Le jardinet
Landscape Architects & Designers
Denver Botanic Garden landscape
 

Denver Botanic Garden

Prickly pear cactus and soft Mexican feather grass at Denver Botanic Garden
Le jardinet
URL
http://www.lejardinetdesigns.com

What Houzz contributors are saying:

4. Use grasses for texture. The term “texture” in gardening refers to how a plant feels as well as how imposing a leaf is. For example, a plant may feel soft or spiky, smooth or rough. It may also be described as having a bold texture — that is, a big leaf surface, such as a hosta has — or at the opposite end of the scale, a fine, wispy texture, such as Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima, shown) has.Garden design relies on a pleasing balance of textures, and this photograph shows the two extremes with a bold prickly pear (Opuntia compressa) armored with wicked spines surrounded by the supersoft grasses.Tip: This combination won’t work for everybody. Mexican feather grass is invasive in many states, and prickly pear cactus, although hardy in USDA zones 4 to 9, needs a dry climate. You could get a similar effect by combining the soft coffee sedge (Carex tenuiculmus ‘Cappucino’) with the ghostly white canes of the ghost bramble (Rubus cockburnianus ‘Aureus’).More: 10 Ingredients of a Beautiful Winter Garden

What Houzzers are commenting on:

margielynnj added this to margielynnj's Ideas
August 14, 2014
Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima, shown)
Sead Idrizi added this to sead_idrizi's ideas
April 23, 2014
kaktus
lindacoates added this to lindacoates's ideas
February 12, 2014
Garden - Mexican feather grass and prickly pear cactus
Seasons Garden Design LLC added this to Winter Garden
December 12, 2013
Cacti and grasses
katpur24 added this to landscapes
December 9, 2013
Use grasses for texture. The term “texture” in gardening refers to how a plant feels as well as how imposing a leaf is. For example, a plant may feel soft or spiky, smooth or rough. It may also be described as having a bold texture — that is, a big leaf surface, such as a hosta has — or at the opposite end of the scale, a fine, wispy texture, such as Mexican feather grass (Stipa tenuissima, shown) has. Garden design relies on a pleasing balance of textures, and this photograph shows the two extremes with a bold prickly pear (Opuntia compressa) armored with wicked spines surrounded by the supersoft grasses. Tip: This combination won’t work for everybody. Mexican feather grass is invasive in many states, and prickly pear cactus, although hardy in USDA zones 4 to 9, needs a dry climate. You could get a similar effect by combining the soft coffee sedge (Carex tenuiculmus ‘Cappucino’) with the ghostly white canes of the ghost bramble (Rubus cockburnianus ‘Aureus’).
7071 added this to Outsiders
December 9, 2013
Nopales and Tall Grass.
janicelaster532 added this to Landscape Ideas
December 8, 2013
prickly pear
janicelaster532 added this to Living Room Ideas
December 8, 2013
prickly pear
kwieting added this to Kurt's garden
December 8, 2013
Prickly pear hardy to zone 4 - but likes dry climate
astrea added this to astrea's Ideas
December 8, 2013
grasses
Kim Rieber added this to kim.rieber's ideas
December 5, 2013
the course texture of the cactus and the fine fluffy texture of the grass. Idea for Darlas front garden
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