47,082 plants Landscape Design Photos

Milieu Design
11 Reviews
Milieu Design
Ideabooks4,504
Questions3
Multi-colored plants, represents fall in a welcoming manner, it just called to my heart.
Planting notes. Plant seeds in late fall or mid spring, in loose soil about an inch deep. Step on them gently and water regularly.Place plants about 18 inches apart. Dig a hole about twice the size of the plant. Remove plant from container, give it a gentle shake
tallBloom time: Summer to fallPlanting tips: Plant in spring or fall and remove spent blooms. Prune after the first killing freeze and mulch during the winter.How to grow Black-eyed Susan (rudbeckia)
To rejuvenate both your garden and your own gardening enthusiasm, why not plant some fall-blooming annuals
irregular planting swaths to evoke a deep, lavish border. Some of my favorite specimens appear, including Joe Pye Weed, black-eyed Susan, Russian sage and silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis).
“Prairie planting, the second generation of perennial use in garden design, can be seen as a much fre” — lindaraeclark
ras-a, inc.
7 Reviews
p_House
Ideabooks5,418
Questions6
What's the name of the large plant
Calonian was right — the large agave like plant is indeed a Furcraea. The smaller plant to the right (with orange/red bloom) is a kangaroo paw. The ground cover is blue senecio mandraliscae (not pig face).
They look like Australian native plants. The large-leaf one looks like a Gymea Lily.
The Agave looking plant is Furcraea.
river rocks, plants and concrete wall
Use plants as sculpture. Some plants, such as this agave-like Furcraea (zones 9 to 11), are so dramatic that they effectively function as living sculpture. They are shown to best advantage when planted as a focal point. In this garden the furcraea softens a garden corner while captivating the eye.
“Desert landscaping” — jioerger
Frank & Grossman Landscape Contractors, Inc.
Hillside Medeterranean 03 (Design by Bernard Trainor & Associates)
Ideabooks3,331
Questions4
Can you tell me what the green plants are on the front right side of this picture? They are awesome!
Is this plant only grown in a warm climate ? Like where would one find this ? I have never seen this one before . I live in the midwest & we have cold winters . I love this . It is gorgeous !
name of plant on front lower right of page
Can this plant be used on landscape in Bensalem PA
Probably best answered by your nearest plant nursery. Take a printout of the picture to them and let us know.
“Plant” — angeltass1
Northern Virginia Landscape Architect and Designer
Main Street Landscape is your choice for landscape contractors in Northern Virginia. Offering full-service landscape architecture design and installation.
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Fullmer's Landscaping, Inc
cottage Garden
Ideabooks811
Questions0
miss manners - obedient plant - late summer/fall plant
Obedient plant, false dragonhead. color. spreads
aware that this robust plant’s growing habits aren’t quite as manageable; it often multiplies quickly in the garden. Either plant it in beds where it can spread to its heart’s desire or choose cultivars such as ‘Miss Manners’ or ‘Pink Manners’ that are bred to behave.
Obedient Plant, False Dragonhead Physostegia virginiana Snapdragon-like spikes of clustered white, pink or magenta flowers distinguish this native plant, which derives its common
robust plant’s growing habits aren’t quite as manageable; it often multiplies quickly in the garden. Either plant it in beds where it can spread to its heart’s desire or choose cultivars such as ‘Miss Manners’ or ‘Pink Manners’ that are bred to behave.USDA zones: 3 to 9Light requirement: Full sun to
“Garden” — toddy
Land Design, Inc.
Fenced Garden
Ideabooks16,138
Questions3
set in and around the plants
Light, frequent waterings will simply encourage shallow roots, which will not serve your plants well in times of heat and dry weather. It's preferable to water more deeply but less often, encouraging your plants' roots to dig down deep
will not serve your plants well in times of heat and dry weather. It's preferable to water more deeply but less often, encouraging your plants' roots to dig down deep into the soil," writes landscape designer Jenny Peterson. "Avoid watering directly onto the foliage of your plants, and water earlier
morning or later in the day to avoid rapid evaporation," she advises. "Better yet, install drip irrigation or soaker hoses to direct water closer to the plants' roots."
“mamas vacation garden” — rozoconnor
Mary-Liz Campbell Landscape Design
7 Reviews
Mary-Liz Campbell Landscape Design
Ideabooks5,450
Questions1
This is a planting around large boulders. Plants include junipers, Japanese blood grass, cleome, butterfly grass, sedums, pennisetum.
what are these type of plants
Yes my mistake, the red plant in the front is Japanese Blood Grass. It can be invasive so use it carefully.
use block planting for clean lines on sloped yards to emphasize a plant, or focus on color or foliage.
single species planted in groups give cleaner, more contemporary feeling
Vary the plant height. A mix of tall
tall and low plants, even if the difference is only a few inches, can make the difference between a garden that is static and a lively one. Keeping plant height in mind is also important when you plant. Generally, place taller plants at the back or in the middle, with the medium-height ones surrounding
“Wilder Garten” — sarahberni
CYAN Horticulture
5 Reviews
Aspidistra 'Asahi', at the JC Raulston Arboretum, NC
Ideabooks556
Questions0
Aspidistra (cast iron plant) Bold foliage for shady areas
Seasonal interest: Year-round When to plant: Anytime
plants for shade. would be indoor plant here.
cast iron plant well drained soil dappled to full shade
Cast-Iron Plant (Aspidistria elatior) A staple in the American South, cast-iron plant (Aspidistria elatior) is often sold as an indoor plant elsewhere
Cast irWell-drained soil Light requirement: Dappled to full shade Mature size: 2 1/4 feet tall and wideon plant
Cast-Iron Plant(Aspidistria elatior)A staple in the American South, cast-iron plant (Aspidistria elatior) is often sold as an indoor plant elsewhere. For me it has become essential for the darkest porches, where it thrones year-round without flinching. It's indestructible, so the common name was indeed
“Cast iron plants - currently around house in shaded areas” — vicki0205
The Garden Consultants, Inc.
Drifts of naturalistic plantings
Ideabooks4,578
Questions4
i would love to know the names of all of the plants you used here starting in the front and working back towards the molinia moorflame. they are beautiful! thank you
What happens in winter? What hardiness zones are best for this style of planting? Any in which it does not work?
Replace lawns with larger, ornamental plants for more visual punch and biodiversity. Larger spaces can go lawn free with mixed plantings of perennials, shrubs, trees
Option 3 - Plantings more natural, meadow look.
Like the drifts of planting, grasses are good too
Carex sprengelii (low-mounding,grass-like plant in foreground), Allium 'Summer Beauty' (pale pink flowers), Amsonia 'Blue Ice' (between Carex
current trend of Prairie-style plantings, it's easy to see how this can be transferred to the meadow plantings of English parkland.Allowing the dense, almost lush, plantings to grow hard against these house walls once again sets the house directly in the landscape.
“backyard” — dad271
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