43,163 plantings Landscape Design Photos

Grounded - Richard Risner RLA, ASLA
9 Reviews
Grounded - Modern Landscape Architecture
Ideabooks3,692
Questions0
Like geometry, don't like green plants in white stone. Too much hardscape
Gorgeous, love the splasshes of plants and contrast of different stones
The different shaped squares with different colored rocks and different plants.
plant ideas for the sculpture garden
Textural mix of materials and broken up with plants cape
“ziggity-zangy kind of stuff” — songstein
Jocelyn H. Chilvers
2 Reviews
summer garden
Ideabooks474
Questions0
on back small mountain - plant like this
lots of plants that you love, choke out weeds
4. Create a strong defense. Proper planting and gardening techniques (also known as cultural practices) can go a long way in preventing weeds from gaining a foothold in your yard. A healthy lawn
outcompete most weeds. Densely planted garden beds with well-mulched soil surfaces also have a fighting chance against weeds.
fertilizer is better. Big mistake. Always read the package directions when using any fertilizer, as overapplying can lead to a number of plant health issues. Some plants, like morning glories, will develop lush foliage but few flowers if overfertilized. Even worse, too much fertilizer can increase salt
“on back small mountain - plant like this” — A. T.
Missouri Botanical Garden
Sweet Marjoram
Ideabooks147
Questions0
Sweet Marjoram / Origanum majorana Courtesy Missouri Botanical Garden PlantFinder
want. light full sun; may need some afternoon shade in the tottest summer climates. water little to some Prime growing season late spring through fall plant spring into summer Favorites: Greek oregano (Origanum vulgare hirtum, O. heracleoticum) Italian oregano (O. x majoricum) sweet marjoram (O. majorana)
Planting and care: Choose a spot in full sun once all the danger of frost has passed and the soil temperature is fairly warm. The plants aren’t fussy about soil types but do require good drainage. Amend the soil before planting, then space seedlings about 12 inches
pots at least 6 inches wide.To keep the plants from getting woody, cut them back to 4 to 6 inches about a month after planting, then again in midsummer and early fall if growing them as perennials. Cut back completely or divide every few years to rejuvenate the plants and fertilize lightly once a year in
“Oregano.” — almostjane
J. Peterson Garden Design
Gardens
Ideabooks11
Questions0
Thanks! I'm always missing the planting season, since I'm not a native Texan.
Plant vegetables. Greens-loving people will be happy that we can still plant spinach, arugula, cabbage, kale, chard and other lettuce varieties right now. Make sure you choose a sunny spot in your garden and create plant tags or markers to remember what variety you planted where. Consider staggering
your plantings so that your greens won't be ready for harvest all at once. I like to plant a few transplants every two weeks or so to keep my harvest going throughout the cooler months.
“December plants” — rootyt
Glenna Partridge Garden Design
7 Reviews
City Townhouse
Ideabooks135
Questions0
Planting and care: Choose a site with loose, well-amended soil in full sun to partial shade. If summers are hot, you may need to provide afternoon shade. If you're planting seeds, soak them for 24 hours. Plant them ¼ inch deep and ½ inch apart, then thin to 6 inches apart for curly varieties and up to
a complete fertilizer and midseason with a nitrogen-rich fertilizer, especially if the plants are yellowing. Water regularly so the soil is evenly moist.Sow successively for a longer harvest.Harvest: Once the plant reaches about 6 to 8 inches tall, snip or clip the outside sprigs to harvest. Parsley freezes
types. Parsley can be very slow to germinate, so you might want to start with seedlings (this way you can taste test before buying as well). Set out plants about 6 to18 inches apart, depending on variety. You can also grow parsley in containers indoors or out. Containers can even be small enough to fit
“add herbs to flower pots this summer” — reguvenate
Monrovia
Dwarf Redblush Grapefruit
Ideabooks136
Questions0
Dwarf Redblush grapefruit. Small tree, regular size fruit. Pot this plant so it can be moved indoors in the winter.
enough unless you are absolutely besotted with a particular bloom. The plant should have lovely foliage as well, good form (shape) and, if possible, a delicious scent or berries in winter. As well as visual attributes consider a plant’s functional capabilities. Could it be used to screen, provide shade
to pot this plant so it can be moved indoors in the winter. Photo courtesy of Monrovia
Multi-talentedWhere possible do what landscape designers do and choose plants with more than
The Dwarf Redblush grapefruit works well potted or planted in the ground. While the size of the tree itself is smaller, the fruit is the size of a regular grapefruit, and comes in a large harvest. Since grapefruits (which were originally a hybrid between oranges and pummelos) have a low to medium cold
“Grapefruit” — lsinanyan
Summerset Gardens/Joe Weuste
24 Reviews
Front Yard Landscaping Project in NY
Ideabooks384
Questions0
A front yard foundation planting & stone walkway. Rhododendron, Astilbe, PJM, and a variety of low growing perennials are used in this foundation planting. The main front walkway is a wet laid flagstone and a secondary path in the lawn is made with 18" square blue stone. Landscape Design Build Services
Rhododendron as the back plant, astilbe. Need to find a low-growing perennial I like, not purple.
layers of plantings near path
Plants: boxwood, Rhoda, astilbe. All shade.
Rhododendron, Astilbe, PJM, and a variety of low growing perennials are used in this foundation planting. The main front walkway is a wet laid flagstone
big bushes in back, salvia (?) in front of smaller plants
“Rhoddy and Astilble nice combo” — teagan14
Rocco Fiore & Sons, Inc
Lake Forest Estate
Ideabooks2,626
Questions0
More hand-pruned boxwood hedges (a signature detail) and a dramatic fall planting of kale in the entry beds provide a breathtaking rhythm in the courtyard leading to the front door.
More hand-pruned boxwood hedges (a signature detail) and a dramatic fall planting of kale in the entry beds provide a breathtaking rhythm in the courtyard leading to the front door.
can take shade. Mature size: 1 foot to 1½ feet Growing tips: Set your plants about 1½ feet apart in the garden or add them to containers after the hot weather cools; lightly fertilize throughout the garden season. If you're planting them in the garden, choose a new spot each year, as soil diseases can
they can take shade.Mature size: 1 foot to 1½ feetGrowing tips: Set your plants about 1½ feet apart in the garden or add them to containers after the hot weather cools; lightly fertilize throughout the garden season. If you're planting them in the garden, choose a new spot each year, as soil diseases can
“Ornamental cabbage and kale” — kmanning7
© 2014 Houzz Inc.
Houzz® The new way to design your home™