Shades Of Green Landscape Architecture
Landscape Architects & Designers
Leed Platinum by the Bay modern-landscape
 

Leed Platinum by the Bay

A certified LEED-H Platinum building by Butler Armsden Architects, the Tiburon Bay House features an innovative and sustainable landscape. Native lawn, permeable surfaces, and a gray water system were all integrated into the landscape design. Great care was taken to reuse existing materials and drought tolerant plants. Existing concrete was transformed into a new patio; no-mow lawn was used as a low-maintenance grass solution; and gabion walls were built from recycled materials.
URL
http://www.shadesofgreenla.com

This photo has 2 questions

grewa002 wrote:
What kind of grass is this? - How frequently does it need watering in a dry area?
   Comment   March 7, 2014
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PRO
Shades Of Green Landscape Architecture
it takes about half the water of regular lawn
April 17, 2014 at 1:12pm   
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nking43
Is this the NoMow grass from Prairie Nursery? Would you rcommend it?
April 17, 2014 at 5:03pm   
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Urban Oasis wrote:
What kind of fescue did you use?
     Comment   September 3, 2013
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PRO
Shades Of Green Landscape Architecture
its a native bentgrass sod
June 11, 2014 at 2:11pm   
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PRO
Urban Oasis
Thanks. I was wondering if it was bentgrass or red fescue.
June 11, 2014 at 3:02pm   
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What Houzz contributors are saying:

Benjamin Vogt / Monarch Gardens added this to 7 Ecofriendly Gardening Ideas That Also Cut Chore Time
Rethink the Lawn7. Mow less and ditch the chemicals. Fire your lawnmower, landscape service or pool service. Loud lawn-care equipment contributes to hearing loss, restricts blood flow (which can lead to hypertension), pollutes the air at many times the rate of driving a car, and leads to millions of spilled gallons of gasoline each year — not to mention the 23 million tons of lawn clippings that go into landfills that could be turned into compost. Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days).Chemical fertilizers and pesticides are toxic to wildlife, pets, kids and adults, and may lead to autoimmune diseases, birth defects and learning disabilities. Avoid them. Time saved: 1 hour
J. Peterson Garden Design added this to How to Plant a New Lawn From Seed
Why start a lawn from seed?You want to save money. (Grass seed typically costs 2 to 8 cents per square foot, depending upon variety and spread rate. Compare that to 8 to 30 cents per square foot for sod.)You like a type of grass that grows better from seed (such as cool-season grasses like Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass and tall and fine fescues)You can start your lawn in the spring or fall.You want to plant your lawn yourself.You need to fill in a small area of your lawn that has declined.
2. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
Falon Land Studio LLC added this to How to Switch to an Organic Landscape Plan
Lawn aeration and thatch. You may need to aerate your lawn to allow for some oxygen to reach the upper crust of soil. This will improve the soil tilth under your sod and is usually necessary if you have been using synthetic chemicals and fertilizers for several years. One way to evaluate if your lawn and the soil below are acting as a healthy ecosystem is by looking at the amount of thatch collected under the grass blades. Thatch is the dead, brown grass blades that are meant to break down into the soil. There should be some thatch in your lawn, but not a buildup of more than 2 inches. A buildup means that your grass is not properly breaking down into the soil. Establish a healthy soil ecosystem and the thatch will begin to break down into the soil to feed your lawn.

What Houzzers are commenting on:

leo52 added this to landscaping
last Monday
dwarf fescue - texas bluegrass - canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant. warm season grasses buffalograss, blue grama grass are lowgrowing natives
marykoncak added this to no mow alternative lawn
July 6, 2014
dwarf tall fescue
amkirsch added this to Drought resistant gardens
July 6, 2014
Drought tolerant or native grasses: dwarf tall fescue, texas bluegrass.Canadian bluegrass. Native, low growing grasses: buffalo grass, blue gram grass
goodchick added this to hardscape & landscape
June 22, 2014
Leed Platinum by the Bay A certified LEED-H Platinum building by Butler Armsden Architects, the Tiburon Bay House features an innovative and sustainable landscape. Native lawn, permeable surfaces, and a gray water system were all integrated into the landscape design. Great care was taken to reuse existing materials and drought tolerant plants. Existing concrete was transformed into a new patio; no-mow lawn was used as a low-maintenance grass solution; and gabion walls were built from recycled materials. URL http://www.shadesofgreenla.com Shades Of Green Landscape Architecture its a native bentgrass sod
groseille added this to gardens
June 22, 2014
. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
jhjh17 added this to Dorado stone
June 11, 2014
Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications
vetriusha added this to garden
June 7, 2014
bluegrama grass
uffda1 added this to uffda1's Ideas
May 24, 2014
Grasses
Green Earth Gardens added this to Back Yard
May 21, 2014
no mow grass
annecolasanto added this to annecolasanto's ideas
May 19, 2014
Grass
earthjill added this to micah
May 18, 2014
drought tolerant grass
cr1116 added this to cr1116's ideas
May 16, 2014
Exterior
enya_34 added this to entry way
May 16, 2014
love that sun catcher for the entry way
pedropuente added this to pedropuente's Ideas
May 16, 2014
Grass
karenneuburger added this to karenneuburger's Ideas
May 15, 2014
Grass odeas
jardingarden added this to Exterior Ideas
May 14, 2014
wood, windows/doors
jardingarden added this to garden bed
May 14, 2014
beds and grasses
riverhouse62 added this to midcent62's ideas
May 14, 2014
natural grass, no mow.
brodygresko added this to brodygresko's ideas
May 14, 2014
Exterior
thiagohernandes added this to Paisagismo e Áreas Externas
May 14, 2014
capim
sari_mak added this to Refined Garden Ideas
May 11, 2014
NoMow grass for front yard
Rosie added this to Monet's Garden
April 30, 2014
Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
Chris Lee added this to shades of green stuff
April 29, 2014
no mow lawn
dallaswoof added this to Exterior
April 28, 2014
doors and windows
rydrenn added this to Landscape Ideas
April 27, 2014
Drought tolerant turf
cdfrizell added this to Landscape Ideas
April 27, 2014
types of drought tolerant grasses- dwarf tall fescue, texas bluegrass, canadian bluegrass- these are cool season grasses. Can be blended with kentucky bluegrass. warm season native grasses- buffalo and blue grama grass
leaff added this to xeriscape - hardscape
April 24, 2014
2. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
Chuck Hammack CAPS, CGP added this to Outdoor.ed
April 15, 2014
Practically turfed
dapppydog added this to Exterior Ideas
April 7, 2014
love this modern home. many pic's to see
Wai Yan added this to wai_yan's ideas
April 6, 2014
8
gnr72 added this to gnr72's Ideas
April 4, 2014
Grass
mzsadiea added this to Our Yard
March 23, 2014
Texas bluegrass, Canadian and Kentucky bluegrass.
Leslie Leonetti added this to gardening
March 19, 2014
grass
yuriehong added this to plants
March 18, 2014
2. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
debracb added this to debracb's Ideas
March 15, 2014
The grasses
chriscoddbrown added this to chriscoddbrown side acre
March 14, 2014
Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
shawndrawitte added this to Patio Ideas
March 12, 2014
Grass.
marinohio added this to Landscaping
March 12, 2014
http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/23941374?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u450&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery6 low maintenance
Susanne O'Trimble Landscape Design added this to K&C/P
March 10, 2014
no-mow lawn
fgedack added this to FranZ-DesignZ
March 10, 2014
Residential architecture
marykuduk added this to marykuduk's ideas
March 10, 2014
No lawn
kannazona added this to kannazona's ideas
March 10, 2014
Oxtails near glass enclosure
michael66 added this to michael66's ideas
March 10, 2014
the angle of the roof line..........
1alison added this to landscaping/outdoor design
March 10, 2014
no mow grass
lookylooky added this to Garden
March 10, 2014
Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought tolerant, cool-season grassed, often blended with Kentucky bluegrass.
Jun Josol added this to jun_josol's ideas
March 10, 2014
simple design
eimile added this to eimile's ideas
March 9, 2014
grass
st121 added this to Landscape Ideas
March 9, 2014
Longer grass lawn
nbehler added this to landscaping
March 9, 2014
Drought tolerant grass
Linda Cook added this to linda_cook's ideas
March 9, 2014
Love this grass
homeremodel2014 added this to Landscape Ideas
March 9, 2014
the modern look/architecture
ehbeery added this to ehbeery's ideas
March 9, 2014
house design and windows
lindafmg added this to Landscape
March 9, 2014
Xeriscape--2. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
twilson63 added this to twilson63's Ideas
March 9, 2014
small house
oldtownie1 added this to Exterior Ideas
March 9, 2014
like the entry treatment
maringirl40 added this to maringirl40's Ideas
March 9, 2014
Landscape non- lawn
tmrees added this to Landscape Ideas
March 9, 2014
I like the idea of mixing in native grasses that are drought tolerant.
tbennett4 added this to tbennett4's ideas
March 9, 2014
2. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
jobasca added this to Jobasca Garden Notes
March 9, 2014
Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
lcourtie added this to Landscape Ideas
March 9, 2014
Interesting grass
aleris added this to landscape
March 9, 2014
native grasses
frases added this to garden
March 9, 2014
Xeniscape design http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/23941374?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u450&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery6
Jody Wong added this to outdoors
March 9, 2014
Grass
tsuna added this to naturescape alternative to lawn
March 9, 2014
xeriscape turf grass-low maintenance and drought resistant variety
kafowler7067 added this to kafowler7067's ideas
March 9, 2014
the grass dwarf tall fescue, texas bluegrass canadian bluegrass drought tolerant for florida
hendev added this to hendev's Ideas
March 9, 2014
siding/upper windows
hikel added this to hikel's Ideas
March 9, 2014
Exterior
bellared15 added this to Outdoor Living
March 9, 2014
before xeroscape
Tricia Irish added this to Exteriors
March 9, 2014
Love the roof.
dmueller4 added this to outdoors
March 9, 2014
2. Create practical turf areas. Use lawn areas where they make sense, as play places or cooling elements for people and pets. Consider using drought-tolerant or native grasses. They will require less water and fertilizer, and can often be mowed less frequently. Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
sylvierobidoux added this to sylvierobidoux's Favorites
March 9, 2014
Extérieur arrière
gsx115 added this to backyard
March 9, 2014
Dwarf tall fescue, Texas bluegrass and Canadian bluegrass are drought-tolerant, cool-season grasses that stand up well to foot traffic (they are often blended with Kentucky bluegrass). Warm-season, native grasses like buffalo grass and blue grama grass are low-growing native grasses that adapt well to many residential applications.
michelleann1 added this to Outdoor Spaces
March 8, 2014
Grasses
jherman2600 added this to front yard
March 8, 2014
Native grass
billyhelms added this to billyhelms's Ideas
March 8, 2014
Selection of native grasses, Texas bluegrass
Crystal Danby added this to crystal_danby's ideas
March 8, 2014
simple
aniluap2 added this to Garden
March 7, 2014
Grass
Ashley Alexander added this to ashley_alexander5332518's Ideas
December 1, 2013
I love lush green grass. Especially soft.
creativegin added this to 4415
November 25, 2013
one day replace grey woodwith natural
juanitars324 added this to juanitars324's Ideas
November 20, 2013
A fresh new lawn
melindawilliams added this to melindawilliams's Ideas
November 20, 2013
Grass
wtheoallen added this to exterior
November 17, 2013
Roof line - windows
lydiargrimm added this to lydiargrimm's ideas
September 28, 2013
Everything
mamsa40 added this to Farm House
September 26, 2013
Grass
mossi79 added this to plants I love
September 12, 2013
The best lawn eva
eliser added this to backyards
September 10, 2013
Rethink the Lawn 7. Mow less and ditch the chemicals. Fire your lawnmower, landscape service or pool service. Loud lawn-care equipment contributes to hearing loss, restricts blood flow (which can lead to hypertension), pollutes the air at many times the rate of driving a car, and leads to millions of spilled gallons of gasoline each year — not to mention the 23 million tons of lawn clippings that go into landfills that could be turned into compost. Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days). Chemical fertilizers and pesticides are toxic to wildlife, pets, kids and adults, and may lead to autoimmune diseases, birth defects and learning disabilities. Avoid them.
Mary Herman added this to mary_herman's ideas
September 9, 2013
rethink lawn, let it go long
esilana added this to esilana's Ideas
September 8, 2013
Helpful garden article
smatula added this to smatula's ideas
September 6, 2013
Mow less and ditch the chemicals. Fire your lawnmower, landscape service or pool service. Loud lawn-care equipment contributes to hearing loss, restricts blood flow (which can lead to hypertension), pollutes the air at many times the rate of driving a car, and leads to millions of spilled gallons of gasoline each year — not to mention the 23 million tons of lawn clippings that go into landfills that could be turned into compost. Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days). Chemical fertilizers and pesticides are toxic to wildlife, pets, kids and adults, and may lead to autoimmune diseases, birth defects and learning disabilities. Avoid them.
katedennis added this to landscaping
September 5, 2013
Mow less and ditch the chemicals. Fire your lawnmower, landscape service or pool service. Loud lawn-care equipment contributes to hearing loss, restricts blood flow (which can lead to hypertension), pollutes the air at many times the rate of driving a car, and leads to millions of spilled gallons of gasoline each year — not to mention the 23 million tons of lawn clippings that go into landfills that could be turned into compost. Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days). Chemical fertilizers and pesticides are toxic to wildlife, pets, kids and adults, and may lead to autoimmune diseases, birth defects and learning disabilities. Avoid them.
4868 added this to Lawns
September 5, 2013
Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days).
lindaraeclark added this to remodel
September 5, 2013
Mow less and ditch the chemicals. Fire your lawnmower, landscape service or pool service. Loud lawn-care equipment contributes to hearing loss, restricts blood flow (which can lead to hypertension), pollutes the air at many times the rate of driving a car, and leads to millions of spilled gallons of gasoline each year — not to mention the 23 million tons of lawn clippings that go into landfills that could be turned into compost. Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days). Chemical fertilizers and pesticides are toxic to wildlife, pets, kids and adults, and may lead to autoimmune diseases, birth defects and learning disabilities. Avoid them.
kgo4it added this to Garden Inspiration
September 5, 2013
Rethink the Lawn Mow less and ditch the chemicals. Fire your lawnmower, landscape service or pool service. Loud lawn-care equipment contributes to hearing loss, restricts blood flow (which can lead to hypertension), pollutes the air at many times the rate of driving a car, and leads to millions of spilled gallons of gasoline each year — not to mention the 23 million tons of lawn clippings that go into landfills that could be turned into compost. Mow twice a month (less in the heat of summer) and let the grass grow a bit longer — if you do, the roots will grow deeper, and the height will shade the ground, increasing soil moisture. Consider lessening your impact by using an electric mower or even a reel mower (the latter has come a long way since the good old days).
bcuyler added this to 2017 vision
September 5, 2013
minimal look of the windows
thewebbs00 added this to thewebbs00's ideas
September 4, 2013
I like this addition
circularspace added this to landscape
September 4, 2013
the grass
tpointon added this to Exterior Ideas
September 4, 2013
Love the grass
jacboy added this to Backyard Ideas
September 4, 2013
long grass
Dave Hart added this to Maintenance
September 4, 2013
Alternative to turf.
reese18 added this to reese18's ideas
September 4, 2013
low mow grass
lindafritzknitz added this to No mow
July 29, 2013
No-mow grass
gamemom added this to front yard inspirations
March 20, 2013
No mow grass
jguslick22 added this to Landscaping
January 26, 2013
No mow lawn
evanreadmullins added this to evanreadmullins's ideas
September 10, 2012
No mow grass
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