John Hill
Media and Bloggers
Hurricane Irene modern
 

Hurricane Irene

Photos taken at a house north of New York City before and after (and one or two during) Hurricane Irene hit in August 2011.
URL
http://archidose.blogspot.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

4. Live with the sun, wind and land. But design is only half the story; the rest is actually living with the house. My appreciation of the architect's design came about because we embraced the sun when it shone (in the extreme, waking at sunrise and going to bed just after sunset; at other times simply sitting by the window to read), controlled the breezes through opening and closing windows and doors, and got out of the house to enjoy the spaces around the house when we could.These lessons are hardly comprehensive and are not meant as guidelines for designing a passive house, for example. They simply serve to illustrate some of what living in a well-designed house after a major storm taught me — or retaught me, to be more accurate. Ultimately it's helpful to see a house as having a reciprocal relationship with us: We impact a house when living in it, and in turn it impacts us. Therefore it's important to consider a house's design apart from the infrastructure and gizmos that it supports, not as a doomsday scenario but as a call for better responses to natural conditions. One way to gauge a house's success is to ask, "Would your house be comfortable without power for five days?" I know this Frank Lloyd Wright house was.More: 11 Ways to Hurricane Proof Your House

What Houzzers are commenting on:

borboletazul added this to Important things when building/renovating
November 24, 2012
4. Live with the sun, wind and land. But design is only half the story; the rest is actually living with the house. My appreciation of the architect's design came about because we embraced the sun when it shone (in the extreme, waking at sunrise and going to bed just after sunset; at other times simply sitting by the window to read), controlled the breezes through opening and closing windows and doors, and got out of the house to enjoy the spaces around the house when we could. These lessons are hardly comprehensive and are not meant as guidelines for designing a passive house, for example. They simply serve to illustrate some of what living in a well-designed house after a major storm taught me — or retaught me, to be more accurate. Ultimately it's helpful to see a house as having a reciprocal relationship with us: We impact a house when living in it, and in turn it impacts us. Therefore it's important to consider a house's design apart from the infrastructure and gizmos that it supports, not as a doomsday scenario but as a call for better responses to natural conditions. One way to gauge a house's success is to ask, "Would your house be comfortable without power for five days?" I know this Frank Lloyd Wright house was.
lindaraeclark added this to good design for a hurricane
November 6, 2012
. Live with the sun, wind and land. But design is only half the story; the rest is actually living with the house. My appreciation of the architect's design came about because we embraced the sun when it shone (in the extreme, waking at sunrise and going to bed just after sunset; at other times simply sitting by the window to read), controlled the breezes through opening and closing windows and doors, and got out of the house to enjoy the spaces around the house when we could. These lessons are hardly comprehensive and are not meant as guidelines for designing a passive house, for example. They simply serve to illustrate some of what living in a well-designed house after a major storm taught me — or retaught me, to be more accurate. Ultimately it's helpful to see a house as having a reciprocal relationship with us: We impact a house when living in it, and in turn it impacts us. Therefore it's important to consider a house's design apart from the infrastructure and gizmos that it supports, not as a doomsday scenario but as a call for better responses to natural conditions. One way to gauge a house's success is to ask, "Would your house be comfortable without power for five days?" I know this Frank Lloyd Wright house was. More: 11 Ways to Hurricane Proof Your House
slattanza added this to slattanza's ideas
October 31, 2012
Good info to remember
angad_mane added this to angad_mane's ideas
October 31, 2012
awesome
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