Janet Paik
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013.Rose Pruning Tips
 

013.Rose Pruning Tips

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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Annie Thornton added this to Expert Pruning Secrets for Exquisite Roses
Remove suckers. Many roses are grafted onto a root stalk of another rose type. Beneath the joint (bud union) is the root stalk, and above is the rose variety you are growing. Every once in a while you will see a vigorous straggler growing straight from the root stalk — these are suckers. Suckers have different leaves and a different form than the bush and need to be yanked from the base as soon as possible. Otherwise the rose bush will waste precious energy on the unwanted sucker.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

margielynnj added this to margielynnj's Ideas
August 24, 2014
Remove suckers. Many roses are grafted onto a root stalk of another rose type. Beneath the joint (bud union) is the root stalk, and above is the rose variety you are growing. Every once in a while you will see a vigorous straggler growing straight from the root stalk — these are suckers. Suckers have different leaves and a different form than the bush and need to be yanked from the base as soon as possible. Otherwise the rose bush will waste precious energy on the unwanted sucker
birdiee added this to my garden
January 19, 2014
Remove suckers.
satomimm added this to Landscape Ideas
January 19, 2014
Here Chuang has pruned 1/4 inch above a thick, healthy and outward-growing cane. The cut is angled out in the direction of growth and will promote an open, rounded plant. Make the cut. Rosarians may disagree on how much to prune, when to prune and what to prune, but they unanimously agree that the cut itself is important in promoting rose health. Cut 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud eye. Locate an outward-facing bud eye on a thick, healthy cane. A bud eye occurs just above the junction of a leaf (Chuang suggests five-leaflet leaves) and the cane — or at a dormant eye. The dormant eye is where a leaf used to be and resembles a swelling band. Leaving the leaves on the bush until the end of pruning makes it easier to identify where to cut. The cut signals the bush to send water and nutrients to that part of the bush. New growth will emerge from the bud eye in the direction of the cut. Cut at a 45-degree angle with the direction of leaf growth, away from the bud eye. This is the direction in which the new growth will emerge, so you will be promoting an open and outward-facing shrub. The angle also directs sap and water away from the bud eye, and naturally seals the cut. (Some rosarians suggest sealing cuts wider than a pencil with a sealant like Elmer’s Glue to prevent borers.)
jncastillo173 added this to jnc ideas
May 1, 2013
Remove suckers. Many roses are grafted onto a root stalk of another rose type. Beneath the joint (bud union) is the root stalk, and above is the rose variety you are growing. Every once in a while you will see a vigorous straggler growing straight from the root stalk — these are suckers. Suckers have different leaves and a different form than the bush and need to be yanked from the base as soon as possible. Otherwise the rose bush will waste precious energy on the unwanted sucker.
sandrabeauchemin added this to sandrabeauchemin's ideas
March 24, 2013
Pruning
esme2288 added this to GARDEN
March 24, 2013
Remove suckers. Many roses are grafted onto a root stalk of another rose type. Beneath the joint (bud union) is the root stalk, and above is the rose variety you are growing. Every once in a while you will see a vigorous straggler growing straight from the root stalk — these are suckers. Suckers have different leaves and a different form than the bush and need to be yanked from the base as soon as possible. Otherwise the rose bush will waste precious energy on the unwanted sucker.
da3125 added this to da3125's ideas
February 27, 2013
pruning
ocean77 added this to ocean77's ideas
February 27, 2013
roses5
lyvigil added this to how to
February 2, 2013
Remove suckers. Many roses are grafted onto a root stalk of another rose type. Beneath the joint (bud union) is the root stalk, and above is the rose variety you are growing. Every once in a while you will see a vigorous straggler growing straight from the root stalk — these are suckers. Suckers have different leaves and a different form than the bush and need to be yanked from the base as soon as possible. Otherwise the rose bush will waste precious energy on the unwanted sucker.
momsinger added this to momsinger's Favorites
January 29, 2013
Do this
angelamn added this to angelamn's ideas
January 27, 2013
Roses
amyvogt added this to amyvogt's ideas
January 27, 2013
rose pruning
lpapke added this to gardening
January 27, 2013
Rose info
CATHY WENTZ DESIGNS added this to butterflycw's ideas
January 27, 2013
PRUNING ROSES #3
Cassie Rathbun added this to cassie_rathbun's Ideas
January 26, 2013
Rose pruning
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