Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens
Landscape Architects & Landscape Designers
The Many Reasons Not to "Clean Up" Your Garden
 

The Many Reasons Not to "Clean Up" Your Garden

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to 7 Reasons Not to ‘Clean Up’ Your Fall Garden
"Winter interest" is a landscape term that means there's something beautiful to look at during the cold season. Usually, that means grasses or redtwig dogwoods, but any old perennial will do — like the ones shown here. Winter interest isn't just for us, though; it's for birds, butterflies, frogs and soil microbes munching on leaves and making the garden healthier for summer. A lot will be going on if you leave the garden up until a spring cut-down — get out there and enjoy it this winter!Tell us: How do you help natural processes in your garden all year long? What gives you the greatest winter interest?
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to Lessons in the Rewards of Selfless Gardening
Celebrate winter. Life goes by too fast — the moment is gone as soon as we live it. Embrace the now. Embrace the winter garden. Leave those plants up, not only because you’re tired or like the look of them, but because they help overwintering wildlife like butterflies and caterpillars and frogs and bees, which all need the protective cover. Plus, the tall stems of spent plants gather more snow to hydrate the soil and protect plants from cold temps. It’s not your garden, it’s the garden’s garden, right?
Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to 4 Elements of a Stunning Fall Garden
Ongoing InterestOnce the fall color show is over, texture and structure don’t end. Not by a long shot. Perennials, grasses and shrubs still have so much to offer — especially with ornamental seed heads. Wild senna (Senna hebecarpa), coneflowers (Echinacea spp), bush clover (Lespedeza spp), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum) and Baptisia are some flowering perennials whose seed heads are outstanding design elements in a fall and winter garden. What’s more, once the snow starts flying, you’ll be glad you left the garden up — it’s gorgeous. Of course, lots of wildlife will also thank you, from bees to butterflies to frogs, who all overwinter in hollow stems and under leaves.More reasons not to clean up the fall garden
“And did you know that a snowflake is a fractal — a mathematical equation — just like coastlines, mountain ranges, trees, sunflowers and even the human circulatory system? Everything in nature can be mapped out with math, and nowhere is that more obvious than with a winter frost. Take your kids outside and expose them to a healthy double groan — math and nature.” — Benjamin VogtIf cleaning up the garden before the winter is your least-favorite gardening task, check out Vogt’s ideabook. Leaving things alone can add a whole new story to the garden in the winter, one that includes critters and fractals that dormant plants support. Full story: 7 Reasons Not to ‘Clean Up’ Your Fall Garden

What Houzzers are commenting on:

katwellen added this to Landscaping
October 23, 2014
"Winter interest" is a landscape term that means there's something beautiful to look at during the cold season. Usually, that means grasses or redtwig dogwoods, but any old perennial will do — like the ones shown here. Winter interest isn't just for us, though; it's for birds, butterflies, frogs and soil microbes munching on leaves and making the garden healthier for summer. A lot will be going on if you leave the garden up until a spring cut-down — get out there and enjoy it this winter!
Jennifer Sherman added this to jennifer_sherman2894543's ideas
October 18, 2014
This is great info. for birds & gardening!
Lynn Anne Miller added this to Leadchick's Ideas
October 1, 2014
I like the concept of "Winter Interest" and I also like leaving the garden in it's all natural state
Susan Gunn added this to garden
August 19, 2014
ornamental seed heads. Wild senna (Senna hebecarpa), coneflowers (Echinacea spp), bush clover (Lespedeza spp), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum) and Baptisia are some flowering perennials whose seed heads are outstanding design elements in a fall and winter garden.
katedennis added this to landscaping 3
August 18, 2014
Ongoing Interest Once the fall color show is over, texture and structure don’t end. Not by a long shot. Perennials, grasses and shrubs still have so much to offer — especially with ornamental seed heads. Wild senna (Senna hebecarpa), coneflowers (Echinacea spp), bush clover (Lespedeza spp), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum) and Baptisia are some flowering perennials whose seed heads are outstanding design elements in a fall and winter garden. What’s more, once the snow starts flying, you’ll be glad you left the garden up — it’s gorgeous. Of course, lots of wildlife will also thank you, from bees to butterflies to frogs, who all overwinter in hollow stems and under leaves.
Karen Anderson added this to Landscape Ideas
August 17, 2014
Once the fall color show is over, texture and structure don’t end. Not by a long shot. Perennials, grasses and shrubs still have so much to offer — especially with ornamental seed heads. Wild senna (Senna hebecarpa), coneflowers (Echinacea spp), bush clover (Lespedeza spp), Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium purpureum) and Baptisia are some flowering perennials whose seed heads are outstanding design elements in a fall and winter garden. What’s more, once the snow starts flying, you’ll be glad you left the garden up — it’s gorgeous. Of course, lots of wildlife will also thank you, from bees to butterflies to frogs, who all overwinter in hollow stems and under leaves.
caroljoannegray added this to caroljoannegray's Ideas
October 18, 2013
winter
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