Sandywoods Farm landscape
 

Sandywoods Farm

Photo: Rupert Whiteley
URL
http://www.unionstudioarch.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

"The community has been way more active than expected from the get-go," says principle architect Douglas Kallfelz. "They really found the right mix of people and resulting energy to make this a vibrant and active place."
Lucy Worsley added this to Back to the Future of the House
Perhaps most controversially, we also need to think again about what makes a community. Today’s builders and town planners believe that people don’t just live in houses, they inhabit “places.” Medieval towns were perfect examples of what planners seek: densely populated, walkable communities in which people ate local, seasonal food, and rich and poor lived in close proximity.A successful “place” mixes the different groups in society. In this sense, a great Elizabethan mansion like Hardwick Hall was successful social housing: Bess of Hardwick, its chatelaine, slept within meters of the dozens of people in her employment. It was a life of huge inequality, but Bess had personal responsibility for the poor and the sick, and they all belonged to a common endeavor.This sounds conservative, but it’s radically so. Today we live lives of vastly varying levels of luxury, unaware of those with alternative experiences. We’ve spent too long inside our own snug homes, looking smugly out the window at the world. The dwindling of the natural resources that have fueled our way of life since the 18th century will force us to change. But I don’t think that change need frighten us. Throughout history, people have thought their own age wildly novel, deeply violent and sinking into the utmost depravity. However, it’s comforting to think that the pleasures of domesticity are perennial. As Samuel Johnson put it, “To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition.”

What Houzzers are commenting on:

Many people today lack the satisfaction that comes from being part of a community. That issue has fueled a concept that has spread to neighborhoods around the globe: communities born from the basic principle that life is lived better together than apart. The Danish concept of bofællesskab, or “living community,” was imported to North America in the early 1980s by architects Kathryn McCamant and Charles Durrett, and dubbed “cohousing.” Today this approach continues to inspire collectives in which all members are active participants in defining their way of life. Residents rely on one another for social opportunities, shared meals, childcare and a sense of togetherness. When a cohousing group forms, the members usually define a set of standards and goals for the community before any architectural design work begins.
saundralee added this to LiveWell
August 23, 2013
community for artists / live in tenant resident farmer
lindaraeclark added this to design principles
June 5, 2013
Perhaps most controversially, we also need to think again about what makes a community. Today’s builders and town planners believe that people don’t just live in houses, they inhabit "places." Medieval towns were perfect examples of what planners seek: densely populated, walkable communities in which people ate local, seasonal food, and rich and poor lived in close proximity. A successful "place" mixes the different groups in society. In this sense, a great Elizabethan mansion like Hardwick Hall was successful social housing: Bess of Hardwick, its chatelaine, slept within meters of the dozens of people in her employment. It was a life of huge inequality, but Bess had personal responsibility for the poor and the sick, and they all belonged to a common endeavor. This sounds conservative, but it’s radically so. Today we live lives of vastly varying levels of luxury, unaware of those with alternative experiences. We’ve spent too long inside our own snug homes, looking smugly out the window at the world. The dwindling of the natural resources that have fueled our way of life since the 18th century will force us to change. But I don’t think that change need frighten us. Throughout history, people have thought their own age wildly novel, deeply violent and sinking into the utmost depravity. However, it’s comforting to think that the pleasures of domesticity are perennial. As Samuel Johnson put it, "To be happy at home is the ultimate result of all ambition."
queenanneslace added this to COMMUNITY IDEAS !!!
September 23, 2012
COMMUNITY FIRE PIT !!!
trowel_ca added this to trowel_ca garden
July 23, 2012
sandywoods Farm housing project, Tiverton Rhode Island
tjzupp added this to tjzupp's Favorites
March 6, 2012
cool rock
jmjwinter1 added this to decor ideas
January 31, 2012
LOVE this Bon Fire Pit. Bigger rocks surround the pit, add chairs and benches around it
twodahn added this to what home is
January 30, 2012
캠프파이어
corinnemarie added this to Curb Appeal
January 29, 2012
Tiverton, RI!
sulldog added this to firepits
January 29, 2012
like the rocks that would keep kids back
vickiafrost added this to vickiafrost's ideas
January 27, 2012
tiverton rhode island community
skhelzer added this to skhelzer's ideas
January 27, 2012
I am ready for this!
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