Passive Cooling contemporary-exterior
 

Passive Cooling

BedZED, a mixed-use, carbon-neutral development in Wallington, London, designed by Zedfactory.

Photo is by Flickr user Tom Chance, used under Creative Common license: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tomchance/1008213510/
URL
http://www.zedfactory.com/projects_mixeduse_bedzed.html

What Houzz contributors are saying:

The cowls serve two needs: ventilation and heat recovery. With the cowls no energy is required for ventilation, and in the colder months the heat kept in the house by the supertight envelopes is not lost in the process. The British Isles may not need air conditioning like, say, Florida, but the architects and engineers still had to address cooling.For one, internal heat gains from computers and other equipment in the north-facing work spaces (living spaces in the mixed-use development face south) are addressed through vents and the building's thermal inertia. The latter means that the buildings' roofs and walls absorb the heat from the equipment as well as a good deal of the outside heat in warmer months, therefore minimizing temperature swings between the day and night. After the sun goes down and the temperature drops, the built-up heat is released.
OK, boys. Here comes that tasty London fog. Open wide!

What Houzzers are commenting on:

moaid_subh added this to moaid_subh's ideas
June 18, 2014
roof idea
missbunnywatson added this to MBW5
June 18, 2014
Passive cooling.... Just too cute!
fmargarido added this to fmargarido's Ideas
March 31, 2014
Ventilação corredor
jojogogreen added this to jojogogreen's Ideas
March 7, 2014
Cool photo
jkyt added this to House exteriors
February 5, 2014
wind turbines?
sweeesis added this to sweeesis's ideas
January 25, 2014
Heat
abbeyteeters added this to G$
December 22, 2013
What is passive cooling? Other than catching wind?
neverperfect added this to neverperfect's ideas
December 15, 2013
a good way to distinguish a development
swsink added this to swsink's ideas
December 15, 2013
interesting use of passive cooling
trewalla added this to trewalla's Ideas
November 17, 2013
thinking
annakist added this to Guesthouses
July 7, 2013
BedZED
gabrielaponce added this to nhome
June 12, 2013
The cowls serve two needs: ventilation and heat recovery. With the cowls no energy is required for ventilation, and in the colder months the heat kept in the house by the supertight envelopes is not lost in the process
robinrossi added this to robinrossi's Ideas
June 9, 2013
Whimsical
Vutthichai Pat added this to vutthichai_pat's Ideas
June 9, 2013
Save energy.
Wendy Haak added this to wendy_haak's ideas
June 6, 2013
great ways for disbersing heat in hot climates
Garden Artisans added this to moirawms's ideas
June 6, 2013
cool
kirangill added this to Facade
June 6, 2013
cooling ideas
banerjee_poulami added this to life without ac
June 5, 2013
the natural................the better
maestrellaluz added this to maestrellaluz's ideas
June 5, 2013
the solar panels and the colorful chimneys...
klgest added this to Energy
June 5, 2013
Wind Cowls help in ventilation and cooling
betsymix added this to betsymix's ideas
June 5, 2013
ecofriendly
sjavierb added this to sjavierb's ideas
June 5, 2013
no energy required for ventilation using COWLS
palm18gm added this to Jorge is inspired
June 5, 2013
great idea
lindaraeclark added this to design principles
June 5, 2013
BedZED (Beddington Zero Energy Development) is billed as "the U.K.’s largest mixed-use, carbon-neutral development," completed in 2002. A number of features (a biomass combined heat and power plant, onsite sewage treatment and a rainwater recycling system, to name just a few) are used in pursuit of this goal, but it's the natural wind-driven ventilation that steals the show. Topping the buildings are rows of wind cowls, which — like the chimneys of yore — give the development a distinctive (and colorful) profile across the sky. Add to ideabook The cowls serve two needs: ventilation and heat recovery. With the cowls no energy is required for ventilation, and in the colder months the heat kept in the house by the supertight envelopes is not lost in the process. The British Isles may not need air conditioning like, say, Florida, but the architects and engineers still had to address cooling. For one, internal heat gains from computers and other equipment in the north-facing work spaces (living spaces in the mixed-use development face south) are addressed through vents and the building's thermal inertia. The latter means that the buildings' roofs and walls absorb the heat from the equipment as well as a good deal of the outside heat in warmer months, therefore minimizing temperature swings between the day and night. After the sun goes down and the temperature drops, the built-up heat is released.
sarah added this to roof
June 5, 2013
cowls serve two needs: ventilation and heat recovery. With the cowls no energy is required for ventilation, and in the colder months the heat kept in the house by the supertight envelopes is not lost in the process.
fremmafr added this to fremmafr's ideas
June 5, 2013
Windcowls again. UK
marks3 added this to marks3's Ideas
June 5, 2013
Roof heat recovery
lachydeplaya added this to lachydeplaya's Ideas
June 5, 2013
Energía renovable
drsusan added this to passive cooling
June 5, 2013
the natural wind-driven ventilation that steals the show. Topping the buildings are rows of wind cowls, which — like the chimneys of yore — give the development a distinctive (and colorful) profile across the sky.
Lena Gk added this to Architecture
June 5, 2013
BedZED (Beddington Zero Energy Development)
danakm added this to danakm's ideas
June 5, 2013
The cowls serve two needs: ventilation and heat recovery. With the cowls no energy is required for ventilation, and in the colder months the heat kept in the house by the supertight envelopes is not lost in the process. The British Isles may not need air conditioning like, say, Florida, but the architects and engineers still had to address cooling. For one, internal heat gains from computers and other equipment in the north-facing work spaces (living spaces in the mixed-use development face south) are addressed through vents and the building's thermal inertia. The latter means that the buildings' roofs and walls absorb the heat from the equipment as well as a good deal of the outside heat in warmer months, therefore minimizing temperature swings between the day and night. After the sun goes down and the temperature drops, the built-up heat is released.
jeanmoffat added this to jeanmoffat's Ideas
June 5, 2013
Ventilation and heat recovery cowls
sherrylo added this to sherrylo's ideas
June 5, 2013
Cooling and heating
Lenam Kvarnstrm added this to lenam_kvarnstrm's ideas
June 5, 2013
E architettura
Shalom Graphics added this to shalomjerome's ideas
June 5, 2013
concept
lavishdesigns added this to lavishdesigns's ideas
June 5, 2013
ventilation cowls
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