m.kotiuk
Photographers
Cornus sericea (redtwig dogwood) landscape
 

Cornus sericea (redtwig dogwood)

Photograph by m.kotiuk. Uploaded with written permission.
URL
http://www.flickr.com/photos/11213292@N05/5595246837/

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Annie Thornton added this to Great Design Plant: Redtwig Dogwood
How to use it. Consider adding a rain garden to your landscape to curb stormwater runoff. Found naturally in damp areas, redtwig dogwood is inherently suited wet conditions. During a time of year that most plants are on hiatus, redtwig dogwood is at the peak of its visual interest. A quick spreader and soil stabilizer, redtwig dogwood makes a great hillside or bank space filler. Plant in mass for a lush green screen in spring and summer and a fiery red landscape accent in fall and winter.
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Why Aggressive Plants Might Actually Be Your Friends
The difference between “aggressive” and “invasive.” They are not equal words. “Invasive” means that the plant crowds out local native plants, depriving those natives of sun and soil nutrients and generally changing the overall environment permanently. There are exotic plants that literally change the soil structure via microbes attached to their roots that make it impossible for natives to grow (this happens a lot on prairies, for example). “Invasive” carries connotations of severe ecological change to the detriment of local plants and wildlife. Yes, an aggressive native may produce a monoculture of its own, but I say three things toward that: 1. In “wild” nature, plants tend to colonize in drifts and masses (hence the fact that the New Perennial movement mimicking these natural drifts in is vogue); 2. One could argue that in many, though not all, instances, even aggressive native plants are part of the native ecology, and eventually other natives will get their turn as the climate changes and the herbivore patterns evolve from year to year; and 3. Aggressive native species can help us crowd out exotic invasives and restore some ecological balance. Obviously, the above points can change when you design a smaller garden. It’s really not a good idea to use aggressive plants in a small space, like an urban garden or a foundation bed.Shown: A natural drift of redtwig dogwood (Cornus sericea)

What Houzzers are commenting on:

lcdrum added this to Exterior - Grew hill
September 6, 2014
red twig
Marta Schulenburg added this to Marta Schulenburg's perfect garden ideas
June 15, 2014
everything!
selkirkpd added this to Landscaping
May 28, 2014
Rain garden for stormwater
iwaly added this to iwaly's Ideas
May 11, 2014
Couleurs
Susan M added this to landscape
May 5, 2014
Whole drifts of red twig dogwood!
pollypayne added this to pollypayne's Favorites
May 4, 2014
To paint.
sisterdavia added this to sisterdavia's ideas
May 4, 2014
Red twig dogwood
Robert Engberg added this to Landscaping
May 4, 2014
Red Osier Dogwood
Jane-Ashley Skinner added this to Garden and Landscape
May 4, 2014
redtwig dogwood
bookbear7 added this to outdoorscape
May 2, 2014
color
risris added this to Setting
May 2, 2014
absolutely beautiful
pachecoapm added this to pachecoapm's Ideas
April 6, 2014
Red twig dogwood
ckessler08 added this to Dry Creek Bed/Rain Garden
October 22, 2013
redtwig dogwood good in wet areas. Green bush in warm weather, red twigs in winter.
mkmhing added this to gardening
April 17, 2013
Colorful in all seasons
simonmel added this to shrubs
February 2, 2013
Dogwood!!
akrportland added this to Garden 2013
February 1, 2013
redtwig dogwoods
cjoman added this to cjoman's ideas
January 22, 2013
Botanical name: Cornus sericea (syn. Cornus stolonifera) Common names: Redtwig dogwood, red osier dogwood, American dogwood, red willow, redstem dogwood, redosier dogwood, creek dogwood USDA zones: 2-7 Water requirement: Moderate Sun requirement: Full sun to shade Mature size: 7-9’ tall, spreads to 12’ wide Tolerances: Deer, soil — including wet soil and clay soil Environmental benefits: Fruit attracts birds and wildlife; flowers attract butterflies
stcroixvalleylandscaping added this to stcroixvalleylandscaping's ideas
December 8, 2012
Redtwig dogwood
andrea lynn interiors added this to new renovation on existing farm house
November 25, 2012
redtwig dogwood
sabineh added this to plants
November 17, 2012
Redtwig dogwood
sleclair added this to exterior ideas
November 16, 2012
where to plant redtwig dogwood
bekytrail added this to bekytrail's ideas
April 21, 2012
redtwig dogwood winter color
esherpa added this to esherpa's ideas
March 7, 2012
How to use it. Consider adding a rain garden to your landscape to curb stormwater runoff. Found naturally in damp areas, redtwig dogwood is inherently suited wet conditions. During a time of year that most plants are on hiatus, redtwig dogwood is at the peak of its visual interest. A quick spreader and soil stabilizer, redtwig dogwood makes a great hillside or bank space filler. Plant in mass for a lush green screen in spring and summer and a fiery red landscape accent in fall and winter.
buhlke added this to buhlke's ideas
February 8, 2012
Live
emptypocketscarl added this to emptypocketscarl's Favorites
January 24, 2012
Winter plant idea
gerberagirl added this to gerberagirl's ideas
January 11, 2012
would love to paint this. beautiful landscape
Shelley Hugh-Jones added this to shj12's ideas
January 11, 2012
dogwood
lamarti added this to Outdoor areas
January 11, 2012
How to use it. Consider adding a rain garden to your landscape to curb stormwater runoff. Found naturally in damp areas, redtwig dogwood is inherently suited wet conditions.
fayemortenson added this to fayemortenson's ideas
January 11, 2012
ahh, the soggy places around the house
mljcje added this to mljcje's Favorites
January 11, 2012
Redtwig dogwood
Janet Broaddus added this to Faux Fireplace
January 9, 2012
Our own wetlands
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