Sophora secundiflora
 

Sophora secundiflora

Photo: Wikimedia Commons user Stan Shebs, licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic
URL
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sophora_secundiflora_beans.jpg

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Annie Thornton added this to Great Design Plant: Texas Mountain Laurel
Distinguishing traits. A desert native, Texas mountain laurel possesses survival traits necessary to thrive in an arid climate while exuding characteristics of plants from much more temperate regions. Naturally spreading and shrubby, it can also be trained as a multistemmed upright tree. Dark green compound leaves cover its branches year-round, but its early spring blooms make Texas mountain laurel shine. Reminiscent of wisteria flowers, drooping clusters of violet-blue buds abound in midwinter. The flowers have been described as smelling like grape Kool-Aid or other artificial grape products. A relatively short bloom time leads to summer seed pods. If possible, remove the seed pods before they open in order to prevent the poisonous seeds from dropping. Photo by Stan Shebs via Wikimedia Commons

What Houzzers are commenting on:

Mindy Bates added this to yard
September 13, 2013
Planting notes. Texas mountain laurel thrives in heat, owing to its native climate, yet is hardy to temperatures reaching 10 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Plant in well-drained soil and give it deep monthly waterings during especially warm months. Texas mountain laurel is relatively slow growing, causing it to be a pricier specimen tree. If you train it as a tree, thin it during the growing season to prevent wind damage. More great design trees: Bald Cypress | Chinese Witch Hazel | Japanese Maple | Manzanita | Persian Ironwood Smoke Tree | Tree Aloe Great design flowers: Catmint | Golden Creeping Jenny | Pacific Coast Iris | Plumbago Red Kangaroo Paw | Sally Holmes Rose | Slipper Plant | Snake Flower Great design grasses: Black Mondo Grass | Cape Rush | Feather Reed Grass | New Zealand Wind Grass Great design plants: Blue Chalk Sticks | Hens-and-Chicks | Redtwig Dogwood | Toyon
abmw added this to abmw's ideas
May 12, 2013
Texas Mountain Laurel
livzhou added this to lanscape and flora
April 10, 2013
Distinguishing traits. A desert native, Texas mountain laurel possesses survival traits necessary to thrive in an arid climate while exuding characteristics of plants from much more temperate regions. Naturally spreading and shrubby, it can also be trained as a multistemmed upright tree. Dark green compound leaves cover its branches year-round, but its early spring blooms make Texas mountain laurel shine. Reminiscent of wisteria flowers, drooping clusters of violet-blue buds abound in midwinter. The flowers have been described as smelling like grape Kool-Aid or other artificial grape products. A relatively short bloom time leads to summer seed pods. If possible, remove the seed pods before they open in order to prevent the poisonous seeds from dropping.
craw8400 added this to craw8400's Ideas
January 18, 2013
Texas mountain laurel
dksuttle added this to Landscape
September 12, 2012
Distinguishing traits. A desert native, Texas mountain laurel possesses survival traits necessary to thrive in an arid climate while exuding characteristics of plants from much more temperate regions. Naturally spreading and shrubby, it can also be trained as a multistemmed upright tree. Dark green compound leaves cover its branches year-round, but its early spring blooms make Texas mountain laurel shine. Reminiscent of wisteria flowers, drooping clusters of violet-blue buds abound in midwinter. The flowers have been described as smelling like grape Kool-Aid or other artificial grape products. A relatively short bloom time leads to summer seed pods. If possible, remove the seed pods before they open in order to prevent the poisonous seeds from dropping.
wildta added this to B - Landscape
August 13, 2012
Sophora Secundiflora - I like if it comes in purples/pinks
Angela Isaza - Art added this to plants
May 1, 2012
Add to Ideabookby Bryan - oz4caster by Bryan - oz4caster Botanical name: Sophora secundiflora Common names: Texas mountain laurel, mescal bean, mountain laurel, mescal bean sophora, frijolillo, frijolito
judith195 added this to Judith195s Garden Ideas
March 18, 2012
Reminiscent of wisteria flowers, drooping clusters of violet-blue buds abound in midwinter. The flowers have been described as smelling like grape Kool-Aid or other artificial grape products. A relatively short bloom time leads to summer seed pods. If possible, remove the seed pods before they open in order to prevent the poisonous seeds from dropping
johnsjohn added this to johnsjohn's ideas
March 2, 2012
Sophora secundiflora
momizbest added this to Garden Ideas
February 29, 2012
same
goodwitch added this to Goodwitch's Garden
February 29, 2012
Texas Mountain Laurel
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™