26 squash Eclectic Home Design Photos

Home Farm and GardenFifth Season Landscape Design & Construction
The pests: Squash bugs (Anasa genus) and squash vine borers (Melittia cucurbitae) The victims: Squash, particularly butternut and summer squash; cantaloupe, watermelon The trap crop: More squash, especially blue hubbard (shown). Plant blue hubbard two weeks before planting your main crop to give the
Organic Matters: Thwart Insect Pests With Trap Crops The pests: Squash bugs (Anasa genus) and squash vine borers (Melittia cucurbitae) The victims: Squash, particularly butternut and summer squash; cantaloupe, watermelon The trap crop: More squash, especially blue hubbard (shown). Plant blue hubbard two weeks
Blue Hubbard Squash - kills cucumber beetles, squash borers & other pests
plant blue hubbard squash 2 weeks before planting other squash. It is a companion plant to keep bugs off!
Autumn PorchesJulie Ranee Photography
Harvest: Summer squash are usually ready to harvest about two months after planting. Crookneck and scallop varieties should be about 2 to 3 inches long, while zucchini and
gloves. Once the fruits start to mature, you’ll need to stay on top of harvesting; overnight that tiny zucchini can become a monster. Harvest winter squash once the vines have dried and the skin is hard enough that you can’t dent it with a fingernail. It can survive light frost but should be harvested
outside until the stems shrivel, then store in a dry basement or garage with a temperature of around 55 degrees Fahrenheit (12 degrees Celsius). Winter squash keeps for two to six months.
Harvest: Summer squash are usually ready to harvest about two months after planting. Crookneck and scallop varieties should be about 2 to 3 inches long, while zucchini and
Autumn PorchesJulie Ranee Photography
think outside of the typical fall decorating box? A. Go all natural for your seasonal decor. Use fall veggies to decorate your kitchen, like acorn squash and sweet potatoes in your favorite antique bowl. It's functional and fabulous. Q. What's your one big decorating "no" for fall? A. Fake! No fake
Pumpkins, squashes and gourds, oh my! Which will you pick to decorate your home?
to think outside of the typical fall decorating box?A. Go all natural for your seasonal decor. Use fall veggies to decorate your kitchen, like acorn squash and sweet potatoes in your favorite antique bowl. It's functional and fabulous. Q. What's your one big decorating "no" for fall? A. Fake! No fake pumpkins
IndustrialNanette Wong
It's a great idea for how to use a spare room. Don't need to squash everything into cupboards.
House for Two ArchitectsHouse + House Architects
squash yellow
Redwood Branch TrellisesSteve Masley Consulting and Design
"Chard, collards, cucumbers, eggplant, pumpkins, summer squash, tomatoes, tomatillos and endive will transplant well this month — look for healthy (free of pests and diseases) 4-inch pots at your local nursery
veggies and herbs in the ground for months of harvest," says landscape designer Jenny Peterson. "Chard, collards, cucumbers, eggplant, pumpkins, summer squash, tomatoes, tomatillos and endive will transplant well this month — look for healthy (free of pests and diseases) 4-inch pots at your local nursery
Plant vegetables and herbs. Get your veggies and herbs in the ground for months of harvest. Chard, collards, cucumbers, eggplant, pumpkins, summer squash, tomatoes, tomatillos and endive will transplant well this month — look for healthy (free of pests and diseases) 4-inch pots at your local nursery
Fall DecorAmy Renea
These late-summer crops pair nicely with early-fall purple mums and butternut squash. The purples are delicious against the creamy yellow.
These late-summer crops pair nicely with early-fall purple mums and butternut squash. The purples are delicious against the creamy yellow.
butternut squash
Entertaining SpaceSusan Cohan, APLD
previous espalier. A trellis like this will work equally well to support berries or beans. If it's sturdy enough, consider using it to encourage smaller squashes, cucumbers and eggplants to grow up rather than sprawl outward. You'll protect the crop from insects in the soil, not to mention marauding pets and
previous espalier. A trellis like this will work equally well to support berries or beans. If it's sturdy enough, consider using it to encourage smaller squashes, cucumbers and eggplants to grow up rather than sprawl outward. You'll protect the crop from insects in the soil, not to mention marauding pets and
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