Atlanta Botanical Gardens Spring 2012 Recipe landscape
 

Atlanta Botanical Gardens Spring 2012 Recipe

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Marianne Lipanovich added this to Cool-Season Vegetables: How to Grow Salad Greens
Harvest: It's best to harvest arugula 25 to 40 days after sowing seeds, before the leaves get too large and bitter. Remove the entire plant while the leaves are young. You can also harvest just the leaves from the center of the plant to encourage a second crop.Pull individual chicory leaves from the outside of the plant or pull up the entire plant. You can remove the outer leaves of endive and escarole for a continuous harvest or simply harvest the entire plant.Harvest radicchio when the heads are full. In warm-winter climates, cut 1 to 2 inches above the soil level; plants may regrow.Harvest mustard greens by cutting off the leaves and leaving the stems or by removing the outer leaves once they reach 6 to 8 inches long. You can also pull up the entire plant.“Cut and come again” harvest methods work well for arugula, endive, escarole and many mustard greens. Simply cut off the tops of all the leaves about an inch above the center and wait for more leaves to grow.How to grow more cool-season vegetables

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barbmarcell added this to GARDEN: Veggies to Plant in Late Summer
August 9, 2014
Planting and care: Sow arugula seeds 1/2 inch deep and 2 inches apart or scatter them over a garden bed. Add a complete fertilizer at planting time. Once the seedlings have developed at least four leaves, thin to 6 inches apart. (You can eat the thinnings.) Keep the soil moist and free of weeds. Arugula reseeds freely and is fairly resistant to pests. Sow leaf chicory about 1/4 inch deep and 2 inches apart; thin to 6 to 8 inches apart. You can also scatter seeds over a garden bed. Cover with a fine layer of soil and keep moist until seedlings form. Continue to supply regular water and keep the bed weed free. Pests include slugs and snails, aphids, cabbage loopers, cutworms, flea beetles, leafhoppers and leaf miners; downy mildew and fusarium wilt are possible diseases. Sow endive and escarole as you would leaf lettuce or leaf chicory. Thin to 1/2 to 1 foot apart. They will last into warm weather but may become even more bitter. Blanch them for two to three weeks by tying the outer leaves around the center. Don’t let the leaves get wet during this period. Radicchio is best started in mid or late summer. Thin from 8 inches to 1 foot apart. Heads will begin to form as the plants reach maturity; if they don’t, harvest the leaves and see if a head will form. Mustard greens like fertile and well-drained soil, and do best if you don’t plant them where cabbage crops have grown. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep and 1 to 2 inches apart. Keep the soil most, and when the plants reach between 4 and 5 inches high, thin them to 4 to 6 inches apart. (You can eat the thinnings.) Leave more space if you want to grow plants to their mature size before harvesting. Keep the soil moist and weed regularly. The only pest problems may be aphids, cabbage loopers and flea beetles. Downy mildew might also be a problem. Sow arugula, baby mustards, escarole and endive every two weeks to ensure a continual crop until weather causes the plant to bolt or die back. SaveEmail Harvest: It's best to harvest arugula 25 to 40 days after sowing seeds, before the leaves get too large and bitter. Remove the entire plant while the leaves are young. You can also harvest just the leaves from the center of the plant to encourage a second crop. Pull individual chicory leaves from the outside of the plant or pull up the entire plant. You can remove the outer leaves of endive and escarole for a continuous harvest or simply harvest the entire plant. Harvest radicchio when the heads are full. In warm-winter climates, cut 1 to 2 inches above the soil level; plants may regrow. Harvest mustard greens by cutting off the leaves and leaving the stems or by removing the outer leaves once they reach 6 to 8 inches long. You can also pull up the entire plant. “Cut and come again” harvest methods work well for arugula, endive, escarole and many mustard greens. Simply cut off the tops of all the leaves about an inch above the center and wait for more leaves to grow.
Yesel Hyatt added this to Media Room
March 27, 2014
Harvest: It's best to harvest arugula 25 to 40 days after sowing seeds, before the leaves get too large and bitter. Remove the entire plant while the leaves are young. You can also harvest just the leaves from the center of the plant to encourage a second crop. Pull individual chicory leaves from the outside of the plant or pull up the entire plant. You can remove the outer leaves of endive and escarole for a continuous harvest or simply harvest the entire plant. Harvest radicchio when the heads are full. In warm-winter climates, cut 1 to 2 inches above the soil level; plants may regrow. Harvest mustard greens by cutting off the leaves and leaving the stems or by removing the outer leaves once they reach 6 to 8 inches long. You can also pull up the entire plant. “Cut and come again” harvest methods work well for arugula, endive, escarole and many mustard greens. Simply cut off the tops of all the leaves about an inch above the center and wait for more leaves to grow.
cjerger added this to garden
February 19, 2014
arugula
lyvigil added this to how to
September 9, 2012
Harvest: It's best to harvest arugula 25 to 40 days after sowing seeds, before the leaves get too large and bitter. Remove the entire plant while the leaves are young. You can also harvest just the leaves from the center of the plant to encourage a second crop. Pull individual chicory leaves from the outside of the plant or pull up the entire plant. You can remove the outer leaves of endive and escarole for a continuous harvest or simply harvest the entire plant. Harvest radicchio when the heads are full. In warm-winter climates, cut 1 to 2 inches above the soil level; plants may regrow. Harvest mustard greens by cutting off the leaves and leaving the stems or by removing the outer leaves once they reach 6 to 8 inches long. You can also pull up the entire plant. “Cut and come again” harvest methods work well for arugula, endive, escarole and many mustard greens. Simply cut off the tops of all the leaves about an inch above the center and wait for more leaves to grow.
Carol's Curb Appeal added this to jillofalltrade's ideas
September 9, 2012
Eat local
lindaraeclark added this to lindaraeclark's ideas
September 9, 2012
Harvest: It's best to harvest arugula 25 to 40 days after sowing seeds, before the leaves get too large and bitter. Remove the entire plant while the leaves are young. You can also harvest just the leaves from the center of the plant to encourage a second crop. Pull individual chicory leaves from the outside of the plant or pull up the entire plant. You can remove the outer leaves of endive and escarole for a continuous harvest or simply harvest the entire plant. Harvest radicchio when the heads are full. In warm-winter climates, cut 1 to 2 inches above the soil level; plants may regrow. Harvest mustard greens by cutting off the leaves and leaving the stems or by removing the outer leaves once they reach 6 to 8 inches long. You can also pull up the entire plant. “Cut and come again” harvest methods work well for arugula, endive, escarole and many mustard greens. Simply cut off the tops of all the leaves about an inch above the center and wait for more leaves to grow.
lsemartha added this to yard
March 25, 2012
mustard greens recipe
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