Becky Dietrich, Interior Designer
Interior Designers & Decorators
downsizing #2  It takes careful planning
 

downsizing #2 It takes careful planning

What Houzz contributors are saying:

Becky Dietrich, Interior Designer added this to Downsizing Help: Choosing What Furniture to Leave Behind
Measure, measure, measure. I cannot overstate the importance of this step. Even if your homeowner’s association, real estate agent or landlord supplies you with a floor plan, measure anyway! Those plans are almost never correct, and even a few inches can make a huge difference in a small space. Get permission from the powers that be to spend an hour or so measuring your new home. It’s wise to measure all the rooms — but especially the major living spaces. I use a 25-foot tape measure rather than a 12-foot one, because it makes the job so much easier. Start with the basic room length, width and ceiling height, then measure the doors and windows, and finally add details like air conditioners, heating vents and electrical outlets. I use quarter-inch-scale graph paper and draw the rooms more or less to scale, but that is not necessary. Shown here are the scribbled measurements from our new living room and minuscule dining room. Notice that I circled each dimension for clarity (allowance for my aging brain), and made little notes to myself about the space.
“Editing your stuff can be a challenge. Don’t panic. Chances are, what you have is way more than what you want, and after a year in your downsized house, you will have happily forgotten about the things you left behind.” — Becky DietrichAt first the thought of downsizing can be overwhelming, but Dietrich’s article will calm you down and help you do it. Plus, I love a design drawing with a big fat “OMG!” on it. Full story: Downsizing Help: Choosing What Furniture to Leave Behind

What Houzzers are commenting on:

isidora123 added this to Gunners Rise
March 11, 2014
How to draft a room layout
betsyc28 added this to renovations
January 29, 2014
look at the scale. small but cozy and doable. living room 12.8 x 16 dining too small
avinashkhairnar added this to Rough Plan
January 19, 2014
gfhgffg
ECustomFinishes added this to What To Consider Before Meeting An Architect
January 14, 2014
Refine with graph paper – To refine your initial design concept, try putting your ideas to scale on graph paper. Some general rules for dimensions are as follows: general seating, like a dining chair, is 24” wide x 24” per person. See this useful dining seating guide for more: http://www.ecustomfinishes.com/table-seating-guide/ At least 2.5’-3' is recommended for walking. Try using 7 'x 7' for bed, as this will cover major sizes. With these dimensions in mind, you can design your own furniture and passage areas which will approximately tell you how much each space should be.
fengshuigal added this to How to
January 5, 2014
Measure, measure, measure. I cannot overstate the importance of this step. Even if your homeowner’s association, real estate agent or landlord supplies you with a floor plan, measure anyway! Those plans are almost never correct, and even a few inches can make a huge difference in a small space. Get permission from the powers that be to spend an hour or so measuring your new home. It’s wise to measure all the rooms — but especially the major living spaces. I use a 25-foot tape measure rather than a 12-foot one, because it makes the job so much easier. Start with the basic room length, width and ceiling height, then measure the doors and windows, and finally add details like air conditioners, heating vents and electrical outlets. I use quarter-inch-scale graph paper and draw the rooms more or less to scale, but that is not necessary. Shown here are the scribbled measurements from our new living room and minuscule dining room. Notice that I circled each dimension for clarity (allowance for my aging brain), and made little notes to myself about the space.
scarfed added this to scarfed's Ideas
January 5, 2014
Whole article will be important in the future.
chingy9 added this to chingy9's Ideas
January 5, 2014
Good tip
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