240 Irons

While we all may dread the task of ironing out our clothes and table linens, the thought of an unsightly wrinkled napkin or tablecloth gracing a formal table setting is unsettling. Irons have come a long way in recent years by not only looking better than they did before, but also performing higher as well. This is an appliance that almost everyone will need to purchase at least once in a lifetime, but with the proper care and a little bit of an investment, you should be content to iron away with the same steamer for many years to come, so let’s just get this going. More 
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What types are irons are there?


Steam Irons: Steam irons are what you would expect a typical residential iron to look like. Recent technological advancements have made features that were once reserved for super high end and expensive models standard and readily available. A great advancement in steam iron technology is that tap water can now be used to fill the steam reservoir.
Steam Ironing Systems: Usually more expensive as well as larger than standard steam irons, steam ironing systems are for those who are serious about removing wrinkles from heavy duty materials. If time and time again your personal steam iron isn’t getting the wrinkles out, you may want to consider upgrading.
Cordless Irons: Like traditional steam irons in all respects except for the cord, these irons have been designed for maneuverability and portability. However, check out reviews before you purchase to see how it stacks up to other iron styles.
Garment Steamers: Garment steamers are perfect for getting wrinkles out on the go or for textiles that can’t be ironed flat on an ironing board — like curtains. Portable, clean, and easy, use a garment steamer as a supplementary tool to your steam iron for the look of smooth and clean clothes.
Garment Steam Presses: If you are looking for the crispest corners and seams for tablecloths, sheets, or napkins, consider purchasing a steam press. These machines are mostly used by professionals since they are a major monetary investment, and take up a lot of space. However, if you are looking for professional-grade steaming in a flat iron, this is the ultimate choice.

What features do I want?


With everything from self-cleaning reservoirs to retractable cords and automatic shut-offs, steam irons these days are equipped with just about everything. Like all home appliances, the more features that it comes with, the more expensive it tends to be. Think about the features that would really enhance your use versus those that would simply raise the price tag.

What iron works best for my clothing material?


Before buying an iron, think about the materials that you tend to iron most. Linens, cottons, and denim require heavy steam while synthetics are ironed at lower settings. If you spend more time ironing linen materials, a stronger iron may be necessary. Cotton and denim can be ironed at lower temperatures, and may not need a high quality iron. If possible, give the iron that you plan to buy a test run. There is no better way to decide if the iron is right for you than to use it.
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