49 Japanese maple Midcentury Living Design Photos

Johnson Berman
Mid-Century Modern Home
Ideabooks7,011
Questions7
Part of the Japanese aesthetic is simplicity. On the BB1-30XN Table Lamp, a boxy paper shade balances atop a slim stem with a rock-like round base.
Japanese symplicity
“Window” — eurpbear
Laidlaw Schultz architects
Living room
Ideabooks27,335
Questions10
“We were originally approached by the clients for a complete remodel, part of which was to create a true Japanese tea room. I was excited by the prospect of taking on the project, having just read a detailed book on the Tea Ceremony, its meaning, and associated
Japanese accents
“Book shelf!” — Jessie O'neal
Ryan
1958 Mid Century Modern Living Room Remodel
Ideabooks250
Questions2
What type of wood is this floor made from? It looks like it might be maple, but we aren't sure. We are looking for a grain that will go well with teak furniture.
Maple is a very hard and durable floor. Its great for homes with kids or pets.
3 1/4 maple
“Ceiling” — leojackson
Daniel Sheehan Photography
Laurelhurst House
Ideabooks6,708
Questions7
According to our archives this was an existing pre-finished maple floor with patches that were matched to the pre-existing weatherd color.
maple floor with patches that were matched to the pre-existing weatherd color
maple floors
“Great open space” — ckapocias
Coop 15 Architecture
18 Reviews
Washington Park
Ideabooks310
Questions1
japanese lantern
“favorite painted floor” — downtown01
Andrew Snow Photography
St. Lawrence Market Mid-Century
Ideabooks643
Questions0
created most of the art in the home. Aptly titled “Centre of Energy,” it's the only original piece that Henry says he would never sell. Inspired by Japanese brush painting, it was designed to be modular and can be hung in any direction. Mid-1950s sectional sofa: Schnadig; wooden side table: Lane Furniture
“bump out corners” — David Edrington, Architect
Lindsey Runyon Design
Phinney Ridge Home
Ideabooks133
Questions1
japanese lanterns
“Accent color” — gabebrett
Laidlaw Schultz architects
Living room
Ideabooks4,860
Questions3
anchors the far wall spanning the entire great room and connects the entire open living space. Originally, Schultz had intended to use traditional Japanese Shoji screens to conceal the books, but as the project progressed it was decided that the shelves should remain open.
“Shelving” — jack2011
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