Lost Art Salon
Artists and Artisans
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January 17, 2014
ericcamaas wrote:
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Lost Art Salon
This is an oil by Alysanne McGaffey available for sale within the Lost Art Collection #13269/16384- Alysanne McGaffey, 1982, Oil on Canvas, Entitled "Persephone", 50.5"x40.5" framed, $2,895 (http://lostartsalon.com/mcgaffey2.html). All of the works displayed in this photograph are by Bay Area Figurative artist Alysanne McGaffey. See her bio on our website.
0 Likes   January 19, 2014 at 11:28AM
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As for works on paper, you need to determine first if it is a water-based paint or not. That could be done by wiping a damp white cloth in an area of the piece that would be behind a mat. If the color of the paint can be seen on the cloth, it is a water-based paint. For water-based paint, one would damage the piece while trying to clean using water. We recommend to simply dust using a dry soft and fine brush. If you notice a small stain that bothers your eye, you can try to gently wipe out using a damp, barely humid white cotton cloth, avoiding taking off the pigments. With non-water-based paint, a soft cleaning with a damp, barely humid white cotton cloth can do wonders. Avoid wetting the exposed paper without paint, as you could create a water stain. With works on paper with lots of water stains, it is better to leave it alone or see an art restorer specializing in works on paper. They would be able to give you an estimate on the cost for restoring your works on paper. Most of the time, a work on paper looks very grimy because of the accumulation of dirt on the glass itself, which could easily be cleaned up and the piece put back together. You might decide to further protect the piece by changing the mat to an acid-free mat.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

christietoo added this to LAKE HOUSE IDEAS
October 4, 2014
ART RESTORATION As for works on paper, you need to determine first if it is a water-based paint or not. That could be done by wiping a damp white cloth in an area of the piece that would be behind a mat. If the color of the paint can be seen on the cloth, it is a water-based paint. For water-based paint, one would damage the piece while trying to clean using water. We recommend to simply dust using a dry soft and fine brush. If you notice a small stain that bothers your eye, you can try to gently wipe out using a damp, barely humid white cotton cloth, avoiding taking off the pigments. With non-water-based paint, a soft cleaning with a damp, barely humid white cotton cloth can do wonders. Avoid wetting the exposed paper without paint, as you could create a water stain. With works on paper with lots of water stains, it is better to leave it alone or see an art restorer specializing in works on paper. They would be able to give you an estimate on the cost for restoring your works on paper. Most of the time, a work on paper looks very grimy because of the accumulation of dirt on the glass itself, which could easily be cleaned up and the piece put back together. You might decide to further protect the piece by changing the mat to an acid-free mat.
protem added this to new home art and lighting ideas
September 23, 2014
To tighten an old canvas painting -- spray the back with water and let it dry in the sun.
phyllisu added this to phyllisu's ideas
January 22, 2014
painting on the right. Yoga pose undercolor
rebsnolan7 added this to 107 Manor Place
January 19, 2014
art protection and storage
fengshuigal added this to How To 2014
January 19, 2014
Q. Let’s say I’ve found a vintage painting I love, but it looks really grimy. Is there anything an average person can do to safely clean a painting? A. The simplest way to clean up an oil or acrylic painting on canvas is to use a white cotton cloth soaked in a gentle soapy water; olive oil–based soap works wonders. You’ll be surprised to see how much grime comes off. Be gentle with paintings with thick impasto, as you do not want to break hardened paint. You might want to use Q-tips and work gently in crevasses. If the painting still looks grimy, it’s better to see an art restorer that would use a stronger art cleaning product and may reapply pigment colors where need be. It’s surprising how a restored painting can show its true colors just by taking away the accumulation of cigarette or fireplace smoke. If your oil painting shows paint flaking off, it is better to leave the cleaning and restoration to an art restorer. Many times canvases have become loosened on the stretcher bars. A simple method to retighten the canvas is to spray water on the back of the canvas and leave the piece to dry in the sun for a couple of hours. Canvases are made of fabric, and with time the weave has become loose. This process is safe and will not damage the painting itself.
Interiors of Houston added this to skernan's ideas
January 19, 2014
info on paintings
Margarita De la Peña added this to webuser_1178861's ideas
January 19, 2014
Interesting article about conservation, maintenance, storage and transportation of art pieces. http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/22143598?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u425&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery19
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