 2013
1/4" above the floor
Lisa Silver added this to Curtains
February 3, 2013
If you want curtains to end just before they touch the floor it will require even floors. Especially if you have lots of them to do around a room, or they will look wonky. It is much easier to have curtains slightly pool on the floor so you don't have worry about them being slightly different.
moonbeam808 added this to moonbeam808's ideas
November 10, 2012
Living room
ashleyfrey40 added this to Windows
October 31, 2012
Break. When I hear the word break in relation to interior design, I often think (a) bones of a contractor falling off a ladder, or (b) valuable glass or ceramic items being smashed to pieces along with my soul as it thinks of how I'll have to replace it. When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change. Hmmmm, the next time your kid needs help with geometry homework, perhaps you should call the seamstress over.
leninha added this to Draperies
October 27, 2012
1/4 inch off floor
Laurie Fowler added this to curtains
October 22, 2012
'break' = where curtain touches floor. Traditional break is 1/4" off the floor. 1/2" 'puddle' can look nice (no indoor animals, though, or it's a hair collector)
Jewel Stafford added this to Window Treatments
October 18, 2012
Break (length)
dgabe added this to windows and doors
October 18, 2012
Break. When I hear the word break in relation to interior design, I often think (a) bones of a contractor falling off a ladder, or (b) valuable glass or ceramic items being smashed to pieces along with my soul as it thinks of how I'll have to replace it. When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change
jdjewell added this to jdjewell's ideas
October 14, 2012
inverted-box-pleat'>Inverted box pleat
dmariott added this to 0k - best of the best
October 9, 2012
inverted pleat, blackout liner, 1/4" above floor
deboracox added this to deboracox's ideas
August 4, 2012
curtain length
champion66 added this to champion66's Ideas
August 3, 2012
drapery pattern
meldav4 added this to Home
July 9, 2012
Drapery height
karina6 added this to karina6's Favorites
September 21, 2011
1/4 inch from floor
Betty Jo Whatley added this to betty's ideas
September 17, 2011
more drapery information.
inezadams197 added this to inezadams197's ideas
May 25, 2011
Break. When I hear the word break in relation to interior design, I often think (a) bones of a contractor falling off a ladder, or (b) valuable glass or ceramic items being smashed to pieces along with my soul as it thinks of how I'll have to replace it. When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change. Hmmmm, the next time your kid needs help with geometry homework, perhaps you should call the seamstress over.
no1gardner added this to no1gardner's ideas
May 25, 2011
Break. When I hear the word break in relation to interior design, I often think (a) bones of a contractor falling off a ladder, or (b) valuable glass or ceramic items being smashed to pieces along with my soul as it thinks of how I'll have to replace it. When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change.
nana25 added this to nana25's ideas
May 25, 2011
Length od drape to floor. 1/2 inch off floor.
okiefarmer added this to okiefarmer's ideas
May 25, 2011
drapes
Sophia added this to Curtains
May 25, 2011
When it comes to window treatments, break is just a term for where the bottom of the drapery panel sits in relation to the floor. I often stick with 1/4 inch above the floor which keeps it from gathering dust and getting trampled on by dogs. For a more dramatic look, draperies can puddle on the floor or simply overlap an inch or two. Sure, it sounds easy; however, it's pretty much certain none of us have floors and ceilings that are perfectly level. Seamstresses play a huge game of mathematics to ensure the break is consistent from left to right, even though ceiling or floor pitches change.
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